Scatter Creek
Wildlife Area Location

CONTACT INFORMATION
Darric Lowery
Manager
PO Box 609
Rochester, WA 98579
(360) 273-5126

 
Wildlife Areas
Scatter Creek Wildlife Area
Scatter Creek Unit
The Chehalis unit is 531 acres located southwest of Elma. This unit is maintained for waterfowl habitat and associated recreation. Most of the land owned by WDFW is open wetland, riparian shrub habitat, or meadow/field habitat. Wildlife species known to exist in the area include the Olympic mudminnow, mink, shorebirds, wood duck, waterfowl, trumpeter swan, and osprey. Limited farming improves waterfowl forage and use of the area as does efforts to increase open water habitat.
Viewing Opportunities

Birds

  • Birds of Prey
  • Eagles
  • Songbirds
  • Upland Birds
  • Wading Birds
  • Waterfowl
  • Mammals

  • Bear
  • Deer
  • Elk
  • Small Mammals
  • Other

  • Butterflies
  • Reptiles/Amphibians
  • Wildflowers
  • How to Get Here
    Access Site #1
    Driving Directions
    From Montesano, drive East on Hwy 12 7.7 miles to Schoulweller road. From Elma, drive west on Hwy 12 2.1 miles to Schoulweller road. Drive south on Schoulweller road .4 miles to parking area.
    Parking/Restroom Information
    Restrooms available Handicap parking available
    Unique Features
    State highway 12 borders the area on the north. To the west the area is bordered by Hansen Creek and to the south by Vance Creek. The area is approximately 527 acres in size. A rock quarry is located on the northeast border of the wildlife area and agricultural land surrounds much of the rest of the area. Most of the land owned by the Department is best characterized as open wetland, riparian shrub habitat, or meadow/field habitat. The habitats are interspersed and thus, allow for an abundance of species. Species known to exist in the area include the Olympic mud minnow, mink, shorebirds, wood duck, waterfowl, trumpeter swan, and osprey. Limited farming improves waterfowl forage and use of the area as does efforts to increase open water habitat.
    Other Information
    Some trails also exist for hiking, but flooding, which is common in the area, may restrict access at times. Disabled acess trail to disabled hunting blind
    The 114-acre Ferbrache unit is located five miles southeast of Montesano. This unit is maintained for wintering waterfowl forage, fishing access and a pheasant release site for fall hunting.
    Viewing Opportunities

    Birds

  • Birds of Prey
  • Eagles
  • Shorebirds
  • Songbirds
  • Upland Birds
  • Wading Birds
  • Waterfowl
  • Mammals

  • Deer
  • Elk
  • Small Mammals
  • Other

  • Reptiles/Amphibians
  • How to Get Here
    Access Site #1
    Driving Directions
    From Montesano drive west on Hwy 12 approximately 2 miles to Monte – Brady road. Drive approximately 1 mile easterly to Brady Loop Road. Turn south on Brady Loop Road and follow signs to parking area.
    Parking/Restroom Information
    Established parking area. Restrooms available.
    Unique Features
    This area is a popular pheasant release site and waterfowl hunting site.
    Other Information
    No overnight camping or parking.
    The 80-acre Hoxit unit is located 1.5 miles south of Porter and is maintained for winter waterfowl habitat.
    Viewing Opportunities

    Birds

  • Birds of Prey
  • Eagles
  • Songbirds
  • Upland Birds
  • Wading Birds
  • Waterfowl
  • Mammals

  • Bear
  • Deer
  • Elk
  • Small Mammals
  • Other

  • Butterflies
  • Reptiles/Amphibians
  • Wildflowers
  • How to Get Here
    Access Site #1
    Driving Directions
    From Elma drive 7.8 miles South on Hwy 12. From Oakville drive 6.2 miles North on Hwy 12.
    Parking/Restroom Information
    Unimproved parking area. No restrooms.
    Unique Features
    Ongoing wetland restoration and waterfowl enhancement project at this site. Foot access to Chehalis River. Popular waterfowl location with good birding opportunities.
    Other Information
    No overnight camping or parking.
    The Satsop unit is 1,432 acres near the confluence of the Satsop River and the Chehalis River. This unit is restored and maintained as floodplain habitat.
    Viewing Opportunities

    Birds

  • Birds of Prey
  • Eagles
  • Shorebirds
  • Songbirds
  • Upland Birds
  • Wading Birds
  • Waterfowl
  • Mammals

  • Deer
  • Elk
  • Small Mammals
  • Other

  • Reptiles/Amphibians
  • How to Get Here
    Access Site #1
    Driving Directions
    Property located at the mouth of the Satsop River. Currently not in the WDFW online mapping database.
    Parking/Restroom Information
    No parking. No restrooms
    Other Information
    Future proposed riparian restoration area,
    The Swakane Unit covers 11,273 acres of land located north of Wenatchee including Burch Mountain, Swakane Canyon, and Tenas George Canyon. Small wetlands occurring in the Swakane Canyon bottom are associated with beaver activity and springs. Important mule deer wintering habitat occurs on the area and the Swakane bighorn sheep herd uses the area year round. Upland game birds using the area include chukar, gray partridge, blue grouse, ruffed grouse and California quail. Pheasant releases are made each fall to provide additional hunting opportunity. WDFW began restoration of 100 acres of abandoned fields to shrubsteppe habitat in the Swakane Canyon bottom in 2011. Additional habitat restoration and maintenance activities will continue on these fields until at least 2021.
    Viewing Opportunities

    Birds

  • Birds of Prey
  • Eagles
  • Songbirds
  • Upland Birds
  • Mammals

  • Bear
  • Bighorn sheep
  • Deer
  • Small Mammals
  • Other

  • Butterflies
  • Reptiles/Amphibians
  • Wildflowers
  • How to Get Here
    Access Site #1
    Driving Directions
    North from Wenatchee on Alternate Highway 97 about 1.4 miles past Rocky Reach Dam, turn west on Swakane Canyon Road west approximately 1.2 miles to a parking area with informational kiosk. Forest Service Road 7415 continues west through the unit.
    Parking/Restroom Information
    A parking area and informational kiosk are located at the entry to the unit. Additional parking is available at pulloffs along Forest Service Road 7415 that passes through the unit. An informal parking area is also located at the junction of Forest Service Roads 7415 and 5215. No restrooms are available.
    Other Information
    Motorized vehicular travel is restricted to Swakane Canyon Road and Forest Service Road 7415. Forest Service Road 5215 (Rattlesnake Grade) is closed to motorized vehicles.
    Access Site #2
    Driving Directions
    From the junction of Highway 2/97 and Easy Street, travel.25 miles north on Easy Street to East Peters Street, then east onEast Peters Street one block to Burch Mountain Road, then north on Burch Mountain Road approximately 3.2 miles to the unit boundary.
    Parking/Restroom Information
    Parking is available at pulloffs along Burch Mountain Road that passes through the unit. No restrooms are available.
    Other Information
    Vehicular travel is restricted to Burch Mountain Road.
    Unique Features
    The Swakane Unit varies greatly in elevation and topography and as a result harbors a great diversity of wildlife and plant species. This includes several threatened and endangered plants. Bighorn sheep can be viewed on the area and provide world class hunting opportunity.
    The Pateros Unit is located north of the town of Pateros in Okanogan County and includes 1,900 acres of WDFW and Bureau of Land Management land. The south aspect and shrubsteppe habitat that dominate the area support a large number of wintering mule deer. Several draws vegetated with aspen and other riparian species are distributed throughout the area. The area supports a diversity of other wildlife species including Neotropical migrants, raptors, white-tailed deer, chukar, gray partridge, blue grouse and California quail.
    Viewing Opportunities

    Birds

  • Birds of Prey
  • Eagles
  • Songbirds
  • Upland Birds
  • Mammals

  • Bear
  • Deer
  • Small Mammals
  • Other

  • Butterflies
  • Wildflowers
  • How to Get Here
    Access Site #1
    Driving Directions
    From Pateros, on Highway 97, turn north on the first road east of the Methow River, take the first left and proceed on Bill Shaw Rd traveling about 1.5 miles from Highway 97 to the south boundary of the unit.
    Parking/Restroom Information
    Parking is available at pulloffs along Bill Shaw RoadAn informal parking area is located at a gated road about 2 miles north of Pateros on Bill Shaw Road. No restrooms are available.
    Other Information
    Late winter/early spring activities in deer winter ranges are discouraged due to their impact on wintering deer.
    Unique Features
    The Pateros Unit is a critical mule deer wintering area.
    The Entiat Unit’s 9,851 acres include lands west and northwest of the town of Entiat and in the vicinity of Oklahoma Gulch, Navarre Coulee and Knapp Coulee. Upland game birds using the area include chukar, gray partridge, blue grouse and California quail. The Entiat Unit provides critical winter range for the Chelan County mule deer herd.
    Viewing Opportunities

    Birds

  • Birds of Prey
  • Eagles
  • Songbirds
  • Upland Birds
  • Mammals

  • Bear
  • Deer
  • Small Mammals
  • Other

  • Butterflies
  • Reptiles/Amphibians
  • Wildflowers
  • How to Get Here
    Access Site #1
    Driving Directions
    From Chelan, travel south on Highway 97 A for 8.7 miles and then turn west on an unmarked dirt road to enter the wildlife area.
    Parking/Restroom Information
    Informal parking area is at end of the road. No restrooms are available.
    Access Site #2
    Driving Directions
    From the junction of Highway 97 A and Highway 971, travel north 1.25 miles and then turn east on an unmarked dirt road to enter the wildlife area. The access road is closed at 0.8 miles from Dec. 1 to May 15 to reduce disturbance to wintering mule deer.
    Parking/Restroom Information
    Parking is available at pulloffs along the access road. No restrooms are available.
    Other Information
    Late winter/early spring activities in deer winter ranges are discouraged due to their impact on wintering deer.
    The Chelan Butte Unit includes 9,097 acres of land located between Lake Chelan and the Columbia River. Bighorn sheep released in 2004 are now well established in the area provide a world class hunting opportunity. Upland game birds using the area include chukar, gray partridge, blue grouse and California quail. Pheasant releases are made each fall to provide additional hunting opportunity. Many miles of roads are closed to motorized vehicles and offer good hiking and mountain biking, skiing and snowshoeing opportunities. WDFW completed a project to restore about 100 acres of abandoned agricultural fields to shrubsteppe habitat on Chelan Butte and is in the process of restoring an additional 1,000 acres by 2021.
    Viewing Opportunities

    Birds

  • Birds of Prey
  • Eagles
  • Songbirds
  • Upland Birds
  • Mammals

  • Bear
  • Bighorn sheep
  • Deer
  • Small Mammals
  • Other

  • Butterflies
  • Reptiles/Amphibians
  • Wildflowers
  • How to Get Here
    Access Site #1
    Driving Directions
    From Highway 97 A in Chelan, turn south on Millard Street/Chelan Butte Road for 2 miles to the wildlife area.
    Parking/Restroom Information
    Parking is available at pulloffs along Chelan Butte Road. There are no restrooms.
    Other Information
    Late winter/early spring activities in deer winter ranges are discouraged due to their impact on wintering deer.
    Access Site #2
    Driving Directions
    From Chelan, travel south on Highway 97 A for 7 miles and then east on Downie Canyon Road for 1.1 miles to the wildlife area.
    Parking/Restroom Information
    Parking is available at pulloffs along Downie Canyon Road. No restrooms are available.
    Other Information
    Informational Kiosk is at the top of Downie Canyon. Late winter/early spring activities in deer winter ranges are discouraged due to their impact on wintering deer.
    Unique Features
    The area lies between the Columbia River and Lake Chelan and provides great views. One of the most popular hang gliding and parasailing sites in the world is located on Chelan Butte. The Lucas Homestead, located in Brick House Canyon, is on the National Register of Historical Places.
    The White River unit includes several small parcels, which total 415 acres west of Lake Wenatchee. It includes a wetland system promoted by a high water table. Its climate differs drastically from the rest of the Chelan Wildlife Area. About 40 inches of annual precipitation and an average of three to six feet of snow result in vegetative types more typical of what is found west of the Cascade Mountains. The unit borders the White River, which harbors several species of anadromous fish including threatened and endangered species. Protection of riparian and wetland habitat for the benefit of the fisheries resource is a priority of this unit. Mule deer, bear, cougar, blue grouse, ruffed grouse and a great variety of other species can be found on the area.
    Viewing Opportunities

    Birds

  • Birds of Prey
  • Eagles
  • Songbirds
  • Upland Birds
  • Waterfowl
  • Mammals

  • Bear
  • Deer
  • Small Mammals
  • Other

  • Butterflies
  • Reptiles/Amphibians
  • Wildflowers
  • How to Get Here
    Access Site #1
    Driving Directions
    Travel west from Leavenworth on Highway 2 about 13 miles to Coles Corner, then right on Highway 207 for 4.4 miles and turn left on Lake Wenatchee Highway for 6.1 miles to the junction of White River Road and Little Wenatchee Road. The Unit is made up of several parcels along White River Road and Little Wenatchee Road (see map).
    Parking/Restroom Information
    Informal parking is available at pullouts along White River and Little Wenatchee Roads. No restrooms are available.
    Unique Features
    The White River Unit is in a vegetative transition zone between wetter western Washington forests and the drier pine and fir habitat types of the eastern Cascades. This results in very diverse and unique vegetation and great wildlife diversity.

    Viewing Opportunities

    Birds

  • Birds of Prey
  • Eagles
  • Shorebirds
  • Songbirds
  • Upland Birds
  • Wading Birds
  • Waterfowl
  • Mammals

  • Bear
  • Bighorn sheep
  • Deer
  • Elk
  • Small Mammals
  • Other

  • Butterflies
  • Reptiles/Amphibians
  • Wildflowers
  • How to Get Here
    Access Site #1
    Driving Directions
    Drive south from Wenatchee on the Malaga/Alcoa Hwy. 13 miles to the junction of the Colockum and Tarpiscan Roads. Turn left onto the Tarpiscan Road and drive 3 miles to the end of the county road and the Colockum Wildlife Area Headquarters. Or, turn right at the Colockum/Tarpiscan Road junction, and drive 6.5 miles up the Colockum Road and enter the wildlife area.
    Parking/Restroom Information
    Motorized vehicles allowed only on green dot roads. Parking allowed within 100 ft. of green dot roads. One restroom is available at the Yoyo Rock boat launch, located 1.5 miles north of the wildlife area headquarters off Tarpiscan Road.
    Other Information
    Tarpiscan Road is currently impassable to vehicles immediately south of the wildlife area headquarters due to several large washouts.
    Access Site #2
    Driving Directions
    From the town of Ellensburg drive 6 miles east on I-90 and take the exit into the town of Kittitas. From Kittitas drive 4 miles north on the Number 81 Road to the Brick Mill Road. Drive 2 miles east on the Brick Mill Road. Turn left on the Colockum Road and drive 13 miles north to the boundary of the Colockum Wildlife Area near Colockum Pass.
    Parking/Restroom Information
    No restrooms. Rough, primitive road not recommended for passenger vehicles. Motorized vehicles allowed only on green dot roads. Parking allowed within 100 ft. of green dot roads.
    Other Information
    The Colockum Road is usually impassable by wheeled vehicles December-March. Snowmobiles not allowed on big game winter range (east of the Colockum Road, Brewton Road, Powerline Road and Colockum Road).
    Unique Features
    Spring wildflowers bloom in April and May at lower elevations. Elk viewing available near Colockum Pass in summer.
    Other Information
    Colockum roads are extremely primitive. High clearance, four-wheel drive vehicles are recommended. Carry water, supplies and a spare tire.
    The Banks Lake unit includes 44,700 BOR acres and 41 WDFW acres in the upper Grand Coulee on 27-mile-long Banks Lake. Banks Lake is a man-made impoundment for irrigation water in the Columbia Basin Irrigation Project. It is formed by the North Dam near Grand Coulee and the Dry Falls Dam near Coulee City and is filled with water from Franklin D. Roosevelt Reservoir (Lake Roosevelt). Most of the shoreline is ringed with basalt cliffs and talus slopes, the dry uplands have shallow soils and rocky outcrops with shrub-steppe habitat. Willows and Russian olives grow on the fringes of some cattail and bulrush wetland areas. There are about 23 islands in the reservoir from one to several acres in size, including basalt and granite outcroppings, shrub-steppe and wetlands. Steamboat Rock, in the northern part of the lake, is the largest of several peninsulas and is designated a Research Natural Area. Unique wildlife use can include common loons, wintering bald eagles, mule deer and peregrine falcons.
    Viewing Opportunities

    Birds

  • Birds of Prey
  • Eagles
  • Shorebirds
  • Songbirds
  • Upland Birds
  • Waterfowl
  • Mammals

  • Deer
  • Small Mammals
  • Other

  • Butterflies
  • Reptiles/Amphibians
  • Wildflowers
  • How to Get Here
    Access Site #1
    Driving Directions
    From Moses Lake take SR 17 north to the junction of SR 2 at the southwest corner of Banks Lake. Turn east (right) toward Coulee City and proceed across Dry Falls Dam. About 1/2 mile past Coulee City is the junction of Hwy.155 and SR 2. Take Hwy. 155 north along the east side of Banks Lake. Highway 155 connects to Hwy. 174 in the town of Grand Coulee at the north end of Banks Lake.
    Parking/Restroom Information
    WDFW maintains public fishing parking areas with outhouses at the southwest corner of Banks Lake and north of Million Dollar Mile (where Hwy. 155 goes through and over the basalt cliffs). There is a parking area, without an outhouse, on Hwy. 155 at the south side of Million Dollar Mile. At Osborne Bay, a few miles north of Steamboat Rock State Park, WDFW maintains a primitive road that provides access and parking around the part of the Osborne Bay that is east of Hwy. 155.

    See listing of Banks Lake Access Sites and Facility Information

    Unique Features
    Banks Lake is a man-made impoundment in a 27 mile portion of a natural coulee. Most of the 91 miles of shoreline are ringed with basalt clifs and talus slopes. There are about 23 islands in the reservoir.
    Other Information
    Public conduct rules for WDFW Lands restrict the discharge of firearms within 500 feet of the designated campgrounds for the Banks Lake Unit. See locations for all 21 WDFW designated campgrounds here.
    The 9,140 acres of the Sun Lakes unit are within the lower Grand Coulee, adjacent to Sun Lakes State Park and parts of Park, Blue, Alkali, and Lenore lakes. Glacial floods scoured and carved away millions of cubic feet of lava leaving behind a deep and long coulee rimmed by basalt cliffs. Park and Blue are popular rainbow trout fishing lakes and Lenore Lake is a quality Lahontan cutthroat trout fishery. Very little wetland vegetation exists. A stiff sage/Sandberg bluegrass community occupies most of the uplands. Big sage/Bluebunch wheatgrass occurs where there are pockets of soil. Bare rock is the most common feature of this unit. Peregrine falcons and other wildlife are found among the many spectacular geological features.
    Viewing Opportunities

    Birds

  • Birds of Prey
  • Eagles
  • Shorebirds
  • Songbirds
  • Upland Birds
  • Wading Birds
  • Waterfowl
  • Mammals

  • Deer
  • Small Mammals
  • Other

  • Butterflies
  • Reptiles/Amphibians
  • Wildflowers
  • How to Get Here
    Access Site #1
    Driving Directions
    From Moses Lake, take SR 17 north toward Soap Lake. Just north of Soap Lake, SR 17 enters the lower part of the Grand Coulee where it abuts Lenore Lake, Alkali Lake, Blue Lake and Park Lake in that order as you proceed north.

    See listing of Sun Lakes Access Sites and Facility Information

    Parking/Restroom Information
    WDFW maintains two parking areas with outhouses on Lenore Lake. They are both marked with signs on SR 17. At Alkali Lake, there is one parking area with a boat ramp and an outhouse near south end of lake. The WDFW parking area, outhouse and boat ramp for Blue Lake is on the east side near the middle of the lake. The east side access road (Blue Lake Road) connects to SR 17 just north of Alkali Lake. WDFW does not have a developed parking area on Sun Lake, but there is a public fishing area on the southeast part of the lake just north of Laurent's Resort.
    Most of the 10,982 acres of the Gloyd Seeps unit are along Crab Creek, midway between Moses Lake and the small town of Stratford to the north. A second parcel to the southwest encompasses a portion of Rocky Ford Creek. Numerous wetlands, ponds and seeps are surrounded by the older shrub-steppe uplands and basalt scablands. Fires have created grasslands along most of the area on the west side of Crab Creek. WDFW manages 172 acres of farmland within this unit. Other developments include about 18 acres of shrub plots, four diked ponds, four water control structures on four tributary creeks, several access roads and parking areas. Rocky Ford Creek and Homestead Creek are quality trout fishing waters. This unit supports one of the two remaining populations of northern leopard frogs in Washington. Sage grouse are also found here.
    Viewing Opportunities

    Birds

  • Birds of Prey
  • Eagles
  • Shorebirds
  • Songbirds
  • Upland Birds
  • Wading Birds
  • Waterfowl
  • Mammals

  • Deer
  • Small Mammals
  • Other

  • Butterflies
  • Reptiles/Amphibians
  • Wildflowers
  • How to Get Here
    Access Site #1
    Driving Directions
    From Moses Lake, take Stratford Road north toward the town of Stratford. County roads provide vehicle access from Stratford Road into the Gloyd Seeps Wildlife Area.
    Parking/Restroom Information
    WDFW maintains several parking areas accessed by County roads or primitive roads within the wildlife area. There are no outhouses. WDFW parking areas and access roads can be found at the following locations: From Stratford Road; east on Rd 7 NE just east of Crab Creek, At Road 9.5 NE on Stratford Road; on the southside of Crab Creek, On the west side of Stratford Road 1/2 mile north of Road 10 NE, One mile west of Stratford Road on Road 12 NE, One mile west of Stratford Road on Road 14 NE, Two miles west of Stratford Road on Road 16 NE and Five miles west of Stratford Road on Road 20 NE.

