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Public Comments on Draft Environmental Impact Statement (DEIS)
Online Comments on DEIS: Wolf Conservation and Management Plan for Washington

<< Back to DEIS Online Comments list

Comments on Livestock Production (Chapter 14.B):

We need less cows on public land. People's diets are changing. Okanogan produces grains, fruits and vegetalbes. Newer ag families prefer wild back country to the old fashioned practice of gracing domestic livestock there.

G.K. Gillespie,  Okanogan WA

No comment

Sean V Owen,  Seattle WA

Agriculture and livestock production will continue to be a needed industry in this state and shouldn't always take a back seat to wildlife management. Working landscapes can have healthy wildlife populations without ruining a particular industry.

Anonymous

Our Ag. is hurting now. Shall ed make it harder?

Gerald W Guhlke,  Reardan WA

Our farming methods are unsustainable!

Diane Sonntag,  Tenino WA

washington's citizens and the natural envirment do NOT need to subsidize business people whose life of work happens to be raising meat animals. ranchers get enough subsidies from the blm, dnr etc. ranchers must take risks, as to other businesses without public rescue. some organizations will pay to replace an animal proven to be killed by wolves. that should be protection enough.

william weathersby,  olympia WA

A large part of the states ecomony, especially in the rural areas.

Gary Nielsen,  Colville WA

Wolfs kill for fun. Do not reintroduce them.

Rich James,  Port Angeles WA

Must address issues in Appendix D. Present plan is gross understatement of impact to livestock. Get Real.

Wayne Vinyard,  Glenwood WA

Livestock production is a large business in this area and it would be held back from doing its best at generating wealth. Wealth can only come from the ground or livestock and this will be limited by the wolf idea.

John Eaton,  Ellensburg WA

Oh boy, will they suffer if this plan goes through!

bruce oergel,  ellensburg WA

NO WOLVES

Anonymous

I FEEL SORRY FOR THE FARMERS THEY HAVE A HARD ENOUGH TIME SURVIVING WITH OUT WOLF PROBLEMS

RYAN JERLES,  RAYMOND WA

As a board certified agronomist, I work with a number of cow/calf producers and am currently responsible for management of about 32,000 acres of rangeland in central washington. My producers have obvious concerns about wolf depredation issues, which are the focus of considerable portion of the document. Based on experience over many years with fellow producers in Idaho, Wyoming and Montana, the "weak link" here is the ability to detect, and establish reasonable proof of cause of mortality...this has the ability to undermine the entire idea of compensation for depredation losses. I would like to see a legal definition incorporated which sets a standard of "more likely than not" rather than a much more challenging standard of "to a reasonable degree of scientific certainty". It makes sense to incorporate this element in the final plan rather than leave any potential ambiguity. In addition this is what stockmen will tell you has been the source of the majority of their problems.

Stuart Turner,  West Richland WA

Has too much influence in terms of industry input and lobbying on land use decisions. I know I can't afford to take time off and go to Olympia, nor can I buy any lawmakers dinner, unless they want to eat at McDonalds...

Ryan Alexander Sparks,  Pullman WA

Hurting, can't afford this program now.

Jay Arment,  Spokane WA

I am afraid too many people will take advantage and try to get money for livestock or shoot a wolf by poaching.

Rick Turvey,  Yakima WA

None

Lois Neuman,  Vancouver WA

If some concerns come to pass, such as stress on the animals, increased costs due to needing more manpower or rotating, etc. Perhaps then the cost of raising livestock would reflect more the "true" cost.

Anonymous

If it pays, they will come.

Larry Zalaznik,  Walla Walla WA

We need a viable livestock economy in our state.

Thomas F McLaughlin,  Spokane WA