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Washington Department of
Fish & Wildlife

Main Office
Natural Resources Building
1111 Washington St. SE
Olympia, WA 98501
360-902-2200
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Mailing Address
600 Capitol Way N.
Olympia, WA 98501-1091

Phil Anderson
Director

 

 

National Coastal Wetlands Conservation Act Grant Program

Description
The Coastal Wetlands Planning, Protection, and Restoration Act (Title III of P.L. 101-646) established the National Coastal Wetlands Conservation Grant Program to acquire, restore, and enhance wetlands of coastal states and the trust territories.

Since enactment of the law in 1990, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) has been working with the States to acquire, restore, enhance and manage pristine and threatened coastal wetlands through partnerships between federal and state agencies. Funding for the program is generated from excise taxes on fishing equipment and motorboat and small engine fuels.

Administering Agency
US Fish and Wildlife Service http://www.fws.gov/coastal/CoastalGrants/

WDFW Grant Contact Information
Contracts Office Contact: Bill Brooks, (360) 902-2433, brookwcb@dfw.wa.gov

Projects are managed by individual WDFW biologists. See the list of funded projects below for the project manager for specific projects.

Funded Projects and Applications
A list of WDFW projects funded through the National Coastal Wetlands Conservation Grant Program for years 2002-2005 is available below.

Funded Projects
Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife Funded Projects, Federal Fiscal Years (FFY) 2002-2005

2002: Lower Nooksack River Acquisition and Restoration
The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife received funding to acquire 324 acres of formerly tidal river flood plain and wetland habitat on the Lower Nooksack River, feeding Bellingham Bay in Whatcom County. The acquisition completes a continuous 4.4-mile, 1,700-acre wildlife corridor and provides important rearing and salt water transition habitat for six species of Pacific salmon, including chinook salmon and bull trout.

Partners: Salmon Recovery Funding Board, Ducks Unlimited, Whatcom County

Coastal grant: $ 954,600
State share: $ 345,000
Partner share: $ 66,700
Total cost: $ 1,366,300

WDFW contact: Steve Seymour (360) 676-2003, seymosas@dfw.wa.gov.

2003: Dungeness-Meadowbrook Coastal Wetlands and Estuary Habitat
The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, in cooperation with the Salmon Recovery Funding Board, received funding to protect--through a combination of acquisitions and easements 140 acres in the Dungeness and Meadowbrook Creek Estuary. A variety of salmon species, Taylor’s Checkerspot butterfly and a high number of other diverse wildlife species, benefit from this project.

Partners: Clallam County (SRFB-State), Audubon/Rainshadow Natural Science Foundation, the Jamestown S'Klallam Tribe, the North Olympic Land Trust, North Olympic Salmon Coalition, and the Puget Consumers Coop Farmland Fund.

Coastal grant: $ 997,243
State share: $ 339,090
Partner share: $ 88,300
Total cost: $ 1,424,633

WDFW contact: Anita McMillan, (360) 457-4601, mcmilakm@dfw.wa.gov

2003: English Boom-Leaque Island Acquisition and Restoration
The Department of Fish and Wildlife, in cooperation with the state’s Salmon Recovery Fund, received funding to purchase and restore the tidal habitat on about 150 acres of diked tidal slough, salt marsh and freshwater wetlands. The project is in the Stillaguamish River Estuary and Skagit Bay in Island County, an area that supports large concentrations of migratory and wintering raptors, waterfowl, shorebirds and songbirds.

Partners: Stillaguamish Tribe, Island County, Camano Island Salmon Work Group, Friends of Camano Island State Park, Island County Beach Watcher Program and the Stilli-Snohomish Fisheries Enhancement Task Force.

Coastal grant: $ 977,000
State share: $ 444,500
Partner share: $ 15,400
Total cost: $ 1,436,900

WDFW contact: Steve Seymour (360) 676-2003 seymosas@dfw.wa.gov.

2004: Deadman Slough Acquisition and Restoration Project
The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, in cooperation with the state’s Salmon Recovery Funding Board, received funding to purchase 243 acres and restore 353 acres of estuarine marsh near the mouth of the Snohomish River. The project provides nursery habitat for several species of salmon, as well as wintering habitat for migrating waterfowl and shorebirds.

Partners: The Cascade Land Conservancy, Ducks Unlimited, and the Pacific Coast Joint Venture.