    See listing of Gloyd Seeps Access Sites and Facility Information

    The most striking feature of the 15,266-acre Quincy Lakes unit, west of the town of George, is the geology. It is a product of erosion of lava flows by glacial floodwaters. The many layers of basalt are exposed in towering 800-foot cliffs, isolated mesas, stair stepped benches, box canyons and potholes. Several of the potholes are filled with water that has seeped from the irrigation of the Quincy Basin farmlands upslope. These wetlands, ponds and lakes have added an important diversity to the habitat of this area. Most of this unit is well vegetated with perennial plants. Big sage/bluebunch wheatgrass is the most common plant community. There are a variety of other native shrub-steppe communities in areas where the soil is scarce, and one farm unit has been turned into a 70-acre shrub plot. A White Eatonella (Eatonella nivea) plant site near Frenchman Coulee has been designated a Natural Area by DNR. Striped whipsnakes have been observed on this unit. Several of the lakes are managed for trout fishing.
    Viewing Opportunities

    Birds

  • Birds of Prey
  • Eagles
  • Shorebirds
  • Songbirds
  • Upland Birds
  • Wading Birds
  • Waterfowl
  • Mammals

  • Deer
  • Small Mammals
  • Other

  • Butterflies
  • Reptiles/Amphibians
  • Wildflowers
  • How to Get Here
    Access Site #1
    Driving Directions
    From Quincy, take Hwy. 281 south five miles to county Road 5 NW, turn west (right)and drive three miles to Road T NW and turn south (left) on that gravel road. Proceed south 1/2 mile to the WDFW gate at the main entrance of the wildlife area. The east side of the Quincy Lakes Wildlife Area can be accessed via Hwy. 281 from Road 3 NW. There is a WDFW gravel access road at the west end of County Rd 3 NW.
    Parking/Restroom Information
    The WDFW gravel road through the wildlife area is open to vehicles from March 1st through September 30. There are several marked parking areas, camping areas, boat ramps and outhouses that are accessable from the four mile long gravel access road. Another WDFW gravel access road, at the west end of Rd 3 NW, leads to two parking areas, outhouses and boat ramps on the east ends of Burke Lake and Babcock Reservoir.

    See listing of Quincy Lakes Access Sites and Facility Information

    Other Information
    The main access road through the Quincy Lakes Wildlife Area is closed to vehicles from October 1 until March 1. Foot traffic is allowed year round.
    Access Site #2
    Driving Directions
    Frenchman Coulee Unit of Quincy Lakes Wildlife Area can be accessed by taking I-90 Exit 143 to Silica Road. About one mile north of Exit 143 on Silica Road, is the intersection of Frenchman Coulee Road. Go west (left) on Frenchman Coulee Road to access that portion of Quincy Wildlife Area.
    Parking/Restroom Information
    There are three parking areas in the Frenchman Coulee Unit. The first parking area is about one mile from Silica Road. It sometimes has a portable outhouse placed there. This parking area serves many rock climbers. The second parking area is about one mile beyond the first one. It provides parking for people that are hiking the Babcock Bench above the Columbia River. The last parking area is at the west end of Frenchman Coulee Road on the bank of the Columbia River. There is a boat ramp, an outhouse and a camping area at that location.

    See listing of Quincy Lakes Access Sites and Facility Information

    The Winchester Reservoir unit is 930 acres of land and 1,020 acres of water just north of Interstate 90 east of the town of George. The lake is actually a wide spot in the Winchester Wasteway, with an average depth of about six feet. The surrounding landscape is relatively flat with the lake in a natural low area. Most of the lake is surrounded by cattail and bulrush marsh. The uplands are a mix of tall wheatgrass or intermediate wheatgrass with big sage/bluebunch wheatgrass in some areas. Waterfowl and shorebirds dominate. County roads provide public access to the parking areas and gravel boat launches on the south and upper east sides of the lake. About 20 acres are leased for farming.
    Viewing Opportunities

    Birds

  • Birds of Prey
  • Eagles
  • Shorebirds
  • Songbirds
  • Upland Birds
  • Wading Birds
  • Waterfowl
  • Mammals

  • Deer
  • Small Mammals
  • Other

  • Butterflies
  • Reptiles/Amphibians
  • How to Get Here
    Access Site #1
    Driving Directions
    From Moses Lake, take I-90 west to Dodson Road Exit 164, turn north (right)on Dodson Road then west(left)on the North Frontage Road. Proceed west on North Frontage Road about three miles (about one mile past Road E NW), to the south entrance of the Winche
    Parking/Restroom Information
    There are primitive parking areas at the north and south ends of Winchester Reservoir Unit. WDFW has a gravel parking area with an outhouse and gravel boat ramp at the west end of County Road 3 NW.
    The 34,920-acre Desert unit was wholly desert prior to the Columbia Basin Irrigation Project. It is the lowest part of the very large Quincy Basin that once was filled with glacial floodwater. The natural basin now serves as a collector for irrigation water from upslope farmlands. Most of this water is collected in the Winchester and Frenchman Hills wasteways, which meander southeasterly across several miles of the Desert Unit and eventually empty into the southwestern part of Potholes Reservoir. The vegetation in this mosaic of wetlands and desert uplands is very diverse. In addition to naturally-occurring shrub steppe communities, many acres have been aerially seeded to non-native grasses. The wetlands and shallow ponds created by the high water table and wasteways were once occupied by native marsh vegetation, but non-native invaders like Russian olive and purple loosestrife are now taking over. While county roads provide access to much of the perimeter of this area, access to the interior is very limited. The area supports waterfowl, white pelicans, mule deer, and other wildlife. Many ponds have been isolated from the wasteways with low sand dikes to exclude carp and improve waterfowl habitat.
    Viewing Opportunities

    Birds

  • Birds of Prey
  • Eagles
  • Shorebirds
  • Songbirds
  • Upland Birds
  • Wading Birds
  • Waterfowl
  • Mammals

  • Deer
  • Small Mammals
  • Other

  • Butterflies
  • Reptiles/Amphibians
  • Wildflowers
  • How to Get Here
    Access Site #1
    Driving Directions
    From Moses Lake, take I-90 west to the Dodson Road Exit 164. Go south on Dodson Road 2 miles to Road 1 SW. Turn east (left) on Road 1 SW and go 200 yards to the WDFW access road to the Audubon Trail. Back on Dodson Road, continue south about 2 miles to the WDFW Winchester Wasteway parking area, northeast wasteway bridge. Back on Dodson Road, continue south about 5 miles to the Frenchman Hills Wasteway and WDFW parking area on the southeast side of the wasteway bridge. Back on Dodson Road, continue south about one mile to the Frenchman Hills Road. Turn east or west on that road for more WDFW Desert access roads. About 1/2 mile west of Dodson Road there is a WDFW parking area on the north side of Frenchman Hills Road that overlooks a grazed wetland locally known as 'Birdwatchers Area'. There are two more WDFW parking areas at 1 mile and 3 miles west of Dodson Road. Continue west to County Road I SW. Turn north (right) on Road I SW and go 1.5 miles to a WDFW parking area on the east (right) side of the gravel road. Turning east on Frenchman Hills Road, there are WDFW access roads with parking areas at 2 miles and at 3 miles east of Dodson Road. Continue east on Frenchman Hills Road to the intersection with Highway 262. Turn east (left) on Hwy. 262 and go 2 miles to County Road C SW. Turn north (left) on Road C SW and proceed one mile on the gravel road to enter the Desert Unit at the WDFW 'Harris Road Access'.
    Parking/Restroom Information
    At the Audubon Trail, 1/4 mile south of Road 1 SW, there is a parking area and an outhouse. At Winchester Wasteway on Dodson Road there is a large parking area with a gravel boat ramp and an outhouse. At Frenchman Hills Wasteway on Dodson Road there is a large parking area and an outhouse. The Birdwatcher's Area on Frenchman Hills Road is a small parking area with no other facilities. The parking area on Road I SW is a large gravel lot with an outhouse. The four access roads and parking areas on Frenchman Hills Road between I Road SW and Hwy. 262 are small and primitive and do not have an outhouses. WDFW maintains four parking areas on the Harris Road Access. The eastern parking area, known as Harris Road #1, is at the Winchester Wasteway and it has an outhouse and a footbridge across the wasteway. The three other parking areas, on the west fork of Harris Road Access, provide public access to sandy uplands, small ponds and seasonal wetlands. Two of those parking areas, #2 and #4, also have outhouses. The middle parking area, #3, is a primitive site that provides cartop boat access to some shallow ponds there.

    See listing of Desert Access Sites and Facility Information

    Other Information
    There are two Game Reserves in the Desert Unit; The Winchester and The Frenchman Hills Game Reserves.
    Unique Features
    Most of the Desert Unit is within a large natural basin filled with black basalt sand deposited by ice age floods. It is a unique arid 'desert' environment with a high water table, many ponds, wetlands and two major wasteway stream systems, all fed by water from the federal Columbia Basin Irrigation Project.
    The 32,820-acre Potholes Reservoir unit is formed by O'Sullivan Dam south of Moses Lake in Grant County as part of the Columbia Basin Irrigation Project. Reservoir water levels are subject to wide fluctuations because the project’s purpose is to gather wastewater and return flows from irrigated lands upstream and store water for reuse on farmland downstream. At full pool in spring there are 20,000 acres of surface water. The dam initially inundated the Crab Creek channel and about 800 small ponds scattered among the sand dunes of the area. With several thousand acres of water covering the sand dune area, perhaps 1,000 islands were formed in the north and west parts of the reservoir. These seasonally flooded areas currently support a small forest of willow trees. The higher elevation wetlands on the northern and western fringes of the reservoir have cattail and bulrush communities. The western part still has many active sand dunes with shrub steppe vegetation, except for the wetland areas along the Winchester and Frenchman Hills wasteways. The Desert unit borders on the west. The east side of the unit is mostly sand, gravel and round rock soil with shrub steppe vegetation bordered by irrigated farmland. The southern area, adjacent to O'Sullivan Dam, is mostly basalt outcroppings with big sage and bluebunch wheatgrass occurring where soil exists. The original Crab Creek channel is exposed just below O'Sullivan Dam and west of Potholes Canal, the outlet of the reservoir. Wildlife use of this unit includes waterfowl, wintering bald eagles, mule deer and one of the two known populations of northern leopard frogs in Washington.
    Viewing Opportunities

    Birds

  • Birds of Prey
  • Eagles
  • Shorebirds
  • Songbirds
  • Upland Birds
  • Wading Birds
  • Waterfowl
  • Mammals

  • Deer
  • Small Mammals
  • Other

  • Butterflies
  • Reptiles/Amphibians
  • Wildflowers
  • How to Get Here
    Access Site #1
    Driving Directions
    From Moses Lake, Take I-90 west to the Mae Valley Road Exit 174, turn south on Mae Valley Road and cross the freeway overpass to the intersection of South Frontage Road. Turn east (left) and then straight ahead 1/4 mile to Sage Road and another 1/4 mile to Sand Dunes Road. Go south on Sand Dunes Road to access the two Moses Lake Outlets and the east Crab Creek Arm of Potholes Reservoir. Back at the end of Mae Valley Road, Turn west (right) on South Frontage Road and travel west two miles to Road D.5 NE. Take this gravel road south a couple miles to access four dead end roads with parking areas in the 'North Potholes' portion of the Potholes Unit. Farther west on South Frontage Road, there is a primitive WDFW parking area at the south end of county Road A SE, 2.5 miles south of the South Frontage Road. There are no access roads for the western portion of the Potholes Unit. The south O'Sullivan Dam and Lind Coulee portions of the Potholes Unit are accessed from Moses Lake on SR 17, 1.5 miles south of I-90 Exit 179. Take county Road M SE from SR 17, 5.5 miles south to the WDFW Lind Coulee parking area on the northwest side of the wasteway bridge. Just south of Lind Coulee, Road M SE intersects with Highway 262. Turn west (right) on that highway to access more WDFW roads and parking areas on the lower Lind Coulee. Continue west on Hwy. 262 to the the Glen Williams parking area at the southeast corner of Potholes Reservoir. Highway 262 crosses the O'Sullivan Dam from Glen Williams and Potholes Canal on the east end to MarDon Resort at the west end of the dam. Just 1/2 mile west of MarDon Resort is the WDFW parking area known as Blythe Access. West of Blythe Access is the entrance to Potholes State Park.
    Parking/Restroom Information
    The two WDFW parking areas on Sand Dunes Road, at the north and south Moses Lake outlets, both have large parking lots with outhouses. There are no outhouses in the North Potholes area or at the Road A SE parking area. The parking area at Lind Coulee Wasteway on Road M SE is large and has two outhouses and a concrete boat ramp. The Glen Williams parking area on Hwy. 262, is also a large, partially paved, parking lot with two outhouses and two concrete boat ramps. The Blythe Access has two outhouses, some pavement, an overnight parking area, a day use parking area and a concrete boat ramp.

    See listing of Potholes Reservoir Access Sites and Facility Information

    Other Information
    The North Potholes Game Reserve is within the 'North Potholes' portion of the Potholes Unit.
    Unique Features
    The Potholes Reservoir was created by the construction of O'Sullivan Dam to impound water for the federal Columbia Basin Irrigation Project. The 20,000 acre reservoir and adjoining public lands, provide great wildlife habitat for many species and offers many public recreation opportunities.
    The Seep Lakes unit is 4,877 acres of channeled scablands south of Potholes Reservoir. It is mostly rolling countryside with basalt outcroppings forming cliffs, mesas, box canyons and potholes. Many of the canyons and potholes are filled with water that has seeped from Potholes Reservoir to the north. A few lakes are actually wide spots in the Potholes Canal, which borders the west side. A long history of range fire has turned almost all of this area into grassland comprised mostly of Sandberg bluegrass and cheatgrass. A few protected pockets contain big sage and bluebunch wheatgrass or needle and thread grass. Washington ground squirrels are found here. Most of the lakes have steep and rocky shorelines with very little wetland habitat. WDFW maintains many miles of graveled access roads as well as several boat launches and parking areas primarily for public fishing.
    Viewing Opportunities

    Birds

  • Birds of Prey
  • Shorebirds
  • Songbirds
  • Upland Birds
  • Wading Birds
  • Waterfowl
  • Mammals

  • Deer
  • Small Mammals
  • Other

  • Butterflies
  • Reptiles/Amphibians
  • Wildflowers
  • How to Get Here
    Access Site #1
    Driving Directions
    From Moses Lake, Go south on SR 17, about two miles south of I-90 Exit 179, to county Road M SE. Turn south on Road M SE and proceed six miles to State Highway 262. Turn east (left) on Hwy. 262 and go 1/2 mile the gravel road on the south (right). This gravel road is known as the 'Seep Lakes Road' and it provides public access through the Seep Lakes Unit to the McManamon Road on the south end.
    Parking/Restroom Information
    There are several parking areas in the Seep Lakes Unit. There are outhouses and boat ramps at the Heart Lake, Windmill Lake and Long Lake parking areas.

    See listing of Seep Lakes Access Sites and Facility Information

    Access Site #2
    Driving Directions
    The north end of Warden Lake is accessed via Hwy. 262 about two miles east of the Road M SE intersection.
    Parking/Restroom Information
    There is a WDFW access road and parking area with an outhouse and gravel boat ramp at the upper end of Warden Lake.

    See listing of Seep Lakes Access Sites and Facility Information

    Unique Features
    The Seep Lakes Unit is within the 'channeled scablands' of Eastern Washington, that were created by ice age floods during the Pleistocene Epoch.
    The Goose Lakes unit is 3,546 acres just south of Potholes Reservoir. It consists of channeled scabland created by glacial floodwaters, and basalt outcroppings forming cliffs, mesas, box canyons and potholes. One major canyon is filled with water that has seeped from the Potholes Reservoir north of this unit. Two low rock dams were built in the 1950's to create Upper and Lower Goose lakes. A long history of range fire has turned almost all of this area into grassland. Both lakes have steep, rocky shorelines with very little wetland habitat. WDFW maintains graveled access roads and two boat launches and parking areas primarily for public fishing. A small stream flows southward from Lower Goose Lake and feeds Black Lake. The outlet of Black Lake flows into Crab Creek on Columbia National Wildlife Refuge lands. Another small lake, Shoofly Lake, is just west of Black Lake and is fed by seepage from the western part of this unit. A long narrow wetland and big sage/bluebunch wheatgrass exist on the west side of this unit.
    Viewing Opportunities

    Birds

  • Birds of Prey
  • Eagles
  • Shorebirds
  • Songbirds
  • Upland Birds
  • Wading Birds
  • Waterfowl
  • Mammals

  • Deer
  • Small Mammals
  • Other

  • Butterflies
  • Reptiles/Amphibians
  • Wildflowers
  • How to Get Here
    Access Site #1
    Driving Directions
    From Moses Lake, Go south on SR 17, about 1.5 miles south of I-90 Exit 179, to county Road M SE. Take Road M SE six miles to State Highway 262. Turn west on Hwy. 262 and go two miles to the gravel road at the southeast end of O'Sullivan Dam. This gravel road leads into the Columbia National Wildlife Refuge. About three miles south of Hwy. 262, the Columbia National Wildlife Refuge road connects to WDFW's Upper Goose Lake access road. This access road ends on the south side of the lake, about one mile from the intersection.
    Parking/Restroom Information
    The Upper Goose Lake access road leads to a primitive parking area with a concrete boat ramp on the south side of Upper Goose Lake.
    Access Site #2
    Driving Directions
    From Moses Lake, proceed to Hwy. 262 as described above. Take Hwy. 262 west from Road M SE about seven miles, across O'Sullivan Dam and past MarDon Resort, to county Road H SE. Take Road H SE over the west end of Frenchman Hills and south about four miles to Kulm Road. Turn east (left) on Kulm Road and proceed one mile to the entrance of the Goose Lakes Unit. This WDFW maintained gravel road provides vehicle access to Lower Goose Lake. There are two primitive parking areas and a gravel boat ramp at the lake.
    Unique Features
    The Goose Lakes Unit is within the scenic Drumheller Channeled Scablands where some unique geological features can be seen.
    The Lower Crab Creek unit is 24,958 acres along the north side of the Saddle Mountains, east of the Columbia River and southwest of Royal City. The wetlands and riparian areas along the creek and the seep ponds and uplands above the creek valley provide habitat for many species of wildlife. A native black greasewood and saltgrass community near Smyrna has been designated a Natural Area Preserve. Large flocks of migrating sandhill cranes use this area and ferruginous hawks historically nested here. Lenice and Nunnally lakes are quality trout fishing lakes. The abandoned Milwaukee Railroad right-of-way (part of the John Wayne Trail) traverses the length of this valley. About 110 acres of WDFW land on the east end is leased for farming. Other developments include a five-acre shrub plot, a few lakes with low dikes, access roads and parking areas. An Off Road Vehicle Area on the west end is managed by the Department of Natural Resources (DNR).
    Viewing Opportunities

    Birds

  • Birds of Prey
  • Eagles
  • Shorebirds
  • Songbirds
  • Upland Birds
  • Wading Birds
  • Waterfowl
  • Mammals

  • Deer
  • Small Mammals
  • Other

  • Butterflies
  • Reptiles/Amphibians
  • Wildflowers
  • How to Get Here
    Access Site #1
    Driving Directions
    From Moses Lake, Go west on I-90 to the Dodson Road Exit 164. Go south on Dodson Road 15 miles to State Highway 26. On Hwy. 26 go west two miles from Dodson Road to county Road E SW. Turn south (left) on Road E SW and proceed south four miles to the intersection of Lower Crab Creek Road. Follow this road west 16 miles, through the Lower Crab Creek Unit, to State Highway 243 on the Columbia River.
    Parking/Restroom Information
    WDFW has five primitive access roads and small parking areas that are accessible from the Lower Crab Creek Road. Nearer the west end of the unit, the Lenice Lake and the Nunnally Lake parking areas are larger, gravelled and both have an outhouse.

