WDFW LogoWashington Department of Fish & Wildlife
  HELP | EMPLOYMENT | NEWS | CONTACT  
WDFW LogoConservation

Washington Department of
Fish & Wildlife

Main Office
Natural Resources Building
1111 Washington St. SE
Olympia, WA 98501
360-902-2200
Get Directions

Mailing Address
600 Capitol Way N.
Olympia, WA 98501-1091

Phil Anderson
Director

 

 

<< Back to all DEIS Comments


Public Comments on Draft Environmental Impact Statement (DEIS)
Online Comments on DEIS: Wolf Conservation and Management Plan for Washington

<< Back to DEIS Online Comments list

Comments on Ecosystem Responses to Wolf Presence (Chapter 6.D):

Why are we trying to interupt the ecosystem with wolves, they will through it out of wack

Rick ,  Centralia WA

Return ecosystem to original heirarchy.

Ann Soule,  

Experience has shown that the reintroduction of wolves has a positive impact on the local ecosystem.

Joseph Pullara,  Port Angeles WA

Too often we focus on a single issue, an immediately apparent conundrum, and fail to see the rippling effects that are choices have on the larger motion of things. Let the apex hunter return to the Olympics where it belong and where it is needed to restore balance.

Sean V Owen,  Seattle WA

I strongly oppose any plans to introduce wolves anywhere in Washington. Yes, I know they are already here. They will spread on on their own and will do great damage to wildlife eventually, and this should not be aided by the department.

Gregory R Field,  Seattle WA

near total collapse.

Ty Brown,  Naches WA

Manipulated information that is misleading, a sales pitch for wolves.

dale denney,  colville WA

Presence of the wolf is nothing but good.

Anonymous

IT will help the ecosystem

Diane Sonntag,  Tenino WA

Good job on this section - I support the projected ecosystem responses to wolves - I only hope that we will allow it to happen. Is 15 breeding pairs in the state enough?

Jennifer Molesworth,  Twisp WA

all conjecture, based on what is said in the text....there is NO way to really predict what is likely to happen out in NATURE

AnonymousSequim WA

The wolf will become the dominate species and will rule the rest. Why have this added stressor to the eco-chain where prey animals will be wiped out?

John Eaton,  Ellensburg WA

"Yellowstone"

David Moen,  Oregon City OR

Wolves are helpfull to eco systems.

Jetta Hurst,  Auburn WA

NO WOLVES

Anonymous

Not as important today we have human preditors in numbers that do the old job of wolves.

Tom Freeman,  Tonasket WA

I believe organisms within the ecosystem will return to more natural patterns of behavior following the return of the wolf.

Ryan Alexander Sparks,  Pullman WA

Wolves help to keep the natural balance intact.

Tina Brown,  Juneau AK

I think you did a good job of highlighting the positive.

Marcia avajas,  Bainbridge Island WA

wolves are part of the ecosystem and belong here

Jack Hirsch,  bellevue WA

I don't understand why we create problems and impacts on wildlife and live stock and them go back in and shoot the wolves after they over populate. This process is sickening to me. I would consider myself a conservationist but seeing these wonderful animals shot is not the answer. This kind of restorating and then destroying what we have restored doesn't make any sense. The public that views this process has to wonder. We should have left their populations alone in Washington State and else where. I guess its like cougars and coyotes, we control them by hunting because we control nature. I just don't feel like we need to add populations and then destroy them. I look forward to your response.

Gary L Johnson,  Raymond WA

This is VERY important to keep in mind and is not often addressed...Good Work!

Lois Neuman,  Vancouver WA

its going to distory it

doug carney,  ellensburg WA

They Eliminate Deer and Elk Herds. Then they move on to other areas or other species.

Larry Hill,  Brush Prairie WA

In Yellowstone, the return of the wolf meant predation on ungulates. The ungulates, then, were culled for sick, injuredand diseased, and their herds became healthier. Helthier herds meant less eating of meadow grasses. This lead to healthier, more diverse grasslands. Healthier grasslands meant better hunting for birds of prey and other organisms, With the return of wolves, the ecosystem was restored and flourished. This, of course, makes for better for and resources for us.

Anonymous

Using Yellowstone as a template is stupid, since there was no hunting in Yellowstone prior to wolves leading to operpopulation. You must only compare hunted populations pre and post wolf.

Darcy Mitchem,  Toutle Wa WA

Open hunting seasons.

Larry Zalaznik,  Walla Walla WA