Non-Traditional "Section 6" Grant Program
 

Traditional "Section 6" Conservation Grant Program

Grant Program Description
The Cooperative Endangered Species Conservation Fund includes a Conservation Grant Program, commonly known as "Traditional Section 6” grants. This grant program is administered by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) to provide financial assistance to states and territories to implement conservation projects for the recovery of federally listed species and species at risk.

A State must have a cooperative agreement with the USFWS under Section 6 of the Endangered Species Act to receive grants. Section 6 defines and establishes the principles and rules related to the state’s role in co-management of federally listed species. Traditional Section 6 projects are state conducted projects that address research and recovery needs of listed and candidate species. Typically, available funding is significantly less than is needed for listed species. Projects for listed species are prioritized and a subset is selected until all available funds are allocated. Typical projects are active for several years as long as a species is still listed and it's needs and priorities remain at the top of the list.

Administering Agency
U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service
http://www.fws.gov/endangered/grants/index.html

US Fish and Wildlife Service Contact Information
Ted Thomas, (360-753-4327), ted_thomas@fws.gov

Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife Grant Contact Information
Rocky Beach, (360) 902-2510, richard.beach@dfw.wa.gov

Funded Projects and Applications
Cooperative Endangered Species Conservation Fund Conservation Grant Awards, 2002-2005 (Traditional Section 6)

Washington State Bull Trout
The objective of this project is to determine the abundance and distribution of native char (bull trout) populations in Washington state. The primary focus of this research is to evaluate incidental fishing mortality of bull trout. This will increase knowledge and understanding of federally listed bull trout, and help with recovery of the species.

Beginning Date: 10/27/04
Ending Date: 12/31/05
Federal Cost: $46,780

Washington Ground Squirrel Population Assessment
The objective of this project is to complete surveys of Washington ground squirrel populations and their habitat and analyze the data using statistical tests to relate population information to habitat information. The will enhance understanding of the habitat needs of Washington ground squirrel and establish the squirrels' current population level and structure for comparison to any future studies or management.

Beginning Date: 10/04/04
Ending Date: 12/31/05
Federal Cost: $32,500

Snowy Plover
This project is designed to: collect information on current distribution of snowy plover nesting sites in coastal Washington from Tokeland north; survey all known sites for presence of snowy plovers during breeding season and record nest success/failure; collect data on human use of snowy plover habitats; and protect nesting sites with exclosures. This will protect nesting sites and obtain data to assist in determining what management actions might be necessary to achieve recovery goals.

Federal Cost: $4,900

Pygmy Rabbit
The objectives of this project are to continue captive breeding efforts for the endangered pygmy rabbit, and to conduct field surveys and recovery/conservation planning for the rabbit. This will improve captive breeding techniques and pygmy rabbit management/recovery efforts.

Beginning Date: 09/07/04
Ending Date: 07/31/05
Federal Cost: $52,165

Marbled Murrelet Population Assessment
The objectives of this project are to estimate the distribution and population size of
murrelets on the outercoast of Washington and compare current season data to previous field seasons.

Beginning Date: 09/23/04
Ending Date: 08/31/05
Federal Cost: $50,000

Selkirk Mountains Woodland Caribou Recovery in WA 2003-2004
The objectives of this project are to conduct the final analysis of the Selkirk Mountains woodland caribou data and present this information in a final report. Fieldwork to monitor transplanted and resident mountain caribou throughout the recovery area took place from September 1995 through July 2003. Information collected included the causes of caribou mortality, and monitoring population trends and mortality. This project will provide information to WDFW and other agencies and entities regarding the status of the recovery action of attempting to establish caribou in the western portion of the Selkirk Mountains.

Beginning Date: 09/01/03
Ending Date: 09/30/04
Federal Cost: $90,000

Grizzly Bear Forensic Samples, Northern WA
The objectives of this project are to facilitate the state's ability to understand the potential changes in distribution and abundance of the grizzly bear population in the Selkirk and North Cascade mountains over the next ten years. Specific project objectives include: 1) investigate reliable sightings of grizzly bears in northern Washington by searching the area and collecting appropriate DNA samples, 2) develop and employ inexpensive laboratory protocols for identifying grizzly bear DNA from forensic-like samples, and 3) develop standard procedures for collecting field samples. The benefits of this project will be to develop a low cost and quick way to identify bear scar and/or hair samples to species to assist with differentiation between grizzly bear and black bear sightings and monitor the population of grizzly bear in northern Washington.