    See listing of Lower Crab Creek Access Sites and Facility Information

    Unique Features
    The Lower Crab Creek Unit lies within the valley of lower Crab Creek along the steep north side of the Saddle Mountains. The wetlands and riparian areas along the creek and the seep ponds and uplands on the bench north of the creek, provide a diverse habitat for many species of wildlife.
    The 3,202 acres of the Priest Rapids unit are along the east bank of the Columbia River south of Sentinel Gap. The land is relatively flat and during ancient glacial floods was intermittently under water, resulting in a thin layer of soil covering a mostly river cobble substrate. This unit has three large peninsulas that create sheltered backwater pools. The water level in the Priest Rapids Pool is subject to frequent and dramatic fluctuations, but the riverbanks are slowly developing riparian habitat. The shallow back water sloughs and the ponds of the WB-48A Wasteway are fringed with willows, Russian olives and other trees. In the 1960's, many woody shrubs were planted in the moist areas around the middle and lower peninsulas. An irrigated field was also developed at that time for a goose brooding pasture. The uplands here are mostly a poor quality mix of rabbitbrush and cheatgrass. A few scattered occurrences of big sage or bitterbrush and needle and thread grass can be found on the upper peninsula. A WDFW public parking area and boat launch is near the middle of this unit.
    Viewing Opportunities

    Birds

  • Birds of Prey
  • Eagles
  • Shorebirds
  • Songbirds
  • Upland Birds
  • Wading Birds
  • Waterfowl
  • Mammals

  • Deer
  • Small Mammals
  • Other

  • Butterflies
  • Reptiles/Amphibians
  • Wildflowers
  • How to Get Here
    Access Site #1
    Driving Directions
    From I-90 Exit 137 at the east end of the Vantage Bridge, take Hwy. 26 one mile to Hwy. 243. Go south on Hwy. 243 about 16 miles to county Road 26 SW. Turn west (right) on Road 26 SW and go one mile to the WDFW Priest Rapids Unit access road at the intersection of the county Roads 26 SW and U SW.

    See listing of Priest Rapids Access Sites and Facility Information

    Parking/Restroom Information
    One mile into the Priest Rapids Unit from the end of Road 26 SW, WDFW has a large parking area with an outhouse and a concrete boat ramp on the left bank of the Columbia River.
    Access Site #2
    Driving Directions
    From the intersection of the county Roads 26 SW and U SW as described above, take Road U SW north two miles to the west end of county Road 24 SW where there is a very primitive WDFW access road leading west into the north part of the Priest Rapids Unit.
    Parking/Restroom Information
    There are three small spots along the primitive (rocky) access road where vehicles can pull off or turn around. There are no improvements in this area.
    The Sprague Lake unit is 675 acres of mainly wetlands, with good riparian habitat along part of the lake. Cow Creek flows through the western portion of the unit. The wetlands are protected under the federal Wetlands Reserve Program (WRP). The uplands are protected under a WDFW Conservation Easement with neighboring Hercules Ranch. Uplands have historically been grazed by cattle, but are in fair condition, with stiff sage and Sandburg bluegrass dominating the numerous shallow soil rock outcroppings, and big sage with basin wild rye occupying the small depressions with deeper soils. Wildlife use is diverse, from songbirds to mule deer. WDFW maintains a boat launch and parking area.
    Viewing Opportunities

    Birds

  • Birds of Prey
  • Eagles
  • Shorebirds
  • Songbirds
  • Upland Birds
  • Wading Birds
  • Waterfowl
  • Mammals

  • Deer
  • Small Mammals
  • Other

  • Butterflies
  • Reptiles/Amphibians
  • Wildflowers
  • How to Get Here
    Access Site #1
    Driving Directions
    From Moses Lake, Go east on I-90 about 66 miles to Exit 245. Take Exit 245 to Hwy. 23 and go south on Hwy. 23 about one mile to the street that goes through the town of Sprague. At the west side of Sprague, Main Street becomes Max Harder Road through Lincoln County then Danekas Road in Adams County. Follow this road west about seven miles from Sprague to the gravel access road that leads into the east end of the WDFW's Sprague Lake Unit.
    Parking/Restroom Information
    The gravel access road described above provides vehicle access to two parking areas, an interpretive trail, a gravel boat ramp and an outhouse.
    Unique Features
    The east end of the Sprague Lake Unit boasts an interpretive trial with a kiosk, informational signs and a gazebo covered veiwing platform. 1000 feet of ADA compliant trail is available.
    The Billy Clapp Lake unit is 4,000 acres along what was originally called Long Lake Reservoir, but re-named in honor of one of the originators of the Columbia Basin Irrigation Project. The natural coulee was dammed on the lower south end (Pinto Dam) to create the reservoir. Water cascades into the upper end of the reservoir from the Main Canal creating Summer Falls. Basalt cliffs of varying heights encompass the reservoir. Most of the shoreline is too steep and rocky to support wetland or riparian vegetation, and the uplands are a mix of poor quality gravelly soils and basalt outcroppings. Vegetation varies from the fire-caused cheatgrass or bunchgrass communities to native woody shrubs on talus slopes. BOR maintains public parking, and boat launching is available on the north end of the lake. The Stratford Game Reserve encompasses nearly all the public land in this unit. Originally designated to provide a resting area for migrating waterfowl each fall, public use and changing migration patterns have made the Game Reserve less effective.
    Viewing Opportunities

    Birds

  • Birds of Prey
  • Eagles
  • Shorebirds
  • Songbirds
  • Upland Birds
  • Wading Birds
  • Waterfowl
  • Mammals

  • Elk
  • Small Mammals
  • Other

  • Butterflies
  • Reptiles/Amphibians
  • Wildflowers
  • How to Get Here
    Access Site #1
    Driving Directions
    From Moses Lake and the intersection of Hwy. 17 and Stratford Road; Go north on Stratford Road about 20 miles and then through the small town of Stratford. Go across Hwy. 28 to county Road J NE and proceed north on Road J NE to the end of the road, about 2.5 miles, where WDFW maintains a paved parking area with an outhouse, a courtesy dock and two concrete boat ramps on Billy Clapp Reservoir.
    Parking/Restroom Information
    In addition to the paved parking area described above, there is a primitive parking area on the east side of the Billy Clapp Reservoir that is about two miles from the west end of county Road 26 NE off of county Road Q NE.
    Other Information
    Nearly all of the Billy Clapp Unit is within the Billy Clapp Game Reserve.
    Unique Features
    Billy Clapp Reservoir is a natural coulee with high basalt walls. The dam at the south end impounds water for the federal Columbia Basin Irrigation Project. The U.S. Bureau of Reclamation maintains a day use park at the north end of the reservoir which is accessed from Pinto Ridge Road.
    This 280-acre unit is located adjacent to the WDFW Cowlitz Trout Hatchery near Winlock. It is managed for black-tailed deer and riparian forest habitats. This unit has several large fields that are mowed and maintained as forage fields.
    Viewing Opportunities

    Birds

  • Birds of Prey
  • Eagles
  • Songbirds
  • Wading Birds
  • Waterfowl
  • Mammals

  • Deer
  • Small Mammals
  • How to Get Here
    Access Site #1
    Driving Directions
    From I-5: East on Highway 12 (6.6 mi), Turn right at Tucker Road. (1.0 mi), Slight left at Classee Rd. (2.1 mi), Turn left at Spencer Rd N. (0.9 mi), Turn right onto Hatchery Rd.
    Parking/Restroom Information
    Parking and restrooms available at the boat ramp
    Other Information
    None
    Unique Features
    This unit offers: bank fishing, bird watching and a boat launch.
    The 243-acre Davis Lake Unit is located east of Morton. It is managed for black-tailed deer, waterfowl, salmonids and riparian forest habitat. In addition to several large fields that are mowed to maintain forage values, there is a large pond, wetlands and forested/shrub corridors.
    Viewing Opportunities

    Birds

  • Birds of Prey
  • Eagles
  • Songbirds
  • Waterfowl
  • Mammals

  • Deer
  • Elk
  • Small Mammals
  • How to Get Here
    Access Site #1
    Driving Directions
    From I-5: Head east on US Highway 12 (31.0 mi), turn left at 2nd St/SR 7 at Morton (0.4 mi), turn right at Main St and continue on Davis Lake Rd (2.2 mi)
    Parking/Restroom Information
    Limited parking No restrooms
    Other Information
    No restrictions
    Unique Features
    Good area to observe wintering waterfowl and local elk.
    The 415-acre Kiona Creek unit is located off Savio Road west of Randle. It is managed for black-tailed deer, dabbling ducks, and other riparian forest and forested wetland habitat species. There are three perennial creeks (Squaw, Kiona and Oliver) that have been largely altered to drain water from the agricultural fields that comprise the western portion of the unit. Squaw and Oliver creeks supply water to the large wetland area that comprises the eastern portion of the unit. In 2004, a wetland restoration plan was completed to optimize the habitat value and restore hydrology to more natural conditions.
    Viewing Opportunities

    Birds

  • Birds of Prey
  • Eagles
  • Songbirds
  • Waterfowl
  • Mammals

  • Bear
  • Deer
  • Elk
  • Small Mammals
  • Other

  • Spawning Salmon
  • How to Get Here
    Access Site #1
    Driving Directions
    From I-5: Head east on US Highway 12 (45.8 mi), turn right at Savio Rd (331 ft), turn left at Savio Rd E (0.1 mi)
    Parking/Restroom Information
    Limited Parking No restrooms
    Other Information
    No Restrictions
    Unique Features
    Salmon spawn in Kiona Creek and it is a pleasant walk through a mixed decidious / conifer forest to the forage fields where elk and deer can be observed.
    Other Information
    Some hunting occurs on this unit during legal seasons so safe practices should be observed when visiting.
    The Kosmos unit is 750 acres on the east end of Riffe Lake. It is managed for black-tailed deer, bald eagles, and waterfowl, and riparian forest, riparian shrub and emergent wetland habitats in general. In addition to several large fields that are hayed by contractors to maintain forage values, there are ponds and forest/shrub corridors. Three perennial creeks that flow into this unit are managed for cavity-nesting species and salmonids. A proposed project to create a 40-acre impoundment will provide additional emergent wetland habitat to benefit dabbling ducks, amphibians, and other wildlife. Pen-reared pheasants are released for fall hunting. A hang-glider landing zone is located along the dirt shoreline of Riffe Lake.
    Viewing Opportunities

    Birds

  • Birds of Prey
  • Eagles
  • Shorebirds
  • Songbirds
  • Upland Birds
  • Waterfowl
  • Mammals

  • Bear
  • Deer
  • Elk
  • Small Mammals
  • Other

  • Reptiles/Amphibians
  • How to Get Here
    Access Site #1
    Driving Directions
    From I-5: Head east on US Highway 12 (36.3 mi), Turn right at Kosmos Rd (0.2 mi), Take sharp left at Champion Haul Rd (1.8 mi)
    Parking/Restroom Information
    Parking available Restroom available
    Other Information
    No restrictions
    Unique Features
    Nearby boat launch. This unit is a Pheasant release site
    Other Information
    Hunting occurs on this unit during legal seasons so safe practices should be observed when visiting.
    As mitigation for the Cowlitz River hydroelectric projects, Tacoma Public Utilities has purchased a 60 to 300 foot buffer along the entire shoreline of Mayfield Reservoir. The upland is mainly residential development with access to the buffer primarily by water. The reservoir is well known for its water sports and tiger miskie and rainbow trout fishery.
    Viewing Opportunities

    Birds

  • Birds of Prey
  • Eagles
  • Shorebirds
  • Songbirds
  • Wading Birds
  • Waterfowl
  • Mammals

  • Deer
  • Elk
  • Small Mammals
  • Other

  • Reptiles/Amphibians
  • How to Get Here
    Access Site #1
    Driving Directions
    From I-5: Head east on Highway 12 (16.9 mi), Take sharp left onto Beach Rd (0.30 mi).
    Parking/Restroom Information
    Parking & Restrooms
    Other Information
    Day Use -- park and boat ramp Camping
    Unique Features
    Birdwatching Fishing Waterfowl hunting Waterskiing
    Other Information
    The buffer areas are almost exclusively accessed by boat. There are some areas where the lands can be access from shore but parking would be very limited.
    The 1,320-acre Mossyrock unit is located northeast of Mossyrock. It is managed for black-tailed deer, waterfowl, and riparian forest habitats. The unit has several large fields, several ponds and several riparian forest corridors. The fields are hayed by contractors and maintained as forage fields.
    Viewing Opportunities

    Birds

  • Birds of Prey
  • Eagles
  • Shorebirds
  • Songbirds
  • Wading Birds
  • Waterfowl
  • Mammals

  • Bear
  • Deer
  • Elk
  • Small Mammals
  • How to Get Here
    Access Site #1
    Driving Directions
    From I-5: Head east on Highway 12 (20.2 mi), Turn right into Mossyrock / Williams St. (0.4 mi), Turn left onto E St. which becomes Mossyrock Rd E (2.7 mi), continue onto Ajlune Rd (0.3 mi), Turn left onto Young Rd (0.7 mi)
    Parking/Restroom Information
    Parking limited No restrooms
    Other Information
    No restrictions
    Unique Features
    Activities at this unit include: Hiking via a loop trail, birdwatching, view of the Mossyrock Dam.
    The Peterman Ridge unit is the largest on the Cowlitz Wildlife Area, with 6,840 acres south of Morton. It is managed for the pileated woodpecker (a sensitive species), black-tailed deer, and Douglas squirrels. Its forested wetland areas on Peterman Ridge also provide habitat for beaver, amphibians and other wetland- dependent species. Wildlife use throughout the unit is diverse, including elk, black bear, cougar, grouse, and turkey.
    Viewing Opportunities

    Birds

  • Birds of Prey
  • Eagles
  • Songbirds
  • Upland Birds
  • Mammals

  • Bear
  • Deer
  • Elk
  • Small Mammals
  • Other

  • Butterflies
  • Reptiles/Amphibians
  • Wildflowers
  • How to Get Here
    Access Site #1
    Driving Directions
    From I-5: Head east on Highway 12 (27.3mi), Turn right onto Highland Valley Road (404ft), Continue on Peterman Hill Road (0.9mi), Turn left into trailhead parking lot.
    Parking/Restroom Information
    Parking at trailhead Restrooms at trailhead
    Other Information
    Vehicular traffic may be restricted during periods of high fire risk.
    Unique Features
    There is approximately 10 miles of multiuse trail. The trail is composed of single track trail connecting forest roads. A variety of habitats and species can be found on this 6,855 acre unit -- the largest unit on the Cowlitz Wildlife Area. There are trout fishing opportunities on this unit as well.
    Other Information
    Logging traffic is possible throughout the year so caution is advised. This is also a popular location for fall big game hunts so non-hunting users should take appropriate precautions.
    As mitigation for the Cowlitz River hydroelectric projects, Tacoma Public Utilities has purchased a 60 to 300 foot buffer along the entire shoreline of Riffe Reservoir. The upland is mainly in private timber ownership and access to the buffer is primarily by water. Large wood within the reservoir precludes water sport activities but the reservoir is well known for its trout and landlocked coho fishery.
    Viewing Opportunities

    Birds

  • Birds of Prey
  • Eagles
  • Shorebirds
  • Songbirds
  • Wading Birds
  • Waterfowl
  • Mammals

  • Bear
  • Deer
  • Elk
  • Small Mammals
  • Other

  • Reptiles/Amphibians
  • How to Get Here
    Access Site #1
    Driving Directions
    From I-5: Head east on Highway 12 (36.3mi), Turn right onto Kosmos Road (0.2mi), Turn sharp left onto Champion Haul Road 100 (3.8mi), Turn right into Tacoma Power's Taidnapam Park.
    Parking/Restroom Information
    Parking, restrooms and boat launch facilities located inside the parks.
    Other Information
    Access to the park is day use only unless staying at the park. If you are not a registered guest of the campground a nominal fee is charged for parking at the Taidnapam fishing bridge during weekend and holiday periods.
    Unique Features
    Unlike the buffer on Mayfield Lake, Riffe Lake's buffers are predominately bordered by private commercial timberlands. The buffer zone provides diversity of forage and cover not found in the adjacent clearcuts making this area a vital habitat component for local wildlife. Fishing for landlocked coho (silvers) is a favorite pastime of those visiting this area as well as hang gliding and windsurfing. There is also a bass fishing competition on this lake annually.
    Other Information
    The buffer zone is best accessed via boat though some locations may be accessible via logging road. Two full service campgrounds can be found on Riffe Lake. The campgrounds are owned and operated by Tacoma Power and both have boat launching facilities.
    The 418-acre Spears unit south of Randle is managed for black-tailed deer, dabbling ducks, emergent wetland, forested wetland, riparian forest and riparian shrub habitat. A large pond was created by the installation of a dike to retain water for mill operations prior to WDFW management. Two creeks flow through the unit and converge near the western boundary before draining into the Cowlitz River. Siler Creek, which flows along the southeastern boundary of the unit, is diked to keep water out of adjacent agricultural fields.
    Viewing Opportunities

    Birds

  • Birds of Prey
  • Songbirds
  • Waterfowl
  • Mammals

  • Bear
  • Deer
  • Elk
  • Small Mammals
  • Other

  • Reptiles/Amphibians
  • How to Get Here
    Access Site #1
    Driving Directions
    From I-5: Head east on Highway 12 (48.3mi), Turn right onto State Route 131 (2.0mi), Turn left onto Spears Road (0.7mi), pull out and kiosk on the left hand side of the road.
    Parking/Restroom Information
    Parking limited No restroom
    Other Information
    No restrictions
    Unique Features
    The emergent wetland in front of you is dominated by reed canarygrass -- an introduced invasive species. Historically, this site would have looked much different and efforts to restore this area to those historic conditions are currently underway.
    The Swofford Pond unit covers 300 acres south of Riffe Lake and southeast of Mossyrock. It is managed for elk, black-tailed deer, waterfowl, and riparian forest habitat. This unit has several large fields, a pond and several riparian forest corridors. The fields are hayed by contractors and maintained as forage fields. The southern end borders industrial timberlands located on a steep slope.
    Viewing Opportunities

    Birds

  • Birds of Prey
  • Eagles
  • Songbirds
  • Waterfowl
  • Mammals

  • Bear
  • Deer
  • Elk
  • Small Mammals
  • Other

  • Reptiles/Amphibians
  • How to Get Here
    Access Site #1
    Driving Directions
    From I-5: Head east on US-12 (20.2 mi), Turn right at Mossyrock / Williams St (0.4 mi), Turn left at E State St (0.5 mi), Continue on Mossyrock Rd E (2.2 mi), Slight right at Swofford Rd (0.3 mi), Slight left to stay on Swofford Rd (1.4 mi), Turn left at Green Mountain Rd (0.4 mi), Turn right to stay on Green Mountain Rd (0.1 mi)
    Parking/Restroom Information
    Limited parking Portable restroom near boat ramp
    Other Information
    No camping, stays limited to 8 hours.
    Unique Features
    An in / out trail runs along the south shore of the lake and is accessed near the boat launch. This trail can be wet at times so appropriate clothing is advised. Elk are prevalent on this unit and the lakes provides for some of the largest waterfowl populations on the wildlife area. This is a popular fishing site with abundant populations of warmwater species and trout. A boat launch can be accessed on the east end of the lake and take note -- internal combustion engines are prohibited.
    The 850-acre Chinook unit is east of Ilwaco near the mouth of the Columbia River in Pacific County. The property focus is estuary restoration.
    Viewing Opportunities

    Birds

  • Birds of Prey
  • Eagles
  • Songbirds
  • Upland Birds
  • Wading Birds
  • Waterfowl
  • Mammals

  • Deer
  • Elk
  • Small Mammals
  • Other

  • Butterflies
  • Reptiles/Amphibians
  • How to Get Here
    Access Site #1
    Driving Directions
    From Chinook, drive approximately .5 miles North on Hwy 101 to intersection with Lingenfelter road. Drive East on Lingenfelter road .2 miles to undeveloped parking area on North side of road.
    Parking/Restroom Information
    Unimproved parking No Restrooms
    Access Site #2
    Driving Directions
    From Chinook, drive approximately 2 miles North on Hwy 101. There is a unimproved parking area on the East side of the highway.
    Parking/Restroom Information
    Unimproved parking No Restrooms
    Unique Features
    A Fresh water wetland, riparian habitat, and salt-water estuary restoration project is in progress at this site. Waterfowl, elk, deer, and pheasant are hunted during established seasons. This site also offers an excellent opportunity for bird watching. Pheasant release area.
    Other Information
    No overnight camping or parking allowed. Pheasant release area.
    The Duck Lake unit is located on the north end of Ocean Shores and is comprised of 40 acres surrounding Duck Lake.
    Viewing Opportunities

    Birds

  • Birds of Prey
  • Eagles
  • Songbirds
  • Upland Birds
  • Wading Birds
  • Waterfowl
  • Mammals

  • Deer
  • Small Mammals
  • Other

  • Reptiles/Amphibians
  • How to Get Here
    Access Site #1
    Driving Directions
    This area is located near the city of Ocean Shores. It has no developed access and no established parking area.
    Parking/Restroom Information
    No established parking No restrooms
    Unique Features
    Lake and wetland
    Other Information
    No overnight camping or parking.
    The 41-acre Elk River unit is located along the south side of Grays Harbor, three miles south of Westport in Grays Harbor County. The focus for this unit is estuary, tide flat and salt marsh restoration.
    Viewing Opportunities

    Birds

  • Birds of Prey
  • Eagles
  • Shorebirds
  • Songbirds
  • Wading Birds
  • Waterfowl
  • Mammals

  • Deer
  • Elk
  • Small Mammals
  • Other

  • Reptiles/Amphibians
  • How to Get Here
    Access Site #1
    Driving Directions
    This area is located near the city of Westport. It has no developed access and no established parking area.
    Parking/Restroom Information
    No established parking. No restrooms.
    Unique Features
    This area is a popular waterfowl hunting and birding location.
    Other Information
    No overnight camping or parking.
    The 890-acre Humptulips-Grass Creek unit is located in North Bay at the confluence of the Humptulips River, Grass Creek and Grays Harbor in Grays Harbor County. It is managed for tidal channel and estuary preservation in North Bay, salmon recovery and waterfowl habitat.
    Viewing Opportunities

    Birds

  • Birds of Prey
  • Eagles
  • Marine Birds
  • Shorebirds
  • Songbirds
  • Upland Birds
  • Wading Birds
  • Waterfowl
  • Mammals

  • Deer
  • Small Mammals
  • Other

  • Reptiles/Amphibians
  • How to Get Here
    Access Site #1
    Driving Directions
    North from Hoquiam 10.4 mi. on Hwy 109, just before the Humptulips River turn left at Public Fishing Sign, access is at end of gravel rd
    Parking/Restroom Information
    Improved parking area at boat launch Restrooms available
    Unique Features
    This area is located near the mouth of the Humptulips River estuary. No maintained trails exist. Best accessed by boat or by the adventuring brush buster. Area is a popular water fowling and fishing site with excellent birding opportunities.
    Other Information
    No overnight camping or parking.
    The Johns River unit is 1,500 acres located 10 miles south of Aberdeen in Grays Harbor County. The property is managed primarily for waterfowl habitat and compatible recreation.

