Report a Poacher or Other Violation

For more information on
hunting, please contact the
WDFW Wildlife Program.
Phone: 360-902-2515
wildthing@dfw.wa.gov

 

 
GoHuntAccess multi-layered maps displaying game management unit (GMU) boundaries, deer and elk management areas, pheasant-release sites, and Private Lands Hunting Opportunities, as well as roads, topographical features and county lines. In addition, harvest statistics and hunting regulations are available by specific locale and species.

Private Lands Access for Hunters

By working closely with landowners who voluntarily open their lands to public access, the Department of Fish and Wildlife has been helping hunters access private lands since 1948.  Currently, there are over 1 million acres of private land open to public access though WDFW agreements.  With Washington’s population growth, finding a place to hunt is increasingly difficult, so the Department is stepping up efforts to add more opportunity.  Our goal is to increase the land available by at least 300,000 acres by 2015; utilizing funds generated through special hunting permit applications, as well as other fund sources, to address high priority access issues like big game hunting on industrial timberland and waterfowl, turkey, and pheasant hunting in key areas of the state.

Hunting on Private Lands Is A Privilege, Treat Private Lands With Respect

Ask Permission

Obey Posted Signs

Leave Gates As You Found Them

Pack Out Your Trash

Be Courteous

 


Private Lands Access Programs

Feel Free to Hunt Register to Hunt Written Permission Program Landowner Hunting Permit Program
A property enrolled in the WDFW Feel Free to Hunt program has no requirements for additional landowner permission to be able hunt the property. While additional permission is not needed, you must still obey all posted signs on the property, including safety zone and vehicle restriction signs. Remember, hunting on private property is a privilege. Treating private property with respect and demonstrating courteous, legal, and ethical behavior is critical to ensuring future access. In order to hunt on a property enrolled in the WDFW Register to Hunt program, you will need to park in designated parking areas and fill out a hunter registration form at the site. Additional landowner permission is not needed for you to hunt the property, however you must obey all signs posted on the property, including safety zone and vehicle restriction signs. Remember, hunting on private property is a privilege. Treating private property with respect and demonstrating courteous, legal, and ethical behavior is critical to ensuring future access. In order to hunt on a property enrolled in the WDFW Hunt by Written Permission program, you must visit the site and contact the landowner to acquire a permission slip PRIOR to hunting. You must have a valid permission slip with you while hunting this property. Landowner contact information is located on signs posted on the property. In addition, you must obey all posted signs on the property, including safety zone and vehicle restriction signs. Remember, hunting on private property is a privilege. Treating private property with respect and demonstrating courteous, legal, and ethical behavior is critical to ensuring future access. In order to hunt on a property enrolled in the WDFW Landowner Hunting Permit (LHP) program, you must either be selected in a special permit drawing held by WDFW or the Landowner or contact the Landowner directly. Landowner name can be found on signs posted on property boundaries. In addition to a hunting permit from WDFW, hunters must contact the landowner prior to hunting and obtain a written permission slip that must remain with you while hunting on this property. You must obey all posted signs on the property, including safety zone, vehicle restrictions, and boundary signs. Remember, hunting on private property is a privilege. Treating private property with respect and demonstrating courteous, legal, and ethical behavior is critical to ensuring future access.