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<< Back to all DEIS Comments


Public Comments on Draft Environmental Impact Statement (DEIS)
Online Comments on DEIS: Wolf Conservation and Management Plan for Washington

<< Back to DEIS Online Comments list

Comments on Washington’s Population and Economy (Chapter 14.A):

Population and economic growth produces social changes conducive to protecting the backcountry for nature, while concentrating human impacts on the built and settled landscapes.

G.K. Gillespie,  Okanogan WA

Wolves will be a huge economic burden to Washington. No revenue from wolves. Huge managment costs.

Kirk Alexander,  Seattle WA

No comment

Sean V Owen,  Seattle WA

Our population continues to grow so there will be more wildlife/human interaction. This should not be a reason to buy more land and take it out of the working landscape.

Anonymous

Not enough room for as many wolves, use minority plan

dale denney,  colville WA

As the food sourse disappears the wolf herd will follow it, Which Means as urban groth takes place, don't you think these two will meet.

Gerald W Guhlke,  Reardan WA

wolves in washington can only promote tourism and related economic activities in remote parts of washington such as the olympic peninsula

william weathersby,  olympia WA

It seems that the rules and regulations in Washington drive business away from the state. Wolves will certainly not be a positive impact to the states economy.

Gary Nielsen,  Colville WA

Our population keeps growing and ever increasing urban sprall as citizens rightly seek their personal space. The rural economy is dependent on agriculture and livestock. Both situations are incompatable with wall to wall wolves as planned. Must addresss issues in Appendix D

Wayne Vinyard,  Glenwood WA

Our population is growing and our economy is suffering as I'm sure you have noticed the hits to our fish and wildlife budgets.

bruce oergel,  ellensburg WA

NO WOLVES

Anonymous

Population levels should be managed so as to encourage growth in urban areas and reduce sprawl. Economy could be better.

Ryan Alexander Sparks,  Pullman WA

Do not release any more wolves into this state.

Kevin Wolf,  Lacey WA

Hurting. Can't afford this program now.

Jay Arment,  Spokane WA

Loss of revenue due to wolf predation on ungulates will be a huge impact. Wolves need to be removed or eradicated from washington state.

Michael Korenko,  Carson WA

We have WAY too many humans in Washington State.

Janet Waite,  Lynnwood WA

The repopulation of the wolf is attempting to ' set the clock back' 70 plus years, and in my opinion is absolutely the wrong thing to attempt. Wolf's are a " rip and tear" species, and anyone with any experience knows very well they will decimate our dwindling elk and deer population. Wolf's are vicious and to witiness anything killed by a wolf is a devastating experience that you will remember for the rest of your life. Because of the ESP act there probably isn't much we can do to eliminate the wolf's, but we should certainly not encourage or assit them in repopulating into any area that they do not naturally migrate into. There will be guaranteed drastic encounters with humans, and to encourage their migration is so wrong. It bothers me that we are spending our scarce resourses on this project, and I strongly recommend we adopt alternative 4.

Jim Mason,  Montesano WA

Interesting information

Lois Neuman,  Vancouver WA

Remove Them now or we will be forced to file action agaisnt the state for introducing Non-Native Species to our state. If one life is lost because of this idiocy it is blood on your hands.

Larry Hill,  Brush Prairie WA

Need a boost to manufacturing.

Larry Zalaznik,  Walla Walla WA

We continue to grow and conflicts are going to take place.

Thomas F McLaughlin,  Spokane WA