    As the waters of Johns River flow into Grays Harbor they deposit sediments that have built the salt-marsh estuary. Extensive mudflats adjoin prime freshwater cedar swamp found behind old dikes. Forest-covered hillside uplands slope in from the east and west. The several retaining dikes allow some dryland agriculture for elk and waterfowl. The most common mammals are Roosevelt elk, black-tailed deer, black bear, coyote, bobcat, muskrat, and rabbits. Birds are mostly ducks, geese, and shorebirds. A nesting Caspian tern colony is nearby and makes use of the Johns River. Crows, great blue herons, hummingbirds, robins, warblers, goldfinches, swallows, snipe, gulls, and many other small birds abound, along with forest grouse and band-tailed pigeon. Streams support whitefish, trout, and salmon.

    A visitor parking area, boat launch, and gated access roads and trails provide largely a walk-in experience. Hunting occurs for deer, waterfowl, elk, bear, band-tailed pigeon, and forest grouse. Waterfowl hunting is particularly popular and successful on the tidelands on nearby Markham Island. Fishing is widespread for whitefish, rainbow and cutthroat trout, sea run cutthroat, and several races of salmon. Hiking and wildlife watching trips are common on the dikes and the established trail system.

    Viewing Opportunities

    Birds

  • Birds of Prey
  • Eagles
  • Marine Birds
  • Shorebirds
  • Songbirds
  • Upland Birds
  • Wading Birds
  • Waterfowl
  • Mammals

  • Bear
  • Deer
  • Elk
  • Small Mammals
  • Other

  • Butterflies
  • Reptiles/Amphibians
  • Wildflowers
  • How to Get Here
    Access Site #1
    Driving Directions
    Drive West from Aberdeen on Hwy 105 approximately 11 miles, turn Left .1 mi. on John's River Road, Left on Game Farm Rd .1 mi. to parking area.
    Parking/Restroom Information
    Restrooms available Improved parking area.
    Access Site #2
    Driving Directions
    Drive .7 miles towards Aberdeen form intersection of Hwy 105 and Johns River Road. Turn east into undeveloped parking area.
    Parking/Restroom Information
    No Restrooms. Unimproved parking area.
    Unique Features
    The Johns River Wildlife Area is a 1500 acres piece of land that lies 12 miles southwest of Aberdeen in Grays Harbor County. Two main tributaries flow into Johns River on the property; Beaver Creek on the east side, and Gold Creek on the south. Topography
    Other Information
    No overnight camping or parking.
    The 217-acre Nemah River-Estuary unit is located 15.5 miles southwest of South Bend in Pacific County. This property contains important tidelands, estuary wetlands and salt marsh habitat that benefit salmon, migratory waterfowl and birds of prey.
    Viewing Opportunities

    Birds

  • Birds of Prey
  • Eagles
  • Marine Birds
  • Shorebirds
  • Songbirds
  • Upland Birds
  • Wading Birds
  • Waterfowl
  • Mammals

  • Bear
  • Deer
  • Elk
  • Small Mammals
  • Other

  • Reptiles/Amphibians
  • Wildflowers
  • How to Get Here
    Access Site #1
    Driving Directions
    From Naselle drive west to intersection with Hwy 101. Drive north on Hwy 101 5.7 miles to small-undeveloped parking area. From South Bend drive south on Hwy 101 approximately 20 miles to small-undeveloped parking area.
    Parking/Restroom Information
    No Restrooms Unimproved parking
    Unique Features
    Unique estuary flora and fauna can be found on this site. There is a short trail through mature conifer forest that leads to the estuary. Roosevelt elk, Black-tailed deer, and many birds are common on this site.
    Other Information
    No overnight camping or parking.
    The Ocean Shores Airport unit is 185 acres located on the east side of the Ocean Shores Peninsula of Grays Harbor in Grays Harbor County. It is maintained in a natural state and managed for hunting opportunities.
    Viewing Opportunities

    Birds

  • Birds of Prey
  • Eagles
  • Shorebirds
  • Songbirds
  • Wading Birds
  • Waterfowl
  • Mammals

  • Deer
  • Small Mammals
  • Other

  • Reptiles/Amphibians
  • How to Get Here
    Access Site #1
    Driving Directions
    This area is located between the Ocean Shores airport and Grays Harbor. From Ocean Shores follow signs to airport and park in visitor parking area. Sign with instructions and rules for traveling to wildlife area is in parking lot.
    Parking/Restroom Information
    Improved parking Restrooms.
    Unique Features
    This area is a popular waterfowl hunting spot. It is also offers excellent year round birding opportunities. Spring and fall migrations are best described as spectacular.
    Other Information
    No over night camping or parking. Site is accessed through the Ocean Shores airport. Read and follow instructions posted in parking area.
    The Ocean Park unit is two acres of coastal wetland habitat that is maintained as waterfowl forage and migration habitat. This parcel is located in Pacific County and is adjacent to lands protected for Oregon silverspot butterfly recovery.
    Viewing Opportunities

    Birds

  • Songbirds
  • Wading Birds
  • Waterfowl
  • Other

  • Butterflies
  • How to Get Here
    Access Site #1
    Driving Directions
    Located on the long beach peninsula.
    Parking/Restroom Information
    No established parking No restrooms
    Unique Features
    Oregon Siverspot butterfly restoration site.
    The Oregon Silverspot Butterfly Recovery unit is 50 acres located two miles south of Klipsan Beach. It is adjacent to the west side of Loomis Lake in Pacific County. The property provides some of the last remaining salt-spray meadows with preferred forbs (violets) for the butterflies.
    Viewing Opportunities

    Birds

  • Birds of Prey
  • Eagles
  • Songbirds
  • Upland Birds
  • Wading Birds
  • Waterfowl
  • Mammals

  • Deer
  • Small Mammals
  • Other

  • Butterflies
  • Reptiles/Amphibians
  • Wildflowers
  • How to Get Here
    Access Site #1
    Driving Directions
    North from downtown Long Beach beginning at Bolstad Street 6.2 mi on Hwy 103, Right at Public Fishing sign, access at end of road
    Parking/Restroom Information
    Improved parking Restrooms
    Unique Features
    Site is intended for future Oregon Silver Spot Butterfly restoration. This Butterfly is considered endangered by the state of Washington and is listed as threatened by the federal government.
    Other Information
    No overnight camping or parking. Access to this area is primarily for fishing.
    The 683-acre Oyhut unit is located at the south end of the Ocean Shores Peninsula in Grays Harbor County. The property is maintained as waterfowl habitat and for associated recreational opportunities. It is one of four remaining snowy plover nesting sites in the state.
    Viewing Opportunities

    Birds

  • Birds of Prey
  • Eagles
  • Marine Birds
  • Shorebirds
  • Songbirds
  • Wading Birds
  • Waterfowl
  • Mammals

  • Deer
  • Small Mammals
  • Other

  • Reptiles/Amphibians
  • How to Get Here
    Access Site #1
    Driving Directions
    From downtown Ocean Shores take Point Brown avenue south to Toquin Avenue. Turn right to unimproved parking area.
    Parking/Restroom Information
    Undeveloped parking area No restrooms
    Other Information
    Nesting area for Western Snowy Plover. Please respect “closed to Public access” signs to protect nests
    Unique Features
    Popular waterfowl hunting and birding area. Nesting area for Western Snowy Plover. Please respect “closed to Public access” signs to protect nests.
    Other Information
    No overnight parking or camping.
    The Palix unit is 240 acres located five miles southwest of South Bend in Pacific County. The property is maintained for estuarine function and values, waterfowl hunting and fishing access.
    Viewing Opportunities

    Birds

  • Birds of Prey
  • Eagles
  • Marine Birds
  • Shorebirds
  • Songbirds
  • Wading Birds
  • Waterfowl
  • Mammals

  • Bear
  • Deer
  • Elk
  • Small Mammals
  • Other

  • Reptiles/Amphibians
  • Wildflowers
  • How to Get Here
    Access Site #1
    Driving Directions
    This area has no developed access point or facilities. It is best accessed by boat from the Palix River water access site. Directions to Palix River water access site. South from South Bend approx 15 mi on Hwy 101, after crossing the Palix River Bridge turn left into parking area
    Unique Features
    This area is mostly within the tide zone of the estuary. Often flooded at high tide it has a rich diversity of plant and animal life. Roosevelt elk, deer, and numerous birds and small mammals can be seen here. This area is popular for waterfowl hunting and elk hunting.
    Other Information
    No overnight camping or parking.
    The 646-acre Smith Creek-North River unit is located 10 miles northwest of Raymond in Pacific County. It is maintained for tidelands and recreation.
    Viewing Opportunities

    Birds

  • Birds of Prey
  • Eagles
  • Shorebirds
  • Songbirds
  • Wading Birds
  • Waterfowl
  • Mammals

  • Deer
  • Elk
  • Small Mammals
  • Other

  • Reptiles/Amphibians
  • Wildflowers
  • How to Get Here
    Access Site #1
    Driving Directions
    This site has no developed trails. There is a water access site associated with this property. Directions to water access site: From Raymond drive north 10.4 mi on Hwy 105. Turn right at “Public Fishing” sign just across the Smith River Bridge From Tokeland, Drive south approximately 8.5 miles on Hwy 105. Turn left just before the Smith Creek Bridge.
    Unique Features
    Located at the mouth of Smith Creek it is a popular site for Sea Kayaking, Waterfowl hunting, bird watching, and fishing.
    Other Information
    No overnight camping or parking.
    The South Grays Harbor unit is 63 acres, with an additional 800 acres pending, and is located southwest of Aberdeen in Grays Harbor County. This unit is managed for critical shoreline and estuary preservation.
    Viewing Opportunities

    Birds

  • Birds of Prey
  • Eagles
  • Shorebirds
  • Songbirds
  • Upland Birds
  • Wading Birds
  • Waterfowl
  • Mammals

  • Small Mammals
  • Other

  • Reptiles/Amphibians
  • How to Get Here
    Access Site #1
    Driving Directions
    This area is located off Hwy 105 between Aberdeen and Westport. No maintained parking, facilities, or trails.
    Parking/Restroom Information
    No established parking area. No restrooms.
    Unique Features
    This area consists of three parcels of land totaling approximately 129 acres along the south shore of Grays Harbor. This area is popular with waterfowl hunters and birders.
    Other Information
    No overnight camping or parking.
    The 740-acre Willapa Estuary unit is five miles west of Raymond and adjacent to the Willapa River in Pacific County. The unit is managed for waterfowl hunting and shellfish harvest.
    Viewing Opportunities

    Birds

  • Birds of Prey
  • Eagles
  • Shorebirds
  • Songbirds
  • Wading Birds
  • Waterfowl
  • Mammals

  • Deer
  • Elk
  • Small Mammals
  • Other

  • Reptiles/Amphibians
  • How to Get Here
    Access Site #1
    Driving Directions
    This area is located off Hwy 105 on the north side of Willapa harbor. No parking, facilities, or maintained trails at this site.
    Parking/Restroom Information
    No established parking area. No restrooms.
    Unique Features
    This site is often used buy waterfowl hunters. Excellent birding opportunities at this site for the adventurous.
    Other Information
    No overnight camping or parking.
    The Willapa Wetlands Unit is 580 acres and is located two miles west of South Bend. It is adjacent to the Willapa River in Pacific County. The unit is managed for restored estuary function.
    Viewing Opportunities

    Birds

  • Birds of Prey
  • Eagles
  • Shorebirds
  • Songbirds
  • Wading Birds
  • Waterfowl
  • Mammals

  • Deer
  • Elk
  • Small Mammals
  • Other

  • Reptiles/Amphibians
  • How to Get Here
    Access Site #1
    Driving Directions
    From South Bend drive Hwy 101 south 1.2 miles to parking area located on right side of Hwy.
    Parking/Restroom Information
    Developed parking area. No Restrooms.
    Unique Features
    This area has an estuary and wetlands restoration project in progress. Site is popular with water fowlers and birders. In early morning and late evening this is an excellent location for Roosevelt elk viewing.
    Other Information
    No overnight camping or parking.
    The Big Buck unit is 5,150 acres to the north and west of the confluence of the Twisp and Methow rivers, the southeast corner about a mile northwest of Twisp. The area is bordered on the west by USFS and DNR land, and on the north, east and south by private land. Although some mule deer winter here, it is primarily used as spring and fall range for deer migrating to and from summer ranges in the Twisp River drainage and the Sawtooth Wilderness. Habitats and vegetation vary from heavily timbered areas (Ponderosa pine and Douglas fir) on the north facing aspects, to open shrub steppe (bitterbrush, sagebrush, and bunch grasses) on the south and east facing slopes. Riparian vegetation dominates around lakes, ponds and streams. Key habitat for biodiversity includes Deadhorse, Shaw and Aspen lakes and Peters Puddles.
    Viewing Opportunities

    Birds

  • Birds of Prey
  • Eagles
  • Songbirds
  • Upland Birds
  • Wading Birds
  • Waterfowl
  • Mammals

  • Bear
  • Deer
  • Small Mammals
  • Other

  • Butterflies
  • Reptiles/Amphibians
  • Wildflowers
  • How to Get Here
    Access Site #1
    Driving Directions
    Twisp River Road, right on Frost Rd. enter the Wildlife Area 1 mile up road.
    Parking/Restroom Information
    Parking at and before Shaw Lake. no restrooms.

    See listing of Methow Access Sites and Facility Information

    Access Site #2
    Driving Directions
    Twisp River Road, right on Elbow Coulee Road. Walk in access from Elbow Coulee Road for approximately the next 3 miles.
    Parking/Restroom Information
    No specific parking area. No restrooms.

    See listing of Methow Access Sites and Facility Information

    Other Information
    See photos of Aspen Lake, Scott Canyon, Deadhorse Lake.
    The Big Valley unit is 1,164 acres about five miles northwest of Winthrop between Highway 20 and the Methow River. The area is mostly flat with little elevation change. It was purchased primarily for endangered fisheries riparian habitat protection along the Methow River, but is also in the migratory path of deer moving north and south between winter ranges in the lower valley and summer ranges in the upper Methow Valley and Pasayten Wilderness. The riparian vegetation shades and cools the river for endangered salmon and steelhead, but it’s also beneficial for neo-tropical birds, mule and white-tailed deer, bears, cougars, bobcats, coyotes, mink, otter, and beaver. Several side channels in the riverine floodplain provide winter habitat for fish and important water storage for recharge of the Methow River. Farm fields along highway 20 are planted with alfalfa, cereal grains and native vegetation to increase food and cover for a number of species.
    Viewing Opportunities

    Birds

  • Birds of Prey
  • Eagles
  • Songbirds
  • Upland Birds
  • Waterfowl
  • Mammals

  • Bear
  • Deer
  • Elk
  • Moose
  • Small Mammals
  • Other

  • Butterflies
  • Reptiles/Amphibians
  • Spawning Salmon
  • Wildflowers
  • How to Get Here
    Access Site #1
    Driving Directions
    Highway 20 north of Winthrop. Left on Dripping Springs Road. Follow to the left and park at trailhead.
    Parking/Restroom Information
    Parking and ADA accessible toilet at trailhead.

    See listing of Methow Access Sites and Facility Information

    Other Information
    This unit is open year-round.
    Unique Features
    Methow Community Trail maintained by Methow Valley Sport Trails Association for winter skiing/snowshoeing, and summer horse/bike/hike. Interpretive signs around 6 mile loop trail.
    Other Information
    Key spawning grounds for spring Chinook salmon along the Methow river.
    The Golden Doe unit is 1,514 acres about 3 ½ miles south of Twisp off the west side county road. It is bordered on the west by USFS lands and on all other sides by private lands. Elevation ranges from 1,480 feet on the Methow River bottom to 3,000 feet in the southwest corner. It was acquired for mule deer winter range and the biodiversity of its large riparian areas on the Methow River. Its primarily east and south facing slopes are dominated by bitterbrush and bunchgrasses along the east face of McClure Mountain. Alder Creek bisects the unit from northwest to southeast. A large riparian area on the east side of the Methow River, known as Prewitt Island, is home to a wide variety of wildlife.
    Viewing Opportunities

    Birds

  • Birds of Prey
  • Eagles
  • Songbirds
  • Upland Birds
  • Waterfowl
  • Mammals

  • Bear
  • Deer
  • Small Mammals
  • Other

  • Butterflies
  • Reptiles/Amphibians
  • Wildflowers
  • How to Get Here
    Access Site #1
    Driving Directions
    Follow Old Twisp-Carlton Hwy south of Twisp approximately 5 miles. Small road on right crosses over Alder Creek.
    Parking/Restroom Information
    Parking at end of road 1/8 mile off Old Twisp-Carlton Hwy. No motor vehicle access onto Golden Doe Unit.

