Viewing Chum Salmon
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Kennedy Creek (South Puget Sound)

Kennedy Creek-Averge Run Timing Chart
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Kennedy Creek-Escapement Chart
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Kennedy Creek is a small low-land stream that flows into the head of Totten Inlet in Southern Puget Sound. It is one of the most productive chum salmon production streams in Washington State, with escapements averaging 41,000 spawners during the ten-year period of 1992 - 2001.

The creek is accessible for anadromous salmon migration and spawning from saltwater up-stream for 2.3 miles to an impassible water fall. Since the large numbers of chum salmon escaping to Kennedy Creek are confined to this relatively short distance, there are extraordinary opportunities for viewing the fish.

Kennedy Creek chum are a fall-run stock, generally returning to the stream between mid-October and mid-December. The best viewing opportunities are during the month of November.

For visitors to wishing to view the chum salmon, the Kennedy Creek Salmon Trail provides a unique opportunity. The trail was developed by the South Puget Sound Salmon Enhancement Group, with the assistance of numerous partners (see below) Visitors will find easy access, multiple salmon viewing platforms, interpretive signs, and Trail Guides to answer questions.

Information About The Kennedy Creek Salmon Trail

Kennedy Creek map

Kennedy Creek chum salmon are on view as they make their way home to spawn. The Kennedy Creek Salmon Trail is open for visitors every weekend in November. This is an excellent opportunity for local residents and school groups to see chum salmon in their natural environment.

The half-mile trail, hosted by the South Puget Sound Salmon Enhancement Group (SPSSEG), is almost entirely ADA accessible. The interpretive trail is a low-impact trail system with interpretive signs and viewing platforms for watching wild chum salmon. The trail traverses riparian areas and pleasant second growth lowland forest.

Purpose: The Trail offers salmon viewing and habitat interpretation in a natural setting that educates students, teachers, and the general public about what Washington's at-risk salmon runs need to survive and prosper.

Open: Weekends in November. Also Veteran's Day and the day after Thanksgiving. Hours: 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.

Kennedy Creek turnoff
How to get there: From Highway 101 in south Mason County, approximately halfway between Olympia and Shelton, turn west at milepost 356 onto Old Olympic Highway. Go ¾ mile to the turn-off to a gravel road signed "Kennedy Creek." Go ½ mile on the gravel road to the Salmon Trail parking area.

School Field Trips, Group Tours and Classroom Programs: Reservations for weekday visits in November for schools and other organized groups and the new fish dissection in the classroom program are available.

In 2003, more than 2,200 school aged (K-12) children visited with their teachers and chaperones.

For more information or reservations: Contact the Trail Coordinator, Stephanie Bishop, at Mason Conservation District at (360) 427-9436 ext. 22 or 1-800-527-9436, email her at stephanie@masoncd.org. You can also contact the South Puget Sound Salmon Enhancement Group (SPSSEG) at (360) 412-0808, website: http://spsseg.org/ or email spsseg@spsseg.org

Kennedy Creek trail Sign
Visitors

Partners: The Kennedy Creek Salmon Trail was developed by South Puget Sound Salmon Enhancement Group and Taylor United Shellfish Company, with generous cooperation and assistance from: Eld Inlet Watershed Council, The Evergreen State College, Mason Conservation District, People for Salmon, Puget Sound Water Quality Action Team, Resource Action Council, Robert W. Droll Landscape Architect, Simpson Timber Company, South Sound Fly Fishers, South Sound GREEN, Southwest Puget Sound Watershed Council, Squaxin Island Tribe, Washington Council B Trout Unlimited, United States Navy Seabees, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Washington Department of Natural Resources, Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, WSU Cooperative Extension, Washington Conservation Corps, and many local teachers and volunteers.