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Public Comments on Draft Environmental Impact Statement (DEIS)
Online Comments on DEIS: Wolf Conservation and Management Plan for Washington

<< Back to DEIS Online Comments list

General comments (Chapter 7):

No comment.

Sean V Owen,  Seattle WA

I strongly oppose any plans to introduce wolves anywhere in Washington. Yes, I know they are already here. They will spread on on their own and will do great damage to wildlife eventually, and this should not be aided by the department.

Gregory R Field,  Seattle WA

Eventually this will become an issue as the populations of prey animals deminishes.

Ty Brown,  Naches WA

Manipulated information that is misleading, a sales pitch for wolves.

dale denney,  colville WA

see earlier comments

Matt Dahlgreen,  Wenatchee WA

The recovery objective numbers of breeding pairs needed for down-listing and eventual delisting of wolves is too low to ensure a viable wolf population in WA. The lethal kill provisions for livestock owners and private citizens whose livestock or domestic dogs are attacked by wolves while wolves are in threatened or sensitive status are too liberal during the critical early phases of wolf recovery and could slow recovery. Translocation of wolves from areas within WA with healthy wolf populations to other areas to establish new populations is an important tool and will speed up the recovery and delisting process.

Wendy Young,  Bellevue WA

Any and all means to protect the people, public, domestic animals, dog should be preserved including termination.

Bob Hester,  Yakima WA

Wake up people, wolves are a bad idea period.

Daniel Haydon,  Creston WA

WHAT?! No compensation for children that are killed by wolves? But compensation for livestock losses is OK.

AnonymousSequim WA

I am adamantly opposed to the plan as written. To pass it must consider and resolve the issues identified in Appendix D. Wolves have serious impacts on livestock, wildlife, the economy and human interactions. For real life examples talk to the citizens within the wolf recovery efforts in Arizona and New Mexico and their reactions to not being able to do anything except watch as wolves rip the guts out of their livestock while still alive. Check with impacts in Idaho and what the wolves have done to wildlife populations. Coyotes are gone, elk herds desimated. Idaho sells 30,000 out of state hunting licenses each year and is a big part of the economy. In 2009, 10,000 tags went unsold and the state lost 1/3 of the normal income from sales of these licenses due to drop in game populations from wolf predations. Recover wolves, but you don't need them wall to wall across the state! Make sure the plan considers all the points in Appendix D and especially a quick reaction to wolf problems and population numbers. Finally, don't be stupid and ignore history. A tremendous effort was made to stop wolves in early America because of their predation and impacts to human populations. This was done for fun but out of necessity to stop a serious problem. Do not pretend that we can now have the wolf back without the serious problems the have caused in history!

Wayne Vinyard,  Glenwood WA

No more wolves.

John Eaton,  Ellensburg WA

Pet dog owners will suffer losses

bruce oergel,  ellensburg WA

NO WOLVES

Anonymous

Wa does not have the Land base that ID and MT have of public lands. Wolves wil relay on private lands more in Wa

Rick Lind,  Tonasket WA

support a wolf management plan that is strong enough to ensure wolves fully recover—to a population healthy enough to effectively resume their role as top predators in our state's ecosystems

Anonymous

Keep wolves out of Washington!

Florence Wheeler,  Vancouver WA

Well done.

Lois Neuman,  Vancouver WA

There's no doubt that once the wolves begin to reproduce and expand, that they will come into contact with humans. I cant say what will happen then, but I believe it will get violent.

Ka'imiloa ,  Battle Ground WA

What does allowing Wolves and Game Management have in common? I don't trust that this state will fund the necessary safeguards, reimbursements for losses, Controls etc. necessary to allow of existence of Wolves especialy these Non-Native canadian Killing Machines. The Govenor will cut all programs as this economy continues to slide.

Larry Hill,  Brush Prairie WA

get rid of all wolves. they are no good to the wilfare of our game and farm animals.

john casebeer,  mount vernon WA

Wolves should be "trained" to fear humans and domestic animals by tactics that could be considered harassment. Ultimately, this harassment is good for all parties, including wolves. The training to properly harass should be distr

Darcy Mitchem,  Toutle Wa WA