    See listing of Methow Access Sites and Facility Information

    Other Information
    No parking access during winter months
    This 2,744-acre unit is located in Cowlitz County along the North Fork Toutle River adjacent to the Mount St. Helens National Volcanic Monument. The unit was established in 1990 to protect elk winter range on the North Fork Toutle River mudflow that resulted from the 1980 eruption of Mount St. Helens. Most of the property was acquired through a land exchange with the Weyerhaeuser Co., with assistance from the Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation. Extensive efforts have been made to improve elk winter forage, including constructing erosion control structures, weed control, and vegetation plantings. This unit is part of the Mudflow elk area, which allows elk hunting by special permit only. All other hunting is restricted on the area.
    Viewing Opportunities

    Birds

  • Birds of Prey
  • Eagles
  • Songbirds
  • Upland Birds
  • Waterfowl
  • Mammals

  • Deer
  • Elk
  • How to Get Here
    Access Site #1
    Driving Directions
    From Interstate 5 at Castle Rock turn east on Highway 504. The area is approximatly 30 miles east of Castle Rock south of the highway along the North Fork of the Toutle River. The unit is approximatly 1.5 miles south of the highway on the valley floor.
    Parking/Restroom Information
    There is parking located along the pull outs of Highway 504, but there are no public driving routes down onto the Wildlife Area from the Highway. There are no restroom facilities.
    Other Information
    The unit is open to the public May 1st to November 30th.
    Unique Features
    The unit is a wintering area for elk along the North Fork of the Toutle River, and is the debris flow from the Mt. St. Helens eruption.
    Other Information
    The wildlife area is within a game management unit closed to all hunting and trapping except elk hunting by special permit. The wildlife area is closed to public access from December 1st through April 30th each year to protect wintering elk herds. Dogs are not allowed on the wildlife area at any time.
    The Cedar Creek unit is 127 acres and provides band-tailed pigeon habitat. It is located northeast of La Center. Mineral springs are maintained and protected. Stream restoration is also important.
    Viewing Opportunities

    Birds

  • Birds of Prey
  • Songbirds
  • Upland Birds
  • Mammals

  • Deer
  • Other

  • Spawning Salmon
  • How to Get Here
    Access Site #1
    Driving Directions
    From the west: Interstate 5 exit 21 (Woodland Cougar exit) Turn east onto Highway 503, then south on NW Hayes Rd, which will cross the North Fork of the Lewis River. Continue east on NW Hayes Rd. which becomes Cedar Creek Rd. About 12 miles from Woodland the Wildlife area will be on the east side of the road just before Cedar Creek Road crosses Cedar Creek and joins with Pup Creek RD.
    Parking/Restroom Information
    There is a small pull out by the gate to the wildlife area. There are no restrooms
    Access Site #2
    Driving Directions
    From the south: Take 503 north from the Vancouver area through Farger Lake. Turn north onto 166th, which becomes 167th. Turn west onto NE 379th which becomes NE 164th, which becomes NE Reid Rd. which becomes NE Munch Rd. At the intersection of NE Munch Rd and Cedar Creek Rd. turn east onto Cedar Creek Rd. Go about .5 miles and the wildlife area will be on the east side of the road just before Cedar Creek Road crosses Cedar Creek.
    Parking/Restroom Information
    There is a small pull out by the gate to the wildlife area. There are no restrooms
    Unique Features
    Mineral spring attracts band-tailed pigeons.
    Other Information
    Vehicles and ATVs are prohibited on wildlife area.
    The 89-acre Bell Creek unit is located on the east side of Sequim. The unit is managed for conservation, restoration and enhancement of Garry oak forest and associated prairie habitat as well as stream and riparian restoration. Habitat types include deciduous dominant riparian forest, marsh wetland, forested wetland, wet upland meadows and oak-woodland prairie. The prairie habitat supports many butterfly species.
    Viewing Opportunities

    Birds

  • Birds of Prey
  • Eagles
  • Songbirds
  • Upland Birds
  • Wading Birds
  • Waterfowl
  • Mammals

  • Deer
  • Elk
  • Small Mammals
  • Other

  • Butterflies
  • Reptiles/Amphibians
  • Wildflowers
  • How to Get Here
    Access Site #1
    Driving Directions
    No developed parking, facilities or trails. Please use online mapping to locate this area.
    Parking/Restroom Information
    No developed parking No restrooms
    Unique Features
    This area is made up of several parcels. Currently there is wetland, riparian, and oak woodland/ savanna restoration in progress.
    Other Information
    No camping or overnight parking.
    The 109-acre Chimacum unit is 2.5 miles north of Chimacum and 6 miles south of Port Townsend. It is managed for stream, riparian, and estuarine restoration and protection at Irondale on Chimacum Creek. Habitat types include conifer and deciduous riparian forest, and estuary.
    Viewing Opportunities

    Birds

  • Birds of Prey
  • Eagles
  • Marine Birds
  • Shorebirds
  • Songbirds
  • Wading Birds
  • Waterfowl
  • Mammals

  • Deer
  • Small Mammals
  • Other

  • Reptiles/Amphibians
  • How to Get Here
    Access Site #1
    Driving Directions
    From the Jefferson county airport, drive south on Hwy 19 to intersection with Irondale road. Turn east on Irondale road and drive to 4th street. Turn north on 4th street to Moore Street. Turn east on Moore Street to parking area.
    Parking/Restroom Information
    County maintains parking and restrooms.
    Unique Features
    This site has beach and estuary access. Maintained trails on site that connect to county park trails.
    Other Information
    No overnight camping or parking.
    Reardan Audubon Lake Wildlife Area is 277 acres of wetlands, seasonal ponds, grasslands, channeled scablands and an 80-acre lake, located on the north side of the town of Reardan in northeast Lincoln County.

    Reardan Audubon Lake supports over 200 bird and other wildlife species, 12 of special concern in Washington. Birds love this shallow basin for its food-rich alkaline mudflats, especially spring and fall migrating waterfowl and shorebirds. So many birdwatchers have been coming to this site since the 1950's that it became known as "Audubon Lake."

    Reardan Audubon Lake was acquired in 2006 with a state grant for critical wildlife habitat after Spokane Audubon Society and Inland Northwest Land Trust secured a purchase agreement from former landowner Susan Eastman.

    Reardan Audubon Lake is part of the Ice Age Floods National Geologic Trail and the Great Washington State Birding Trail.

    Viewing Opportunities

    Birds

  • Birds of Prey
  • Eagles
  • Shorebirds
  • Songbirds
  • Upland Birds
  • Wading Birds
  • Waterfowl
  • Mammals

  • Deer
  • Small Mammals
  • Other

  • Butterflies
  • Reptiles/Amphibians
  • Wildflowers
  • How to Get Here
    Access Site #1
    Driving Directions
    From US Hwy 2 at Reardan, turn north on State Hwy 231, about two blocks to Railroad Ave., turn east and continue about two blocks to Audubon Way, turn north to southside parking lot.
    Parking/Restroom Information
    Parking lot has vault toilet, visitor information kiosk, and short (less than one-quarter mile) ADA-accessible gravel trail to viewing blind with telescopes.
    Other Information
    No overnight parking or camping. Pack it in, pack it out. No fishing (no fish in lake), no hunting or firearms, no fires or fireworks. Keep dogs and other pets on leash or leave in vehicle or at home. Discover Pass (or Vehicle Access Pass that comes with fishing or hunting license) required.
    Access Site #2
    Driving Directions
    From US Hwy 2 at Reardan, turn north on State Hwy 231, continue about one mile to Euclid Ave., turn east and continue about half-mile to northside parking lot.
    Parking/Restroom Information
    Parking lot has vault toilet, visitor information kiosk, and short (about one-quarter mile) ADA-accessible gravel trail to viewing blind with telescopes.
    Other Information
    No overnight parking or camping. Pack it in, pack it out. No fishing (no fish in lake), no hunting or firearms, no fires or fireworks. Keep dogs and other pets on leash or leave in vehicle or at home. Discover Pass (or Vehicle Access Pass that comes with fishing or hunting license) required.
    Unique Features
    Additional grants and donations from cooperating partners, including Spokane Audubon Society, Inland Northwest Land Trust, Lincoln County Conservation District, Reardan Lions Club, and Friends of Audubon Lake, have supported restoration of grasslands to original Palouse Prairie and facility development, including north and south-side parking lots, viewing blinds with telescopes, vegetation screening along trails, and visitor information kiosks.
    WDFW no longer claims a lease to the Clallam County property. For more information see http://www.clallam.net/Parks/
    Viewing Opportunities

    Birds

  • Birds of Prey
  • Eagles
  • Marine Birds
  • Shorebirds
  • Songbirds
  • Upland Birds
  • Wading Birds
  • Waterfowl
  • Mammals

  • Deer
  • Small Mammals
  • Other

  • Reptiles/Amphibians
  • How to Get Here
    Access Site #1
    Driving Directions
    This site is owned and managed by the Clallam county parks department. Please go to the web page for driving directions and available facilities. http://www.clallam.net/CountyParks/html/parks_dungeness.htm
    The Elwha unit covers 62 acres located five miles west of Port Angeles and 2.5 miles north of Highway 101. Most of the unit is situated in the 100-year floodplain of the Elwha River. It was purchased for public fishing access to the Elwha River, although currently there is no public access to the unit through the surrounding properties. It is also managed for preservation of undeveloped floodplain habitat and contains conifer and deciduous riparian forest.
    Viewing Opportunities

    Birds

  • Birds of Prey
  • Eagles
  • Songbirds
  • Upland Birds
  • Mammals

  • Bear
  • Deer
  • Elk
  • Small Mammals
  • Other

  • Reptiles/Amphibians
  • Spawning Salmon
  • How to Get Here
    Access Site #1
    Driving Directions
    This area is located on the Elwha River. It has no developed access or established parking area. Use the online mapping feature on the WDFW to locate.
    Unique Features
    Riparian habitat
    Other Information
    No overnight parking or camping.
    The Lower Dungeness unit, located 3.5 miles north of Sequim, is comprised of 148 acres owned by WDFW and 73 acres of Conservation Easement on PCCF Trust ownership. The property was purchased to protect and restore the natural lower floodplain riverine system and forested wetland. Habitat types include deciduous dominant riparian forest, scrub-shrub wetland, marsh wetland, wet upland meadows and estuary.

    Hunting Opportunities


    Viewing Opportunities

    Birds

  • Birds of Prey
  • Eagles
  • Marine Birds
  • Shorebirds
  • Songbirds
  • Waterfowl
  • Mammals

  • Small Mammals
  • Other

  • Spawning Salmon
  • How to Get Here
    Access Site #1
    Driving Directions
    A parking area is located at the 3 Crabs site at the intersection of Sequim-Dungeness Way and 3 Crabs Road. The address of this location is 11 3 Crabs Road.
    Parking/Restroom Information
    A toilet is located at the 3 Crabs parking area.
    Access Site #2
    Driving Directions
    A parking area is located at the River's End site on the north side of East Anderson Road just west of the Dungeness River.
    Parking/Restroom Information
    A toilet is seasonally available at the River's End parking area.
    Unique Features
    Shoreline, scenic vistas, Dungeness River.
    Other Information
    Waterfowl hunting is offered at the River's End site.
    The 133-acre Morse Creek Unit is located three miles east of Port Angeles. It was purchased to protect important wildlife habitat in a rapidly urbanizing area and for restoration of the riverine system, including salmon habitat. Habitat types include deciduous dominant riparian forest, marsh wetland, forested wetland, and mixed shrub.
    Viewing Opportunities

    Birds

  • Birds of Prey
  • Eagles
  • Songbirds
  • Upland Birds
  • Mammals

  • Deer
  • Small Mammals
  • Other

  • Reptiles/Amphibians
  • Spawning Salmon
  • How to Get Here
    Access Site #1
    Driving Directions
    There is no established parking area or facilities.
    Unique Features
    Morse Creek and ongoing riparian restoration.
    Other Information
    This Unit is adjacent to the Olympic Discovery trail.
    The Snow Creek-Salmon Creek unit is 156 acres located at the confluence of Snow and Salmon creeks at Discovery Bay. It was acquired for stream, riparian, and estuarine restoration and protection. Habitat types include scrub-shrub wetland, marsh wetland, forested wetland, wet upland meadows, upland and estuary.
    Viewing Opportunities

    Birds

  • Birds of Prey
  • Eagles
  • Shorebirds
  • Songbirds
  • Upland Birds
  • Wading Birds
  • Waterfowl
  • Mammals

  • Deer
  • Elk
  • Small Mammals
  • Other

  • Butterflies
  • Reptiles/Amphibians
  • Spawning Salmon
  • Wildflowers
  • How to Get Here
    Access Site #1
    Driving Directions
    From intersection of Hwy 101 and S.R. 20 drive west on Hwy 101 approximately .3 miles to west Uncas road. Turn left on west Uncas road. Drive approximately .3 miles to unimproved parking area. Area is accessible by foot, no maintained trails.
    Parking/Restroom Information
    No improved parking. No restroom.
    Unique Features
    This area has an extensive estuary and riparian restoration in progress. Good opportunity to observe summer chum salmon spawning. Good bird watching opportunities.
    Other Information
    No overnight parking or camping.
    South Sequim Bay is located 7.5 miles southeast of Sequim at Jimmy Come Lately (JCL) Creek and covers 22 acres. The property was purchased to restore the natural lower estuary and floodplain, and eliminate sedimentation. Habitat types include deciduous dominant riparian forest and estuary.
    Viewing Opportunities

    Birds

  • Birds of Prey
  • Eagles
  • Marine Birds
  • Shorebirds
  • Songbirds
  • Upland Birds
  • Wading Birds
  • Waterfowl
  • Mammals

  • Deer
  • Small Mammals
  • How to Get Here
    Access Site #1
    Driving Directions
    There is no established parking area or facility. Area is located at the near the mouth of “Jimmy Come Lately Creek”. Use online mapping feature available on the WDFW web site to locate.
    Unique Features
    Wetlands and estuary.
    Other Information
    No overnight camping or parking.
    The Tarboo unit lies 4.5 miles northeast of Quilcene at the top of Tarboo Bay. It was acquired to protect high quality stream and riparian habitat for salmon and wildlife and to protect the Tarboo-Dabob Bay’s water quality. It includes both conifer and deciduous forests and supports protected species such as bald eagle, northern spotted owl and marbled murrelet.
    Viewing Opportunities

    Birds

  • Birds of Prey
  • Eagles
  • Marine Birds
  • Shorebirds
  • Songbirds
  • Upland Birds
  • Wading Birds
  • Waterfowl
  • Mammals

  • Bear
  • Deer
  • Small Mammals
  • Other

  • Reptiles/Amphibians
  • How to Get Here
    Access Site #1
    Driving Directions
    This area is located at the mouth of Tarboo creek. There is no established parking area or facilities. Use the online mapping feature available on the WDFW web site to locate.
    Unique Features
    For the adventurer this location offers access to mature forest, riparian habitat, and Tarboo bay. Birding should be excellent here on incoming tides.
    Other Information
    No overnight camping or parking.
    The Chief Joseph unit is located in the southeast corner of Washington State between the Snake and Grande Ronde Rivers, straddling Joseph Creek. It was acquired in 1974 to enhance bighorn sheep, mule deer, and upland game bird populations. The rugged grassland canyons now support populations of deer, elk, bighorn sheep, upland birds, and raptors. It also includes quality riparian habitat that support a diversity of neo-tropical migrant birds, reptiles and amphibians. The Joseph Creek watershed is home to both steelhead and bull trout, both federally listed as threatened and managed as state species of concern. The area is popular with native wildflower viewing in the spring, wildlife watching in the summer and winter months, and hunting during the fall.
    Viewing Opportunities

    Birds

  • Birds of Prey
  • Eagles
  • Songbirds
  • Upland Birds
  • Mammals

  • Bear
  • Bighorn sheep
  • Deer
  • Elk
  • Small Mammals
  • Other

  • Butterflies
  • Reptiles/Amphibians
  • Wildflowers
  • How to Get Here
    Access Site #1
    Driving Directions
    From Asotin, drive up Snake River Road along the Snake River to Heller Bar, which is located at the mouth of the Grande Ronde River. Continue along the county road, which now follows the Grande Ronde. The entrance to the wildlife area is approximately 2 miles past Heller Bar. Continue past the boundary sign on the county road. The road will eventually leave the Grande Ronde and follow Joseph Creek. Continue up Joseph Creek to marked WDFW property along both sides of the road. There is private property in blocks along the road, which are clearly identified.
    Parking/Restroom Information
    There are several access sites along the Grande Ronde and Joseph Creek. Restrooms are available.
    Other Information
    The Chief Joseph Wildlife Area is open year-round. Motorized vehicles 48" and under in size are permitted to travel up Green Gulch Road during the months of October and November only.
    Unique Features
    This wildlife area is characterized by steep canyons and brushy riparian bottoms. Elk, turkeys, quail, bighorn sheep, and deer are commonly seen along Joseph Creek.
    The 963-acre Olympic unit is located 15 miles north of Aberdeen in Grays Harbor County and consists of several parcels within the Wishkah River Valley. This unit is managed for elk winter forage habitat and to reduce elk damage to private property. Habitat types include riparian, wetland and old growth forest. Mowing, reseeding and fertilizing are conducted to improve elk forage.
    Viewing Opportunities

    Birds

  • Birds of Prey
  • Songbirds
  • Upland Birds
  • Mammals

  • Bear
  • Deer
  • Elk
  • Small Mammals
  • Other

  • Reptiles/Amphibians
  • Wildflowers
  • How to Get Here
    Access Site #1
    Driving Directions
    Driving Directions/ Parking and Restrooms/ Seasonal Restrictions: Main two sites This area consists of numerous land parcels scattered through out the Wishkah and Wynoochee River drainages. There are currently no maintained parking areas and no Restrooms. To access these areas please use the online mapping feature on the WDFW website.
    Parking/Restroom Information
    No Restrooms
    Unique Features
    The Wildlife Area consists of forests and small fields, which are scattered among small, private tree farms, DNR land, and corporate timberlands. Various streams wind their way through lush rain forests. Vegetation includes Douglas fir, alder, and big-leaf maple as the primary tree species. Lower canopy and groundcover species including trailing blackberry, salmonberry, fireweed, vine maple, cascara, salal, and other valuable, herbaceous forage plants. Although the purchase of the area was intended for management of elk, management has also increased upland bird use and provides habitat for various other species of wildlife. Bald eagles frequent the area and ruffed and blue grouse are common. Salmon and other fish species occupy the rivers. These areas are popular during hunting season and used throughout the year for hiking, biking, and wildlife viewing.
    Other Information
    No overnight parking or camping
    The Anderson Homestead unit is 41 acres located five miles south of Forks in Clallam County. The unit is managed as elk winter forage habitat and riparian habitat. Reseeding and fertilizing are conducted to improve elk forage.
    Viewing Opportunities

    Birds

  • Birds of Prey
  • Eagles
  • Songbirds
  • Upland Birds
  • Mammals

  • Bear
  • Deer
  • Elk
  • Small Mammals
  • Other

  • Butterflies
  • Reptiles/Amphibians
  • Wildflowers
  • How to Get Here
    Access Site #1
    Driving Directions
    From Forks, drive south on Hwy 101 approximately 4 miles to Furman road. Turn right on Furman road .3 miles (end of road) to gate.
    Parking/Restroom Information
    Unimproved parking No Restrooms
    Unique Features
    This site has managed elk meadows, riparian habitat and access by foot to Bogachiel River. Roosevelt elk and Black-tailed deer use the meadows year round. Best times to see are early morning and late evening. Eagles, Osprey, and Dippers are common along the river. Numerous songbirds use the diverse habitat provided at this area.
    Other Information
    No overnight camping or parking.
    The Wynoochee Mitigation unit is 1,030 acres located 25 miles north of Montesano in Grays Harbor County. The unit lies along the Wynoochee River. It is owned by Tacoma Power and has been managed by WDFW since 1992 as mitigation for the loss of habitat from the Wynoochee dam and reservoir. This unit is managed as elk winter forage habitat.
    Viewing Opportunities

    Birds

  • Birds of Prey
  • Eagles
  • Songbirds
  • Upland Birds
  • Wading Birds
  • Waterfowl
  • Mammals

  • Bear
  • Deer
  • Elk
  • Small Mammals
  • Other

  • Butterflies
  • Reptiles/Amphibians
  • Wildflowers
  • How to Get Here
    Access Site #1
    Driving Directions
    This area consists of numerous land parcels scattered through out the Wynoochee River drainages. To access these areas please you the online mapping feature on the WDFW website.
    Parking/Restroom Information
    No Restrooms. No improved parking.
    Unique Features
    The Wildlife Area consists of forests and small fields, which are scattered among small, private tree farms, DNR land, and corporate timberlands. Various streams wind their way through forests. Vegetation includes Douglas fir and big-leaf maple as the primary tree species. Lower canopy and groundcover species including trailing blackberry, salmonberry, fireweed, vine maple, cascara, salal, and other valuable, herbaceous forage plants. Although the purchase of the area was intended for management of elk, management has also increased upland bird use and provides habitat for various other species of wildlife. Bald eagles frequent the area and ruffed and blue grouse are common. Salmon and other fish species occupy the rivers. These areas are popular during hunting season and used though out the year for hiking, biking, and wildlife viewing.
    Other Information
    No overnight camping or parking

    Viewing Opportunities

    Birds

  • Birds of Prey
  • Songbirds
  • Upland Birds
  • Wading Birds
  • Waterfowl
  • Mammals

  • Deer
  • Small Mammals
  • Other

  • Butterflies
  • Reptiles/Amphibians
  • Wildflowers
  • How to Get Here
    Access Site #1
    Driving Directions
    From Spokane, drive west on I-90 to the town of Sprague. Turn South onto Hwy 23, drive approx 12 miles. Turn right onto Davis Road. Drive approx. 6 miles, keeping to the right.
    Parking/Restroom Information
    Two designated parking areas, no toilets. A Discover Pass or WDFW Vehicle Access Pass is required.
    Other Information
    Daytime parking only.
    Unique Features
    This is mostly shrub steppe habitat, in the Channeled Scablands. Rock Creek runs through the area. Trout run in the creek. Good area for viewing spring wildflowers and shrub steppe obligate songbirds. Shrub/tree plots exist along portions of the creek.
    Other Information
    There is some contract irrigated agriculture on the property, on the flats along the creek. Be very careful to watch for rattlesnakes, spring to fall. Area is popular for hunting, mostly mule deer, upland bird, coyote. Some people fish the creek.
    The 6,452-acre Bridgeport unit is located immediately south of the town of Bridgeport. This unit has the most diverse array of habitats found on the Sagebrush Flat Area. Although shrubsteppe is the most dominant habitat, here one can also find permanent lakes, seasonal ponds and wetlands, meadow steppe, grasslands, aspen groves, while basalt cliffs and stands of Ponderosa pine overlook the Columbia River and the town of Bridgeport. Year-round and seasonal streams include Middle Foster Creek and West Foster Creek. Beavers have created a series of ponds in West Foster Creek and Fye Draw and there are numerous natural springs. Along with this diversity of habitats is a diversity of wildlife. Many shrubsteppe dependent species use the area including sharp-tailed grouse, sage grouse, sage thrasher, Brewer’s sparrow, vesper sparrow, loggerhead shrike, short-eared owl, prairie falcon and white-tailed jackrabbit. Neotropcial songbirds use the riparian areas, aspen groves, and Ponderosa pine stands. Mule deer can be found through the area. Upland game birds include blue grouse, Hungarian partridge, California quail and limited numbers of pheasant and Chukar. Upland bird hunters are advised that sharp-tailed grouse and sage grouse are protected species and can be found anywhere on the unit. If you intend to hunt upland birds you should be proficient at identifying both sharp-tailed grouse and sage grouse.