Beginning Date: 09/1/03
Ending Date: 09/30/04
Federal Cost: $10,000

Washington State Bull Trout Abundance, Distribution and Genetic Studies
The objectives of this project are to determine the abundance and life history of native char populations in Washington State, and to determine the distribution of different bull trout and Dolly Varden populations by collecting genetic information from populations surveyed. The genetic results will provide a quantitative basis for assessing the interrelationships of bull trout populations in Washington State.

Beginning Date: 09/25/03
Ending Date: 12/31/05
Federal Cost: $20,816

Marbled Murrelet Population Assessment
The objective of this project is to estimate the distribution and population size of murrelets on the outercoast of Washington and compare current season data to the two previous field seasons. California Department of Fish and Game is cooperating in determination of murrelet populations by conducting at-sea populations in California. This will provide data regarding the seasonal distribution and abundance of murrelet populations at sea, and their annual reproductive success, which are essential in order to manage for the continued survival of the species.

Beginning Date: 09/15/03
Ending Date: 08/31/04
Federal Cost: $40,000

Pygmy Rabbit Captive Breeding and Release
The objective of this project is to conduct captive breeding of Columbia Basin (Washington) and Idaho pygmy rabbits. These activities will maintain the unique genetic composition in Washington’s population and continued refinement of husbandry techniques.

Beginning Date: 09/24/03
Ending Date: 06/30/04
Federal Cost: $40,000

Snowy Plover
The objectives of this project are: to collect information on current distribution of snowy plover nesting sites in coastal Washington from Tokeland north; survey all known sites for presence of snowy plovers during breeding season and record nest success/failure; collect data on human use of snowy plover habitats; and protect nesting sites with exclosures. This will protect nesting sites and provide data to assist in determining what management actions might be necessary to achieve recovery goals.

Beginning Date: 09/29/03
Ending Date: 10/31/04
Federal Cost: $10,000

Selkirk Mountains Woodland Caribou Study
The objective of this study is to monitor and analyze radio-collared caribou to determine seasonal movements, home ranges, and mortality throughout the southern Selkirk Mountains. This will aid in understanding population dynamics of caribou to aid management decisions in recovering the species.

Beginning Date: 07/02/02
Ending Date: 06/30/03
Federal Cost: $65,500

Marine Population and Distribution Marbled Murrelet
The objective of this project is to estimate the distribution and population size of murrelets by observing numbers on the water on the outer coast of Washington and along the Strait of Juan de Fuca in 2002. This will provide agencies with needed information to evaluate the effect of commercial fishing management decisions on marbled murrelets and use the information to reverse their population decline.

Beginning Date: 07/02/02
Ending Date: 08/31/03
Federal Cost: $40,000

Washington State Bull Trout Abundance, Distribution and Genetic Studies
The objectives of this project are: to determine the abundance, distribution and life history of native char populations in Washington; determine the distribution of different bull trout and Dolly Varden populations by collecting tissue samples from which to gather genetic information about surveyed populations; and determine critical habitat use of migrating populations. This will provide resources managers with better information to understand potential risks of activities on unique populations of bull trout.

Beginning Date: 07/02/02
Ending Date: 09/30/05
Federal Cost: $40,000

Columbia Basin Pygmy Rabbit-Captive Breeding and Release
The objectives of this project are: to captive rear pygmy rabbits from Washington and Idaho from August 2002-June 2002; on more abundant Idaho pygmy rabbits, test husbandry techniques such as artificial insemination and different pen types using observations including video monitoring; test success of releasing captive Idaho captive-reared pygmy rabbits into the wild in Idaho. This will maintain and improve genetic diversity of captive pygmy rabbit population and the declining Washington population. It will use the more abundant Idaho population to better understand whether captive releases can be done successfully and which techniques provide the greatest success to see whether captive rearing/release is a viable part of the management of the declining Washington population.

Beginning Date: 07/15/02
Ending Date: 08/30/03
Federal Cost: $60,000

Western Snowy Plover
The objectives of this project are to protect snowy plover and their habitats by use of exclosures and other means of discouraging predation, and to protect snowy plover from human use by encouraging human uses compatible with snowy plover nesting and foraging and discouraging human uses that are not. Incompatible uses include off-road-vehicle use, horseback riding, approaching birds and nests, and having dogs off-leash. This will increase nesting success of snowy plover and increase human awareness of the effects of human uses on snowy plover.

Beginning Date: 08/01/02
Ending Date: 09/30/03
Federal Cost: $10,616