Coastal grant request: $1,000,000
State share: $ 400,000
Partners share: $ 373,000
Total cost: $1,773,000

WDFW contact: Lora Leschner (425) 775-1311 Ext 121 leschlll@dfw.wa.gov

2004: Dungeness Estuarine Wetlands Project
The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, in cooperation with the state’s Salmon Recovery Funding Board, received funding to acquire and permanently conserve several coastal wetlands properties in the lower 1.5 miles of the Dungeness River and Meadowbrook Creek systems. Approximately 50 acres will be purchased with this project, providing habitat essential to several salmon species, migratory birds, shorebirds and also to the rare Taylors checkerspot butterfly.

Partners: Jamestown Sklallam Tribe, Clallam County, Ducks Unlimited, Dungeness National Wildlife Refuge Coordinated Volunteer Program, Puget Consumers Co-op, Dungeness River Center, Olympic Peninsula Audubon Society, and the North Olympic Land Trust.

Coastal grant request: $987,500
State share: $414,500
Partners share: $ 35,106
Total cost: $1,437,196

WDFW contact: Anita McMillan, (360) 457-4601, mcmilakm@dfw.wa.gov

2004: Lower Sequim Bay Estuary Acquisition and Restoration
The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife received funding to acquire eight acres of coastal wetlands and restore an additional 7 acres of wetland habitat, completing an ongoing restoration effort affecting about 156 acres of coastal wetlands. The project benefits chinook and chum salmon, as well as migratory birds such as the greater yellowlegs, black oystercatcher, and rock sandpipers.

Partners: Clallam County, the Clallam County Conservation District, the Jamestown Sklallam Tribe, Clallam County Streamkeepers, Dungeness River Audubon Center, and the Olympic Peninsula Audubon Society.

Coastal grant request: $998,900
State share: $685,000
Partners share: $133,000
Total cost: $1,816,900

WDFW contact: Randy Johnson (360) 417-3301 johnsraj@dfw.wa.gov

2004: South Padilla Bay Acquisition and Restoration
The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, in cooperation with the Salmon Recovery Funding Board, received funding to acquire and restore approximately 440 acres of estuarine wetlands along the south end of Padilla Bay, within the Puget Sound ecosystem of northwest Washington. The project provides nursery habitat for several species of salmon, as well as foraging areas for migratory waterfowl and shorebirds during their annual migrations

Partners: Skagit County, Ducks Unlimited, and the Pacific Coast Joint Venture.

Coastal grant request: $1,000,000
State share: $ 100,000
Partners share: $520,000
Total: $1,620,000

WDFW contact: Lora Leschner (425) 775-1311 Ext 121 leschlll@dfw.wa.gov

2004: Willapa/Cedar River Acquisition
The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife received funding to purchase 475 acres of wetlands in the Cedar River Estuary and restore the habitat for wintering shorebirds. In addition to providing improved resting and feeding habitat for several species of waterfowl and shorebirds, the project provides critical salmon rearing habitat, and protects two sites which are important for the reproductive success of band-tailed pigeons.

Partners: The Cascade Land Conservancy, the Wildlife Forever Foundation, and the Pacific Coast Joint Venture.

Coastal grant request: $860,000
State share: $ 5,000
Partners share: $395,000
Total cost: $1,260,000

WDFW contact: Greg Schirato, (360) 956-2800, schirgas@dfw.wa.gov

2005: Davis Bay Acquisition and Restoration
The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife received funding to acquire conservation easements and restore approximately 120 acres of estuarine and freshwater wetlands on Davis Bay, within the Puget Sound Ecosystem. The restoration includes the removal of the existing tide gate system, filling of drainage ditches, raising two sections of roads that will be inundated by the restoration, and providing a new potable water system for several families. This project provides rearing habitat for fish and important migration and wintering habitat for birds.

Partners: A private landowner, Ducks Unlimited, Pacific Coast Joint Venture, and the San Juan Preservation Trust.

Coastal grant request: $1,000,000
State share: $10,000
Partners share: $1,083,000
Total cost: $2,093,000

WDFW contact: Ruth Milner (425) 379-2310 milnerlm@dfw.wa.gov'

2005: Willapa Bay/ Seal Slough Acquisition Project
The Washington State Department of Fish and Wildlife received funding to purchase 1,002 acres of fee title and 374 acres of conservation easement along Seal Slough, Lynn Point, and Willapa Bay tidelands and adjacent uplands. The project will include control of invasive Spartina on 300 acres of the tide flats, enhancing utilization by wintering shorebirds and foraging waterfowl.

Partners: Cascade Land Conservancy, Pacific Coast Joint Venture, and Wildlife Forever Foundation.

Coastal grant request: $900,000
State share: $5,000
Partners share: $562,400
Total cost: $1,467,400

WDFW contact: Greg Schirato, (360) 956-2800, schirgas@dfw.wa.gov