    Elevation ranges from 2,833 feet in west to 1,000 feet near the town of Bridgeport. Current management is focused on restoration of old agricultural fields to native vegetation, expanding and improving riparian areas and weed control.

    Viewing Opportunities

    Birds

  • Birds of Prey
  • Eagles
  • Shorebirds
  • Songbirds
  • Upland Birds
  • Wading Birds
  • Waterfowl
  • Mammals

  • Bear
  • Deer
  • Small Mammals
  • Other

  • Butterflies
  • Reptiles/Amphibians
  • Wildflowers
  • How to Get Here
    Access Site #1
    Driving Directions
    From north: Travel State Highway 17 to it's intersection with Douglas County Road Bridgeport Hill Road. Turn south on to Bridgeport Hill Rd. and travel 2.1 miles. Parking area is on east side of road. From south: Travel US Highway 2 to it's insection with State Highway 172. Turn north on to Hwy 172 and travel 19 miles to it's insection with Douglas County Bridgeport Hill Road, also known as B NE. Turn north on to Bridgeport Hill and travel 9.25 miles. Parking area is on east side of road.
    Parking/Restroom Information
    Parking area large enough for 3 RV's. No restroom facilities.
    Other Information
    Parking area is not cleared during winter months. 20 acres adjacent to county road is closed to entry from November 15 to April 1, look for signs.
    Access Site #2
    Driving Directions
    From Bridgeport: Travel through Bridgeport via State Highway 173 to its intersection with 16th street. Turn south onto 16th street and travel approximately 0.50 miles. Follow dirt road toward municipal water tank, approximately 0.10 miles. Turn left at water tank; parking area is located just beyond water tank.
    Parking/Restroom Information
    No overnight parking or restroom facilities. Fires are NOT permitted at any time during the year.
    Unique Features
    The basalt cliffs above Bridgeport offer fabulous views of the Columbia and Okanogan Rivers. Interior service roads can be used for hiking, mountain biking snowshoeing and cross-country skiing.
    At 2,206 acres the Chester Butte unit is located in the middle of Douglas County 7 miles southeast of Mansfield and 13 miles northwest of Coulee City. Elevation ranges from 2,394 feet to 2,070 feet. Shrubsteppe dependent wildlife such as sage thrashers, Brewer’s sparrows, sage sparrows, white-tailed jackrabbits and Washington ground squirrels use the area throughout the year. Greater sage grouse are often seen on the area. In years of high precipitation, there are seasonal ponds and wet meadows that provide habitat for migrating waterfowl. Long-term management objectives are to restore old agricultural fields to native vegetation.
    Viewing Opportunities

    Birds

  • Birds of Prey
  • Eagles
  • Songbirds
  • Upland Birds
  • Waterfowl
  • Mammals

  • Deer
  • Small Mammals
  • Other

  • Butterflies
  • Reptiles/Amphibians
  • Wildflowers
  • How to Get Here
    Access Site #1
    Driving Directions
    From North: Travel State Highway 17 to it's intersection with State Road 172 in Douglas County. Turn west on to State Road 172. Travel 6 miles to Douglas County Road L NE. Turn south on to L NE and travel 5 miles to Road 9 NE. Turn west on to Road 9 and travel 2.75 miles to parking area. From south: Travel US Highway 2 to it's insection with Douglas County Road L NE. Turn north on to Road L and travel 9 miles to Road 9 NE. Turn west on to Road 9 and travel 2.75 miles to parking area.
    Parking/Restroom Information
    Parking area is at end of Road 9 and large enough for 2 - 3 average sized RV's. There are no restroom facilities. Fires are NOT permitted at any time during the year.
    Other Information
    Douglas County Road 9 NE is an unimproved road and not suited to use by sedan or other vehicles with low ground clearance. It is not plowed during winter months - travel is not advised. When wet it can become impassable - travel at your own risk.
    Unique Features
    The Chester Butte and Dormaier units are located in an area of Douglas County that was extensively affected by glaciation 15,000 years ago. The result is a landscape that features many examples of glacial deposition including eskers, kames, drumlins, erratics (haystack rocks) and a terminal moraine. This moraine, known as the Withrow Moriane, extends across the width of Douglas County from the Columbia River east to Coulee City. So unique are these features within the Columbia Plateau that the National Park Service designated several sites within the county as National Natural Landmarks. The Chester Butte unit and the nearby Dormaier unit are part of the Withrow Moraine and Jameson Lake Drumlin Field National Natural Landmark. Chester Butte is one of the most prominent features within this area.

    For more information on the Withrow Moraine and Jameson Lake Drumlin Field see the following links:

    Other Information
    No motorized vehicles are allowed on the unit. Interior service roads offer opportunities for hiking and mountain biking. The primary hunted species is mule deer. Although Hungarian partridge do occur on the area, hunting opportunities for upland game birds is limited. Sage grouse are a protected species and can be found anywhere on the unit. Hunters are advised to be proficient at identifying these birds. Cell phone coverage is not reliable. This unit is just 2.75 miles west of the Audubon Coulee Corridor Scenic Byway Birding Trail. See the Washington Audubon web site for more information.
    The 320-acre Dormaier unit is located one-half mile west of the Chester Butte unit.. Like the Chester Butte unit, this area provides habitat for wildlife that are dependent on shrubsteppe habitat for all or part of the year. This is a good area to find sage sparrows, Brewer’s sparrows and sage thrashers. Sage grouse use the area for nesting, and throughout the winter months. Once used by the endangered pygmy rabbit, the unit’s deep soils and mature sagebrush makes it a potential release site for the reintroduction of the endangered pygmy rabbit. In 2007 100 acres of agricultural fields that had been abandoned in the 1950’s were reseeded to native vegetation. Future management of the area will focus on ensuring the success of this project and control of noxious weeds. Elevation ranges from 2,300 feet to about 2,170 feet.
    Viewing Opportunities

    Birds

  • Birds of Prey
  • Eagles
  • Upland Birds
  • Mammals

  • Deer
  • Small Mammals
  • Other

  • Butterflies
  • Reptiles/Amphibians
  • Wildflowers
  • How to Get Here
    Access Site #1
    Driving Directions
    From north: Travel State Highway 17 to State Highway 172. Turn west on to 172 and travel 6 miles to it's insection with Douglas County Road L NE. Turn south on Road L and travel 9 miles to it's intersection with Douglas County Road 5 NE. Turn west on to Road 5 and travel 4 miles to it's intersection with Road H NE. Turn south on Road and travel 0.25 miles to parking area. From south: Travel US Highway 2 to it's intersection with Douglas County Road L NE. Turn north on Road L and travel 5 miles to it's insection with Road 5. Turn west on to Road 5 and travel 4 miles to it's intersection with Road H NE. Turn south on Road and travel 0.25 miles to parking area.
    Parking/Restroom Information
    Parking area is large enough for 1-2 vehicles. There is no overnight parking or restroom facilities. Fires are NOT permitted at any time during the year.
    Other Information
    During winter months Road 5 is not plowed beyond the 3.5 mile point. Travel is not advised. Road 5 is an unimproved road and not suited to travel by sedans or other vehicles with low ground clearance. When wet it can become impassable - use at your own risk.
    Unique Features
    The Chester Butte and Dormaier units are located in an area of Douglas County that was extensively affected by glaciation 15,000 years ago. The result is a landscape that features many examples of glacial deposition including eskers, kames, drumlins, erratics (haystack rocks) and a terminal moraine. This moraine, known as the Withrow Moriane, extends across the width of Douglas County from the Columbia River east to Coulee City. So unique are these features within the Columbia Plateau that the National Park Service designated several sites within the county as National Natural Landmarks. The Chester Butte unit and the nearby Dormaier unit are part of the Withrow Moraine and Jameson Lake Drumlin Field National Natural Landmark. Chester Butte is one of the most prominent features within this area.

    For more information on the Withrow Moraine and Jameson Lake Drumlin Field see the following links:

    Other Information
    No motorized vehicles are allowed on the unit. The primary hunted species is mule deer. Sage grouse are a protected species and can be found anywhere on the unit. Hunters are advised to be proficient at identifying these birds. Cell phone coverage is not reliable.
    The 109-acre Black River parcel is located 1.5 miles north of Rochester in Thurston County. The property provides habitat for upland birds including pheasant, grouse and occasionally wild turkey, and provides fishing opportunity. Habitat for waterfowl and migratory birds is also present.
    Viewing Opportunities

    Birds

  • Birds of Prey
  • Eagles
  • Songbirds
  • Upland Birds
  • Waterfowl
  • Mammals

  • Deer
  • Small Mammals
  • Other

  • Reptiles/Amphibians
  • How to Get Here
    Access Site #1
    Driving Directions
    From Southbound on I-5 1: From I-5 Southbound, Take the WA-121 N exit, Exit 95, toward Littlerock/ Maytown, go 0.2 miles. 2. Take the ramp toward Littlerock and merge onto Maytown Rd SW, go 2.9 miles. 3. Maytown Rd SW becomes 128th Ave SW, go 0.8 miles. 4. Turn Left onto Mima Rd SW. go 3.1 miles. 5. Turn Slight right onto Gate Rd SW, go 2.2 miles. 6. End at Parking Area on left side of road. From Northbound on I-5 1: From I-5 Northbound, Take the WA-121 N exit, Exit 95, toward Littlerock/ Maytown, go 0.2 miles. 2. Take the ramp toward Littlerock and merge onto Maytown Rd SW, go 2.9 miles. 3. Maytown Rd SW becomes 128th Ave SW, go 0.8 miles. 4. Turn Left onto Mima Rd SW. go 3.1 miles. 5. Turn Slight right onto Gate Rd SW, go 2.2 miles. 6. End at Parking Area on left side of road.
    Parking/Restroom Information
    Parking Area for approximately 8 vehicles. No restroom facilities.
    Unique Features
    Unique sedge meadow. Rough cut trail goes from parking area to the river.

    The 915-acre Scatter Creek Unit is located 15 miles south of Olympia. It contains the unique south Puget Sound prairie ecosystem, which supports a variety of imperiled plant and animal species. Also found are riparian, wetland and forest habitats, including a one-mile stretch of Scatter Creek and an Oregon white oak community that is uncommon on the west side of the Cascade Mountains. The primary habitat management focus is the restoration and maintenance of prairie habitats using prescribed fire, exotic plant control, and the re-establishment of native species.

    Popular recreational activities include wildlife viewing, hunting, fishing, dog field trials and training, horseback riding, and botanical studies. Three parking areas and two toilets are available on the area.

    An additional 148 acres of the wildlife area immediately north of Scatter Creek (waterbody) along Case Road is leased from a private landowner. Please adhere to all wildlife area regulations so that this arrangement, and the resulting public benefit, can be maintained into the future.

    Unit Rules and Conditions

    Field Trials and Dog Events

    Horseback Riding

    Horseback riding on the wildlife area is restricted to the designated trailhead and trail located at the 16810 Case Road parking area (See Designated Riding Route). The trail leads to a network of additional trails on private timberlands, including the first encountered private tract that is owned by Port Blakely (Public Access Policy). Visitors are responsible for knowing public access rules that are in place for private land.

    Site History


    Viewing Opportunities

    Birds

  • Birds of Prey
  • Songbirds
  • Upland Birds
  • Wading Birds
  • Mammals

  • Deer
  • Small Mammals
  • Other

  • Butterflies
  • Wildflowers
  • How to Get Here
    Access Site #1
    Driving Directions
    Two parking areas are located at the north parcel along Case Road, Rochester. The northernmost is at 16810 Case Road. The other parking area is 0.4 mile to the south at 17100 Case Road.
    Parking/Restroom Information
    A toilet is located at the 17100 Case Road parking area.
    Other Information
    Horseback riding at the north parcel is restricted to designated trails. See "Horseback Riding" section for details.
    Access Site #2
    Driving Directions
    One parking area is located on the south parcel at 17915 Guava St SW, Rochester.
    Parking/Restroom Information
    A toilet is located at this parking area.
    Other Information
    Horseback riding is not permitted at the south parcel. Dogs must be on leash from April 1 - July 31.
    Unique Features
    South Puget Sound prairies, Mima mounds, Scatter Creek, historic homestead.
    The 960-acre Skookumchuck Unit is located 11 miles northeast of Centralia and downstream from the Skookumchuck Dam in Thurston County. The property is owned and managed by TransAlta for power generation support, as well as for wildlife habitat in accordance with a 1979 mitigation and management agreement with WDFW. The property contains grassland, wetland, farmland, meadow, orchard, and forest habitats that provide habitat for a wide variety of species, including forage and cover for deer and elk. Habitat for upland birds, including pheasant and grouse, also occurs on the Skookumchuck Unit. Other species found on the unit include, pileated woodpecker, western bluebird, American dipper, bald eagle, and a variety of amphibian and fish species.

    Hunting Opportunities


    Viewing Opportunities

    Birds

  • Birds of Prey
  • Eagles
  • Songbirds
  • Upland Birds
  • Waterfowl
  • Mammals

  • Bear
  • Deer
  • Elk
  • Small Mammals
  • Other

  • Butterflies
  • Reptiles/Amphibians
  • Spawning Salmon
  • How to Get Here
    Access Site #1
    Driving Directions
    From I-5, take Exit 88 toward Tenino. Continue east on US 12/Old Highway 99 for 7.6 miles, then turn south on WA-507. Continue on WA-507 for 2.2 miles, then turn east onto 184th Ave SW, which becomes Skookumchuck Rd SE after 0.6 miles. Continue east on Skookumchuck Rd SE for 5.3 miles until you reach the Skookumchuck Unit.
    Parking/Restroom Information
    There are four parking areas.
    Other Information
    During pheasant hunting season, regulated hunting hours are from 8:00am to 4:00pm.
    Unique Features
    Pheasant release hunting, salmon steelhead fishing, elk viewing, fish hatchery.
    The largest continuous unit is Scotch Creek’s 8,694 acres, located about 10 miles northwest of Omak and four miles southeast of Conconully. It’s primarily shrub steppe, with some conifer forest and riparian habitat, and 80 acres maintained in agriculture (sharecrop fields). To date, nearly all of the 1,500 acres of old dryland agricultural fields have been restored to native shrub steppe habitat, providing diversity and nesting cover for sharp-tailed grouse. Over 100,000 trees and shrubs have also been planted in wet draws, north slopes, and under irrigation to provide critical winter habitat for sharp-tailed grouse. In recent years between 30 and 40 sharp-tailed grouse have wintered in the water birch plantings near the area headquarters. Scotch Creek, a spring fed stream originating about three miles west of the area boundary, submerges into a marsh area at the eastern boundary. There are no inlets, outlets or tributaries to this 10-mile long perennial stream. Several springs and two lakes are also located on the property. This unit is a major recreation area for both fishing in the summer and deer hunting in the fall.
    Viewing Opportunities

    Birds

  • Birds of Prey
  • Eagles
  • Songbirds
  • Upland Birds
  • Wading Birds
  • Waterfowl
  • Mammals

  • Bear
  • Deer
  • Small Mammals
  • Other

  • Butterflies
  • Reptiles/Amphibians
  • Wildflowers
  • How to Get Here
    Access Site #1
    Driving Directions
    From Omak or Okanogan, follow the Conconully Highway to the northwest toward the town of Conconully. At the junction with the Happy Hill road (approximately m.p. 14) turn right into the parking area next to the fire hall and corrals.
    Parking/Restroom Information
    Undeveloped gravel parking area with reader board. Large enough for trailer turn around. No restrooms available.
    Other Information
    May be un-accessable during periods of heavy snow.
    Access Site #2
    Driving Directions
    From Omak or Okanogan, follow the Conconully Highway to the northwest toward the town of Conconully. Turn right on Hess Lake road (approximately m.p. 12) and follow to the end. This site accesses the Coulee Creek drainage to the north and connects to the Sinlahekin Wildlife Area approximately 7 miles to the north (by non-motorized trail).
    Parking/Restroom Information
    Large graveled parking big enough for trailer turn around. No restrooms available.
    Other Information
    May be un-accessable during heavy snow periods.
    Unique Features
    Scotch Creek was acquired primarily for the recovery of the Columbian Sharp-tailed grouse and enhancement of shrub steppe habitat. The area is open grasslands, with little public improvments.
    Other Information

    Sharp-tailed grouse
    The Sharp-tailed grouse population is increasing in the Scotch Creek basin, however they are still considered sensitive to public viewing. The best time to see Sharp-tails is in winter along the Conconully Highway in the water birch and other riparian vegetation along Scotch Creek. Especially after a heavy snow. Please do not disturb or flush the birds while in their winter habitat.

    Hunting
    Mule deer hunting is popular on this unit. You can expect crowded conditions at all parking areas during the modern firearm deer season, especially opening weekend. Hunting pressure declines as the season progresses. White tailed deer are also present on the area so know your rules and identify the species before pulling the trigger. Upland bird hunting is also available. Natural production of pheasants, quail, grey partridge (most abundant), chukar partridge, and blue grouse occur here. Note: All lands in Washington State are CLOSED to the taking of Sharp-tailed Grouse including all Scotch Creek Wildlife Area Units. The WDFW is very concerned with the accidental take of this protected species. Again, know your target before pulling the trigger. Other wildlife species you may encounter include black bear, cougar, bobcat and, the western rattlesnake. Hunting seasons vary depending on species, consult Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife hunting regulations for seasons and dates.

    Fishing
    Fishing opportunity is limited on this unit. Scotch Creek contains brook trout, and is open to fishing with-in season, however the largest fish rarely exceeds 6”. Other waters of the unit do not contain fish. However WDFW access sites within driving distance that offer fishing include, Blue Lake and Green Lake. Additional fishing opportunities can be found on the Sinlahekin Wildlife Area to the north and both the upper and lower Conconully reservoirs. Consult Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife Fishing Regulations for further information on seasons and the Sinlahekin Wildlife Area Homepage.

    Camping
    Camping is permitted adjacent to established roads. Firewood can be gathered from downed dead wood only and must remain on the wildlife area. Fire restrictions are governed by the Washington Department of Natural Resources and Okanogan County. Consult WDNR website for up to date fire restrictions. Length of stay is limited to 14 days.

    Other Recreation
    Hiking, biking and horseback riding. Non-motorized recreational activities are allowed, however currently there are no developed trail systems. Established parking areas (mentioned above) allow easy access for cars, or trucks with trailers, and each have gate access through boundary fences. Farm roads provide the only “trail” system on this unit and dispersed riding or hiking is encouraged.

    Wildlife Observations and Photography
    Wildlife viewing and photography encompasses a vast number of wildlife species. During the winter, deer can be viewed roaming the hills with eagles and hawks soaring high above in the sky. Wintering upland birds and waterfowl can be seen in the riparian areas and ponds, and in the spring numerous songbirds and blue birds can be heard and seen.

    Ellemeham consists of 1,462 acres on Ellemeham Mountain. The unit is predominately sagebrush-steppe with some aspen. There is some scattered ponderosa pine in the southwestern portion of the area that is associated with small ponds and intermittent streams. The north slope of Ellemeham is excellent quality bunch grass/forb community with bluebunch wheatgrass. The unit is known for good mule deer hunting.


    Viewing Opportunities

    Birds

  • Upland Birds
  • Mammals

  • Deer
  • How to Get Here
    Access Site #1
    Driving Directions

    From the center of Oroville: Turn west on old Highway 7. Cross the river and head south for approximately 1 mile. Turn right on Ellemeham Road for .5 mi and turn right on Ellemeham Mountain Road. Follow this out of the orchard country where it will turn to a dirt surface and continue for approximately 6 miles. The first of two WDFW parking lots will be on your right. The trailhead at this location will take you over the ridge and all the way to the Similkameen River.

    Continue on Ellemeham Mountain Road another 2 miles to the second parking area. This location will access the western portion of the area.

    Parking/Restroom Information
    Both parking locations are undeveloped grass parking areas with reader boards. Not large enough for trailer turn around, so trailers will need to park adjacent to the county road. No restrooms available.
    Unique Features
    The Ellemeham unit was formerly known as the Cutchie property. This acquisition in 2010 also included lands along the Similkameen River in the Chopaka valley. This unit is managed separately due to its geographical and habitat differences.
    Other Information

    Hunting
    The area on Ellemeham Mountain is known for good mule deer hunting. The habitat is excellent winter range, and deer will migrate into this area from higher elevations to the west and in the Pasayten Wilderness Area. Access can be difficult so expect a long pack out if you are successful. Also the lands surrounding the wildlife area are predominately private. Be sure to have good maps and respect private property.

    Fishing
    No fishing opportunities occur on this wildlife area.

    Camping
    Camping is restricted to the two parking areas mentioned above. Campfire restrictions will be announced in the fall if hot dry conditions persist into the fall.

    Other Recreation
    Non-motorized recreation is welcome on the area. Hiking, biking, and horseback riding are allowed, however the unit gets very steep quickly to the north.

    Wildlife Observations and Photography
    Wildlife viewing and photography encompasses a vast number of wildlife species. Expect shrub-steppe obligate species on this area.

    Buzzard Lake consists of approximately 840 acres located 12 miles west of Okanogan. Steep hillsides surround a broad valley bottom where the 12-acre Buzzard Lake rests on the edge of a large meadow. The dominate habitat in the area is a mixed coniferous forest with scattered patches of sagebrush-steppe. The property was purchased in 2009 for critical mule deer wintering habitat. Grazing is being used within the wildlife unit to improve mule deer forage. Buzzard Lake supports a variety of wildlife including black bears, moose, waterfowl, cougars and song birds. Trout fishing draws the highest number of visitors to this property.


    Viewing Opportunities

    Birds

  • Songbirds
  • Upland Birds
  • Waterfowl
  • Mammals

  • Bear
  • Deer
  • Moose
  • Small Mammals
  • How to Get Here
    Access Site #1
    Driving Directions
    Headed north from Brewster on Old Highway 97 about 2 miles southwest of Malott, turn left (west) onto Chiliwist Road. Proceed uphill about 1 mile to the Chiliwist Wildlife Area. Headed south from Malott on Old Highway 97 about 2 miles soutwest of Malott, turn right (west) onto Chiliwist Road. Proceed uphill about 1 mile to the Chiliwist Wildlife Area.
    Parking/Restroom Information

    From Okanogan – Follow Highway 20 west towards Twisp and the Methow Valley approximately 10 miles. Turn right onto Buzzard Lake Road. Drive approximately 4 miles on Buzzard Lake Road (stay to right). Camping area and boat launch will be on your left.

    From Twisp – Drive south on Highway 153 for 2 miles and take a left onto Highway 20. Follow Highway 20 east towards Okanogan and the Okanogan Valley approximately 20 miles. Turn left onto Buzzard Lake Road. Drive approximately 4 miles on Buzzard Lake Road (stay to right). Camping area and boat launch will be on your left.

    Other Information
    A recently improved primitive campground can be found on the northeast corner of the lake – no restrooms are currently available. A car-top boat launch can be found just south of the campground by following the gravel road leading from the parking area. A reader board at the site is available to read about specific fishing and hunting regulations.
    Other Information
    Private property borders a significant portion of the Buzzard Lake Unit. Please respect private property and follow posted regulations when visiting the wildlife area.
    The 4,351-acre Chesaw unit is in northwest Okanogan County, some four miles south of the Canadian border, about 20 miles east of Oroville. Elevations range from near 3,200 to 4,200 feet. The major habitat type is shrub steppe, with patches of conifers at higher elevations. Mary Ann Creek is a perennial stream that flows through in a southerly direction, with many active and remnant beaver dams. The creek’s flood plain is fairly wide in some areas and riparian vegetation flourishes there and along the stream channel. There are several lakes and man-made ponds, and one of the larger of the unit’s several springs is used as the source of potable water. Chesaw has one sharp-tailed grouse lek site. It also supports mule and white-tailed deer, various upland game birds, bald and golden eagles, peregrine and prairie falcons, northern goshawks, Lewis woodpeckers, and loggerhead shrikes.
    Viewing Opportunities

    Birds

  • Birds of Prey
  • Eagles
  • Shorebirds
  • Songbirds
  • Upland Birds
  • Wading Birds
  • Waterfowl
  • Mammals

  • Bear
  • Deer
  • Small Mammals
  • Other

  • Butterflies
  • Reptiles/Amphibians
  • Wildflowers
  • How to Get Here
    Access Site #1
    Driving Directions
    From Oroville Washington, travel east on the Chesaw road approximately 15 miles. Turn left on Mary ann Creek road, the Byers road out of Chesaw, or continue on the Bolster road. Access to the remote wildlife area is adjacent to one of these three roads. No parking lots have been developed.
    Unique Features
    No public improvements have been made to this remote area.
    Other Information
    Sharp-tailed grouse
    The shrub-steppe lands around Chesaw are home to the threatened species, the Columbian Sharp-tailed grouse. Habitat improvements have been on-going since acquisition in 1991.

    Hunting
    Opportunities include primarily whitetail deer and mule deer. Forest grouse hunting including ruffed grouse and blue grouse can be good for those who like to hike. Black bear and cougar are also present on the area at times. Hunting seasons vary depending on species and choice of weapon, consult Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife hunting regulations for seasons and dates. Note: All lands in Washington State are closed to the taking of Sharp-tail Grouse including Chesaw and all Scotch Creek Wildlife Area Units.

    Fishing
    The only fish bearing waters on the Chesaw Wildlife Area is Mary Ann Creek, which provides resident trout fishing. Plans for 2006 include electro-shocking this stream to determine fish species composition and length frequencies. Other fishing opportunities can be found in nearby Myers creek, and at WDFW Molson and Sidley lakes.


    Camping
    The Chesaw Unit offers pack-in style camping. Developed camping opportunities are limited. Firewood can be gathered from downed dead wood only and must remain on the wildlife area. Fire restrictions are governed by the Washington Department of Natural Resources and Okanogan County. Consult WDNR website for up to date fire restrictions. Length of stay is limited to 14 days. Undeveloped camping opportunities can be found at WDFW Molson/Sidley lake access areas.

    Other Recreation
    Hiking, biking and horseback riding:. Non-motorized recreational activities are allowed, however currently there are no developed trail systems. Farm roads and logging roads provide the only “trail” system on the area, which are closed to motorized vehicles. Access points to the wildlife area are through gates located off of Mary Ann Creek and Byers roads.

    Wildlife Observations and Photography
    Wildlife viewing and photography encompasses a vast number of wildlife species. Deer can be viewed year round in the open rolling hills with eagles and hawks soaring high above in the sky. Wintering upland birds and waterfowl can be seen in the riparian areas and beaver ponds and in the spring numerous songbirds can be heard and seen.

    The Pogue Mountain unit’s 1,196 acres are located four miles northwest of Omak and west of the Conconully Highway. Elevations vary from 1,600 feet to 2,800 feet at the top of Pogue Mountain. The mountainous property is predominately shrub steppe and scattered conifers, with tall stands of mature big sagebrush along the lower elevations. The area was used primarily for cattle grazing and timber harvest as part of the Metcalf ranch operation prior to WDFW purchase in 1991. The unit is managed as mule deer winter range, however there are historical accounts of sharp-tailed grouse use on the lower elevations. Public access is difficult as both roads leading to the property cross private land.
    Viewing Opportunities

    Birds

  • Birds of Prey
  • Eagles
  • Songbirds
  • Upland Birds
  • Mammals

  • Bear
  • Deer
  • Small Mammals
  • Other

  • Butterflies
  • Reptiles/Amphibians
  • Wildflowers
  • How to Get Here
    Access Site #1
    Driving Directions
    From Okanogan, Washington, take the salmon creek road approximately 8 miles. Take a right on the Green lake road and continue about another 4 miles to Green Lake. The parking and campground are on the left. The Pogue Mountain unit is steep and rugged from this direction, but this is the only access from public lands.
    Parking/Restroom Information
    Parking, camping, restrooms, fishing and a boat launch is available at the Green Lake access site. Hiking to the more remote areas of Pogue Mountain is to the east from this campground. However only those in good physical shape should plan a trip from this direction as the hike is steep and rocky.
    Other Information
    None
    Access Site #2
    Driving Directions
    It is possible to access the Pogue Mountain unit from the Conconully Highway along Pogue flats, just 3 miles northwest of Omak. However from this direction you will need permission from private landowners as the unit is bordered on the north, east, and south by private lands.
    Parking/Restroom Information
    None
    Other Information
    None
    Unique Features
    Green Lake offers camping and fishing adjacent to the 1,196 acre wildlife unit.
    Other Information

    Hunting
    Opportunities for hunting game animals include mule deer, white-tailed deer, quail, ruffed grouse, blue grouse, black bear, cougar, and bobcat. Hunting seasons vary depending on species and weapon choice, consult Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife hunting regulations for seasons and dates.

    Fishing
    There are no fish bearing waterways on Pogue Mountain. Fishing opportunities with in driving distance-offering fishing include, Blue Lake (Limebelt), Green Lake and Little Green Lake.

    Name Boat Launch Toilet Camp Special Information
    Blue Lake - Limebelt X   X Car top launch only
    Green Lake X X X  
    Little Green Lake X X    

    Additional fishing opportunities can be found on the Sinlahekin Wildlife Area to the north and both upper and lower Conconully reservoirs. Consult Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife Fishing Regulations for further information on seasons and the Sinlahekin Wildlife Area Homepage.

    Camping
    The Pogue Mountain unit offers pack-in style camping. Firewood can be gathered from downed dead wood only and must remain on the wildlife area. Campfire restrictions are governed by the Washington Department of Natural Resources and Okanogan County. Consult WDNR website for up to date fire restrictions. Length of stay is limited to 14 days. Additional developed camping opportunities can be found at Blue Lake (Limebelt), Green Lake and Little Green Lake Access Areas, Conconully State Park, and the Sinlahekin Wildlife Area.

    Other Recreation
    Hiking, biking and horseback riding. Non-motorized recreational activities are allowed, however currently there are no developed trail systems on the Pogue Mountain unit. Numerous logging roads traverse this unit and can be used as trail systems, however currently there are no parking areas or off-loading facilities available. Permission from private landowners on the north, east and south boundaries of this unit must be obtained to avoid trespass complaints.

    Wildlife Observations and Photography
    Wildlife viewing and photography encompasses a vast number of wildlife species. During the winter, deer can be viewed roaming the hills with eagles and hawks soaring high above in the sky. In the spring numerous songbirds can be heard and seen.

    The Tunk Valley unit’s 1,399 acres are located about 12 miles northeast of Omak in the Tunk Valley of Okanogan County. Elevations vary from 1,800 feet to 3,200 feet. With gentle topography and a mostly north-facing aspect, it includes about two miles of Tunk Creek and its riparian trees and shrubs. It also has several springs and one man made pond. Most of the habitat is shrub steppe, with a small stand of timber on the steep north slope in the center of the property. A large flock of 64 sharp-tailed grouse were observed along Tunk Creek in the winter of 2003. The area also supports mule and white-tailed deer, ruffed grouse, California quail, gray partridge, hawks, owls, woodpeckers and other cavity-nesting birds, and many species of songbirds. Tunk Creek has rainbow and brook trout.
    Viewing Opportunities

    Birds

  • Birds of Prey
  • Eagles
  • Songbirds
  • Upland Birds
  • Mammals

  • Bear
  • Deer
  • Small Mammals
  • Other

  • Butterflies
  • Reptiles/Amphibians
  • Wildflowers
  • How to Get Here
    Access Site #1
    Driving Directions
    From Omak, Washington continue north on Hwy 97 approximately 5 miles and turn right into Riverside. Cross the bridge across the Okanogan river and continue 1 mile. Turn left on the Tunk Valley road and continue approximately 15 miles. Turn right at the WLA entrance sign and continue uphill to the parking area.
    Parking/Restroom Information
    The fenced and graveled parking area is large enough for trailer turn around. No restrooms available.
    Other Information
    The access road to the parking area is open July 1 - December 15.
    Other Information

    Hunting
    Opportunities include whitetail deer, mule deer, quail, grey partridge, ruffed grouse, blue grouse, black bear, cougar, and bobcat. Hunting seasons vary depending on species and weapon choice, consult Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife hunting regulations for seasons and dates. Note: All lands in Washington State are closed to the taking of Sharp-tail Grouse including all Scotch Creek Wildlife Area Units.

    Fishing
    There are no fish bearing waters on the Tunk Valley unit. Fishing opportunities can be found at USFS Crawfish Lake on the Okanogan National Forest, just east of the wildlife area. Additional information can be obtained at the Okanogan/Wenatchee National Forest Homepage. Consult Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife Fishing regulations for further information on seasons and regulations.

    Camping
    The Tunk Valley unit offers pack-in style camping. No developed sites are available. Firewood can be gathered from downed dead wood only and must remain on the wildlife area. Campfire restrictions are governed by the Washington Department of Natural Resources and Okanogan County. Consult WDNR website for up to date fire restrictions. Length of stay is limited to 14 days. Developed camping is available on the Okanogan National Forest at Crawfish Lake. Additional information can be obtained at the Okanogan/Wenatchee National Forest Homepage.

    Other Recreation
    Hiking, biking and horseback riding. Non-motorized recreational activities are allowed, however currently there are no developed trail systems on this unit. Farm roads cross the unit and provide the only “trail “ system on the area. Established parking areas allow access for cars, as well as room for truck and trailer turnaround.

    Wildlife Observations and Photography
    Wildlife viewing and photography encompasses a vast number of wildlife species. During the winter, deer can be viewed roaming the hills with eagles and hawks soaring high above in the sky. Elk and moose have been occasionally observed on this unit, however extremely rare in Okanogan County. Wintering upland birds and waterfowl can be seen in the riparian areas and beaver ponds along Tunk Creek, and in the spring numerous songbirds can be heard and observed.


    Viewing Opportunities

    Birds

  • Birds of Prey
  • Upland Birds
  • Mammals

  • Bear
  • Deer
  • Small Mammals
  • How to Get Here
    Access Site #1
    Driving Directions
    From Colville, drive north on US 395 to intersection with Hwy 20. Turn left onto Hwy 20. Headquarters of the WLA is located a few miles west of the bridge over the Columbia River, on the south side of the highway. A kiosk and parking lot mark the site.
    Parking/Restroom Information
    Public parking available at kiosk at intersection of WLA driveway and Hwy 20. Parking also available at HQ building.
    Other Information
    Daytime parking only. Gate to HQ and its parking lot, and gates to several forest roads, are closed annually for the winter.
    Unique Features
    Mostly forest, dominated by Ponderosa Pine and Douglas Fir, the wildlife area has several miles of forest road. Forest is punctuated with open meadows covered by ceanothus. There are also 100 acres of irrigated alfalfa, 5-10 acres of food plots, and a hayed field in front of the WLA HQ. Pheasants are planted annually for public hunting, at the alfalfa fields. Mule and white-tailed deer, and turkeys, are also hunted.
    The 882-acre North unit includes the northern and eastern portions of the drained Shillapoo lakebed and approximately 1½ miles of shoreline on Lake River. Several sharecrop fields are located on this unit.
    Viewing Opportunities

    Birds

  • Birds of Prey
  • Eagles
  • Marine Birds
  • Shorebirds
  • Songbirds
  • Wading Birds
  • Waterfowl
  • Mammals

  • Deer
  • Small Mammals
  • How to Get Here
    Access Site #1
    Driving Directions
    From the east: Take Exit 1D (Fourth Plain) on Interstate 5. Turn west onto Fourth Plain. After 2 miles Fourth Plain splits, head to the northwest on highway 501. After about three miles 501 splits going continuing going north on Highway 501. This will dead end after 2 miles and the North Unit will be on the west side of the Highway. Turning west at the split with Highway 501 and Lower River will go to the west side of the North unit.
    Parking/Restroom Information
    There are small pull outs along highway 501 and Lower River Road, but there are no restrooms.
    Other Information
    Target shooting is prohibited during migratory and upland bird seasons.
    Unique Features
    Shillapoo Wildlife Area was established to protect and enhance wintering waterfowl habitat.
    Other Information
    The wildlife area is in a restricted firearm use zone, in which only shotguns and bow and arrow equipment can be used. The use of rifles and pistols here is prohibited under county rules. Dog training is not allowed on this unit from the end of waterfowl season through April 15th each year. The public is also asked to not enter the unit during the same time period to provide a disturbance free area for wintering waterfowl and sandhill cranes.
    The 1,012-acre South unit includes three acquired properties that historically were used for dairy production. One of the largest great blue heron rookeries on the lower Columbia River is on this unit. In 2000, this rookery contained more than 350 active nests; by 2001, however, the nesting site was abandoned, most likely due to drought conditions affecting forage or an increase in bald eagle activity in the area. A second newer rookery, also on the South unit, grew substantially to 142 active nests in the same year.

    In 2004, the first phase of restoring Shillapoo lakebed wetland vegetation was completed. In collaboration with Ducks Unlimited and the Natural Resource Conservation Service (NRCS), this project intends to build a water control levee to isolate and prevent the drainage of 150 acres at the south end of the historic water body. In cooperation with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, another project is in the design stage to restore the wetland hydrology to the remaining parts of the lakebed that are owned by WDFW.


    Viewing Opportunities

    Birds

  • Birds of Prey
  • Eagles
  • Marine Birds
  • Shorebirds
  • Songbirds
  • Wading Birds
  • Waterfowl
  • Mammals

  • Deer
  • How to Get Here
    Access Site #1
    Driving Directions
    From the east: Take Exit 1D (Fourth Plain) on Interstate 5. Turn west onto Fourth Plain. After 2 miles Fourth Plain splits, head to the northwest on highway 501. After about three miles 501 splits going continuing going north on Highway 501. This will dead end after about 1 mile and the south Unit will be on the west side of the Highway and will join the North Unit. Turning west at the split with Highway 501 and Lower River will go to the west side of the South unit.
    Parking/Restroom Information
    There are three parking areas off of Lower River Road in the South Unit, and one vault toilet.
    Other Information
    Target shooting in prohibited during migratory and upland bird seassons. The unit is closed to dog training from April 15th to July 1st.
    Unique Features
    The South Unit is a pheasant release site, but is still managed primarily for waterfowl wintering habitat.
    Other Information
    Dog training is not allowed on this unit from the end of waterfowl season through April 15th each year. The public is also asked to not enter the unit during the same time period to provide a disturbance free area for wintering waterfowl and sandhill cranes. Trap Shooting is prohibited during upland bird and waterfowl seasons. There is no designated area. Use of rifles and pistols is prohibited here under county rules.
    The 477-acre unit at the south end of Vancouver Lake was acquired as two separate parcels. This unit is very popular with the public and receives a wide variety of uses due to its close proximity to Vancouver. A boat launch is located on the south shore.

    WDFW has provided assistance to County Parks and other groups to restore wetland habitat around Vancouver Lake. The Clark Public Utilities has provided the water supply needed to successfully manage the wetland basins on the County Parks and WDFW properties.

    Viewing Opportunities

    Birds

  • Birds of Prey
  • Eagles
  • Marine Birds
  • Shorebirds
  • Songbirds
  • Wading Birds
  • Waterfowl
  • Mammals

  • Deer
  • How to Get Here
    Access Site #1
    Driving Directions
    From the east and south: Take exit 1D (Fourth Plain)off of Interstate 5. Turn west onto Fourth Plain and go about 2 miles to Fruit Valley RD. Turn north onto Fruit Valley Rd. then west onto La Frambois RD. Go .5 miles on La Frambois Rd and the Vancouver Lake unit will be on the west side of the road. The road will dead end at Vancouver Lake.
    Parking/Restroom Information
    There are two parking lots in this unit and one vault toilet.
    Other Information
    Target shooting is prohibited during migratory and upland hunting seasons. The unit closed to dog training from April 15th to July 1st.
    Access Site #2
    Driving Directions
    From the north: Take exit 4 (78 th Street) off of Interstate 5. Turn west onto NW 78th Street, and go to Fruit Valley Road. Turn south onto Fruit Valley Rd and go about 2 miles to La Frmbois RD. Turn west onto La Frambois Rd and follow the road on to the wildlife area.
    Parking/Restroom Information
    There are two parking lots in this unit and one vault toilet.
    Other Information
    Target shooting is prohibited during migratory and upland hunting seasons. The unit closed to dog training from April 15th to July 1st.
    Unique Features
    This unit is a pheasant release site, but is still primarily managed for wintering waterfowl habitat. There is a boat launch at this unit to Vancouver Lake.
    Other Information
    Off road driving and ATVs are prohibited. Trap shooting on this unit is only allowed in the designated area behind the kiosk located at the first parking lot. No trap shooting during upland bird and waterfowl seasons. Use of rifles and pistols is prohibited. Dog training is not allowed from April 15th through July 1st each year.
    Located 2.5 miles south of Loomis, the Sinlahekin unit’s 14,314 acres include 480 acres leased from Washington Department of Natural Resources (DNR), 2,834 acres owned by the U.S. Bureau of Land Management (BLM), and 11,000 acres owned by WDFW. The Sinlahekin lies primarily within the Sinlahekin Valley, a north–south-running, deep, glaciated valley with sheer rock sidewalls rising from the valley floor, which ranges from about one-half to one mile wide. The property is within both the Sinlahekin Creek and the Coulee Creek watersheds. Sinlahekin Creek is the major flowing water body, while Coulee Creek goes underground most of the year. There are five impoundments and several natural ponds. Dominant habitat types are shrub steppe (bluebunch wheatgrass, big sage, bitterbrush, serviceberry), wetland (hawthorn, water birch, mountain alder, grass/sedges), and dry forest (Ponderosa pine, Douglas fir). WDFW farms about 145 acres for wildlife forage under two sharecrop agreements, and four grazing permits are used to manipulate vegetation.

    The Sinlahekin has more than 510 vascular plant species (including nine rare ones), over 215 species of birds, 60 species of mammals, about 20 species of reptiles and amphibians, over 25 species of fish, and over 90 species of butterflies. Mule deer, bighorn sheep, moose, black bear, cougar, waterfowl, wild turkey, forest grouse and rainbow trout contribute to the popularity of hunting and fishing here.

    Red-tailed hawk Photo Gallery
    Wildlife Area staff have put together a great photo and video gallery. Take a look!
      Volunteer!
    Join in a citizen science initiative to conduct long-term Ecological Integrity Monitoring Learn More!

    Viewing Opportunities

    Birds

  • Birds of Prey
  • Eagles
  • Shorebirds
  • Songbirds
  • Upland Birds
  • Wading Birds
  • Waterfowl
  • Mammals

  • Bear
  • Bighorn sheep
  • Deer
  • Elk
  • Moose
  • Mountain Goats
  • Small Mammals
  • Other

  • Butterflies
  • Reptiles/Amphibians
  • Wildflowers
  • How to Get Here
    Access Site #1
    Driving Directions

    From Tonasket west on 4th Ave across Okanogan River to the Hwy 7 Junction. Turn right (north) on Hwy 7 and proceed north to the Loomis Hwy Junction continuing on (west) to Loomis. Drive through Loomis and proceed straight (west) into a sweeping left turn onto Broadway Street which turns into Sinlahekin Road. Proceed south on Sinlahekin Road about 3 miles where the road enters SWA.

    From Riverside north on SR 97 to about Mile Post 304.6. Turn left (west) on the South Pine Creek Road. Proceed west about 7 miles where road enters SWA.

    From Oroville south on SR 97 to Ellisforde, turn right (west) on Ellisforde Bridge Road. Proceed west about .75 miles then turn left (south) on Hwy 7. Proceed south to the Loomis Hwy Junction and Hwy 7. Turn right (west) onto Loomis Hwy and proceed west to Loomis. Drive through Loomis and proceed straight (west) into a sweeping left turn onto Broadway Street which turns into Sinlahekin Road. Proceed south on Sinlahekin Road about 3 miles where the road enters SWA.

    From Conconully proceed east out of Conconully on the Conconully-Fish Lake Road and follow road past Sugar Loaf Lake and over Sugar Loaf Pass to where the road enters SWA.

    Parking/Restroom Information
    See listing of Sinlahekin Access Sites and Facility Information
    Other Information
    Vehicles are restricted from Sinlahekin access roads during mud season.
    Unique Features
    An ADA trail leading to an ADA view blind and and ADA fishing pier are located at Conner Lake. An ADA trail is located to the northwest of Blue Lake leading to a viewing blind on the west side of Blue Lake. There is about 8 miles of trail from Headquarters and Conner Lake to about 1 mile north of Fish Lake - Hunter Camp Access Site. These trails are available to hikers, horseback riders with portions for ADA use. Additional trail features include 2 Kiosks, 2 interpretive signs, and 6 view blinds. Bird and butterfly watching opportunities exist all along the trails. Wildflower enthusiasts will also find subjects to interest them.

    The Driscoll-Eyhott Island unit consists of about 325 acres of mostly riparian and wetland habitat located about one mile south of Oroville, at the confluence of the Similkameen and Okanogan rivers. Due to its low elevation (920 feet), the unit experiences moderate flooding during high water events in spring and early summer. The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) purchased Driscoll Island in 1974 and added Eyhott Island to the unit in 2007.

    When the unit was initially established, a primary management goal was to provide goose nesting and foraging habitat. Grazing was once used to improve goose forage, but was discontinued since Canada goose populations have returned to healthy numbers. The unit is still used for agricultural purposes. Hay and grain production enhances forage for upland game birds and provides cover for a variety of species.

    River channels surrounding Driscoll Island provide migration and spawning habitat for steelhead, fall chinook salmon and Osoyoos sockeye salmon. The unit supports a small mule and white-tail deer population as well as a variety of songbird, waterfowl, reptile and amphibian species. Hunting, fishing, and wildlife viewing are all popular activities on the island. However, access to Driscoll and Eyhott Islands is only possible by fording across the Okanogan River during low flows. One could also access the unit by floating the Okanogan and Similkameen Rivers from upstream using a number of water access points.


    Viewing Opportunities

    Birds

  • Birds of Prey
  • Eagles
  • Shorebirds
  • Songbirds
  • Upland Birds
  • Waterfowl
  • Mammals

  • Deer
  • Other

  • Butterflies
  • Reptiles/Amphibians
  • Spawning Salmon
  • How to Get Here
    Access Site #1
    Driving Directions
    From Oroville proceed south on SR 97. Watch for Public Access sign on right (west) side of hwy about .25 miles after crossing the Okanogan River. Turn right (west) just before sign and cross railroad tracks turning right into the parking lot.

    From Ellisforde proceed north on SR 97 to about Mile Post 329. Watch for Public Access sign on left (west) side of SR 97. Turn left (west) just before sign and cross railroad tracks turning right into the parking lot.

    Parking/Restroom Information
    Parking is available at the Driscoll Island parking lot and the SR-97 Bridge access area south of Oroville. No restrooms available.

    See listing of Driscoll-Eyhott Islands Access Sites and Facility Information

    Unique Features
    Access to these islands is by wading during low water (July 15 to April 15) or by boat during high water (April 15 to July 15). There are no developed visitor or recreational facilities on Driscoll-Eyhott Island Wildlife Area. Sometimes bighorn sheep may be visible on the rock bluffs and cliffs across SR 97 from Driscoll and/or Eyhott Islands. Salmon can be seen in the Similkameen River channel during fall spawning season from the northwest shoreline of Driscoll Island. It is also a popular place for shore fishermen to fish for steelhead.

    The Chiliwist wildlife unit encompasses approximately 4,890 acres, located west of the town of Malott. The Bureau of Land Management owns an additional 760 acres within the wildlife unit’s boundaries. Chiliwist Creek runs west to east through the unit, which has an elevation ranging from 1,000 feet to nearly 3,100 feet on the top of Chiliwist Butte.

    Habitat types include shrub-steppe, wetland, riparian, rocks and cliffs, and dry forests. An agricultural lease and a grazing permit are used on the wildlife area to manipulate vegetation to improve mule deer forage. The Chiliwist was purchased in 1977 primarily for critical mule deer wintering habitat. In addition to a healthy mule deer population, the Chiliwist also provides habitat for white-tailed deer, black bears, migratory birds, cougars, badgers and coyotes. Upland gamebird hunting is a popular activity on the wildlife area, where forest grouse, Hungarian partridge, chukar, quail and turkey can be found. Other activities enjoyed on the Chiliwist include hiking, horseback riding, bird watching and photography.


    Viewing Opportunities

    Birds

  • Birds of Prey
  • Eagles
  • Songbirds
  • Upland Birds
  • Mammals

  • Bear
  • Deer
  • Small Mammals
  • Other

  • Butterflies
  • Reptiles/Amphibians
  • Wildflowers
  • How to Get Here
    Access Site #1
    Driving Directions
    Headed north from Brewster on Old Highway 97 about 2 miles southwest of Malott, turn left (west) onto Chiliwist Road. Proceed uphill about 1 mile to the Chiliwist Wildlife Area. Headed south from Malott on Old Highway 97 about 2 miles soutwest of Malott, turn right (west) onto Chiliwist Road. Proceed uphill about 1 mile to the Chiliwist Wildlife Area.
    Parking/Restroom Information
    Parking and restroom on right (East) side of Chiliwist Rd about .3 miles past entrance to Chiliwist Wildlife Area. Additional parking at beginning of Chiliwist Butte Rd.

    See listing of Chiliwist Access Sites and Facility Information

    Other Information
    Request people avoid using roads during mud season
    Other Information
    In July 2014, the Carlton Complex Fire burned through the entire Chiliwist wildlife unit. Roads and infrastructure were significantly damaged and it will take years to rebuild what was lost. The campground adjacent to Chiliwist Road on the east side of the wildlife unit remains open with a restroom facility still available. Please be cautious of standing, burned trees which could fall at any given time.
    This is a forested island south of Mt. Vernon, at the head of the Skagit River delta where it splits into north and south forks on its way to Skagit Bay. The Washington Department of Natural Resources (DNR) transferred ownership of this 169-acre parcel to WDFW in 2001. It is representative of a historic habitat type of the Skagit Valley (prior to logging and development) that supports a variety of forest birds and raptors, primarily buteos and eagles.

    This unit is closed to the public at this time to protect sensitive wildlife, particularly bald eagle nesting and roosting habitat.


    Viewing Opportunities

    Birds

  • Birds of Prey
  • Eagles
  • Songbirds
  • Waterfowl
  • Mammals

  • Deer
  • Small Mammals
  • Other

  • Butterflies
  • Reptiles/Amphibians
  • Spawning Salmon
  • Wildflowers
  • How to Get Here
    No information available.
    This managed agricultural land (225 acres on the south side of Fir Island Road) was purchased in 1995 to create an upland snow goose reserve. This non-hunted Game Reserve is managed to provide a winter feeding and resting area for snow geese adjacent to the Skagit Bay estuary. The management of this site occurs through a lease agreement with a local farmer who plants a commercial agricultural crop that is harvested, and an over-wintered cover crop of winter wheat for snow goose forage.

    This area is part of the tidal delta of the Skagit River flanked by Dry Slough on the east and Brown’s Slough on the west. In the late 1800’s, following human settlement, dikes were built and the land was converted to agricultural uses.

    Following the Endangered Species Act listing of Chinook salmon as threatened in 1999, and the subsequent development of the Skagit Chinook Recovery Plan, this site was identified as a prime location for the implementation of a restoration project to improve salmon habitat. During the spring and summer of 2015, year one of a two-year salmon habitat recovery project began. This project restores approximately 130 acres of the site to intertidal estuary while maintaining 100 acres of agricultural land for snow goose forage. This Unit is a popular wildlife watching site, and has a gravel road and parking area with two ADA parking spots.


    Viewing Opportunities

    Birds

  • Birds of Prey
  • Eagles
  • Marine Birds
  • Shorebirds
  • Songbirds
  • Wading Birds
  • Waterfowl
  • How to Get Here
    Access Site #1
    Driving Directions
    From Interstate 5, take Exit 221 (Lake McMurray/Conway) and turn west. Drive 0.1 mile. Turn right (west) onto Fir Island Road. Drive west 3.2 miles. Turn left (south) at Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife sign. Drive 0.5 mile to parking area.
    Parking/Restroom Information
    There is a parking area on this Unit.
    Other Information
    This area is closed during hours of darkness.

    The area will also be closed during the Spring and Summer of 2016 to complete the estuary restoration project.

    Unique Features
    The Fir Island Farms Snow Goose Reserve attracts thousands of snow geese from October until April. There is a short trail along the dike offering views of Skagit Bay and opportunities for shorebird and waterfowl viewing. No hunting is allowed at this site.

    This site is currently undergoing some major habitat changes. Approximately 130 acres of the site are being restored to intertidal estuary. The first year of construction has been completed and the dike set back project will occur during the summer of 2016. To learn more click on the link above.

    Other Information
    Various shorebird, waterfowl, and raptor species to include Bald eagles, northern harriers, red tail hawks are common here throughout the winter. An active bald eagle nest is located in a tree on the west side of the entrance road.

    This 331-acre site is located on the north side of Francis Road, southwest of Sedro Woolley and northeast of Mount Vernon. The property was purchased in 1995-97 to protect a popular swan night roost site and to provide a non-hunted upland reserve for trumpeter and tundra swans where they can feed and rest during the winter.  Habitats on the site include lowland riparian forest, a backwater slough of the Skagit River (DeBay’s Slough), and managed agricultural fields.

    The majority of the acreage on this Unit is managed as a Game Reserve for swans with restricted access and no hunting. Public access in the Game Reserve area is restricted to the parking/viewing area at the end of DeBay Isle Road and the mowed walking trail in the grass field near the parking area. The Game Reserve parking area includes ADA parking and a raised mound from which to view the field to the west.

    Skagit Wildlife Area - DeBay Slough
    Game Reserve and Hunt Unit Map

    Waterfowl hunting is allowed on the eastern side of the property, including the portion of DeBay’s Slough to the north of DeBay Isle Road and a 35 acre field north of the Hunt Unit parking lot on Francis Road and east of DeBay’s Slough. The Hunt Unit field is typically planted with barley and corn. The Hunt Unit is subject to a 15-shell daily limit. According to WAC 232-16-770, “It is unlawful to have in possession more than 15 shotgun shells or to fire (shoot) more than 15 shells in one day” on this Unit. Hunters are not allowed to return to their vehicle for more shells after entering the field with their 15 shells.

    Please review the Game Reserve description (WAC 232-16-800) before hunting near this area. 

    The forage on the site is managed through a lease agreement with a local farmer who produces a commercial crop but also plants corn and other forage crops for swans and other waterfowl to utilize. 


    Viewing Opportunities

    Birds

  • Birds of Prey
  • Eagles
  • Songbirds
  • Waterfowl
  • Mammals

  • Deer
  • Small Mammals
  • How to Get Here
    Access Site #1
    Driving Directions
    From I-5 northbound, take the College Way exit (#227) in Mt. Vernon, east to La Venture Road. Turn left (north), and continue on this road (it turns into Francis Road) for a few miles as it snakes its way northeast through the flats. At a 90-degree corner, you will see a Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife sign adjacent to the Hunt Unit parking area, and a short gravel road called DeBay Isle Road. You may turn left down DeBay Isle Road to get to the Game Reserve area. If the gate at the end of the road is closed, you may park in the parking area on Francis Road and walk in.
    Parking/Restroom Information
    There two parking areas at this Unit.
    Other Information
    This Unit is closed during hours of darkness except during legal hunting seasons on the site.
    Unique Features
    The area to the south of DeBay Isle Road and west of DeBay's Slough is a Game Reserve. The area to the north of DeBay Isle Road and east of the slough is open to hunting, including the fields to the north of the Francis Road parking lot.
    Other Information
    Swans typically roost during the night on DeBay's Slough. A variety of waterfowl also use the slough and fields on the Reserve.

    This 190-acre tidal marsh (estuary) on Fir Island, west of and adjacent to Freshwater Slough, is predominantly vegetated by cattail and sedge and used extensively by waterfowl and other waterbirds. The area is used for waterfowl hunting, fishing, bird dog training and bird watching. The dike-top provides walking access for hunting and bird watching. The trail also attracts dog walkers and joggers. This unit includes a visitor information shelter with seating for about 50 people, a parking lot, and two toilet facilities.

    The Headquarters unit was purchased beginning in 1948 with federal Pittman-Robertson funds for waterfowl hunting. Historically the site was managed to provide agricultural enhancements for winter waterfowl forage. With the Endangered Species Act listing of many salmonid species such as Chinook salmon, habitat management has since shifted to restore estuary habitat. The restoration design which included building setback levees, relocating the Wiley Slough tide gate farther inland, and removing part of the perimeter levee allow tidal and river flows to recreate channels and provide additional natural estuary habitat. This project was completed in the fall of 2009.

    These changes in land management result in access changes for Wildlife Area users.

    • Pheasants will no longer be released on the Headquarters Unit
    • Seasonally flooded fields now have tidal flooding.
    • Field walk in access are impacted by tides.
    • Waterfowl hunting is limited to boats, dike-tops or hunting on foot during low tides.
    • The loop dike-top trail no longer exists and is replaced with a shorter out and back trail.

    Viewing Opportunities

    Birds

  • Birds of Prey
  • Eagles
  • Shorebirds
  • Songbirds
  • Wading Birds
  • Waterfowl
  • Mammals

  • Small Mammals
  • Other

  • Reptiles/Amphibians
  • Wildflowers
  • How to Get Here
    Access Site #1
    Driving Directions
    Take Interstate 5 to Exit 221, just south of Mount Vernon in Skagit County. Go west from the freeway and turn right on to Fir Island Road, following the sign for Conway/La Conner. In 1.8 miles, turn left onto Wylie Road and follow for 1 mile to a T-intersection and a Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife sign. Turn left and follow the signs to either of the two parking lots.
    Parking/Restroom Information
    There are two parking areas, each with a restroom facility.
    Other Information
    This Unit is closed during hours of darkness.
    Unique Features
    This is one of the most popular units on the Skagit Wildlife Area. Activities include duck hunting, wildlife viewing and dog training/walking. Waterfowl hunting seasons typically begins with the early goose and youth waterfowl hunt and opens again in mid-October to the end of January.
    Other Information
    A boat launch at this Unit provides access to the Island Unit and portions of the Skagit River estuary via Freshwater Slough.
    This 273-acre island on the Skagit River’s South Fork is located between Steamboat and Freshwater Sloughs. Deepwater Slough meanders through the island’s center. Prior to WDFW purchase in the 1950s, dike construction, ditching, plowing, filling and conversion to agricultural production altered most of the island’s historic tidal channels.

    In 2002, an estuary restoration project (Deepwater Slough) removed two dams on that slough and reconfigured 14,000 feet of dikes to reconnect flow from Freshwater Slough to six distributary channels of the Skagit River. This returned intertidal connectivity to 230 acres of estuary habitat. The project is estimated to provide rearing habitat for up to 2,000 additional Chinook salmon, as well as migratory waterfowl and shorebird habitat.

    On the remaining agricultural acreage, WDFW continues to plant 130 acres of forage annually for wintering waterfowl and increased hunting opportunities. These crops include barley, corn, fava beans, and millet. Some areas of the Island Unit are also managed for moist-soil plants that are high-value winter forage for ducks, including wild millet, smartweed, yellow nutsedge, Biden, and foxtail (marsh bristle grass). Two water control structures allow for shallow flooding of agricultural fields.

    Waterfowl hunting, fishing, wildlife observation and hiking are allowed; access is by boat only to four landing sites on Freshwater and Steamboat Sloughs. The Island Unit is subject to a 15-shell daily limit. According to WAC 232-16-770, “It is unlawful to have in possession more than 15 shotgun shells or to fire (shoot) more than 15 shells in one day” on this Unit. Hunters are not allowed to return to their vehicle or boat for more shells after entering the field with their 15 shells.

    Skagit Wildlife Area - Island Unit
    Boat Landing Sites

    Viewing Opportunities

    Birds

  • Birds of Prey
  • Eagles
  • Marine Birds
  • Shorebirds
  • Songbirds
  • Upland Birds
  • Wading Birds
  • Waterfowl
  • Mammals

  • Deer
  • Small Mammals
  • Other

  • Butterflies
  • Reptiles/Amphibians
  • How to Get Here
    Access Site #1
    Driving Directions
    Take Interstate 5 to Exit 221, just south of Mount Vernon in Skagit County. Go west from the freeway to Fir Island Road, following the sign for Conway/La Conner. In 1.8 miles, turn left onto Wylie Road and follow for 1 mile to a T-intersection and a Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife sign. Turn left, following the sign for the boat launch; the parking lot is a few hundred yards ahead. After launching your boat, proceed upstream (left) a couple hundred yards to the sand beach on the opposite side of the river.
    Parking/Restroom Information
    Parking and restrooms are available at the boat launch at the Headquarters Unit.
    Other Information
    This Unit is closed during hours of darkness except during legal hunting seasons.
    Unique Features
    This is a popular waterfowl hunting area. A boat is needed to access the Unit from the Headquarters boat launch. Be aware of river and tidal conditions. A series of dikes provides easy walking access once you are on the island.
    Other Information
    A mixture of natural and agricultural crops is grown on the Island Unit to enhance food resources for wintering waterfowl and provide improved hunting opportunity.
    Prior to the 1940s, the USFWS owned 7,425 acres of inter-tidal marsh and second-class tidelands on Skagit Bay. In 1959 land exchange agreement, the federal government conveyed all of its bay ownership to the Washington Department of Game for Columbia white-tailed deer habitat in southwest Washington. With additional acquisitions over the years, WDFW now owns about 13,000 acres of estuary in Skagit, Snohomish and Island counties. There are six access sites (Headquarters, Milltown, Big Ditch, Jensen, North Fork, and Davis Slough) and one boat ramp (Headquarters Unit) for waterfowl hunting, fishing, wildlife observation, hiking, boating and kayaking.

    The Skagit estuary contains critical habitats for waterfowl, shorebirds, fish and other aquatic species. Prior to conversion, the Skagit estuary covered approximately 25,766 acres. It is estimated that 75 percent of the historic estuary habitat has been lost due to dike building, water diversion, and drainage before the turn of the century, and changes in the frequency and magnitude of flood events on the Skagit and Stillaguamish rivers. Upper Skagit River hydroelectric dams have also contributed to the loss of estuary habitat. WDFW is working with the Skagit River System Cooperative to restore natural hydrologic processes in the estuary to benefit salmon, waterfowl, shorebirds, and other aquatic species.

    Viewing Opportunities

    Birds

  • Birds of Prey
  • Eagles
  • Marine Birds
  • Shorebirds
  • Songbirds
  • Wading Birds
  • Waterfowl
  • Mammals

  • Small Mammals
  • Other

  • Reptiles/Amphibians
  • How to Get Here
    Access Site #1
    Driving Directions
    Take Interstate 5 to Exit 221, just south of Mount Vernon in Skagit County. Go west from the freeway to Fir Island Road, following the sign for Conway/La Conner. In 1.8 miles, turn left onto Wylie Road and follow for 1 mile to a T-intersection and a Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife sign. Turn left, following the sign for the boat launch. The estuary can be accessed by going downstream from the boat launch.
    Parking/Restroom Information
    Parking and restrooms are located at the Headquarters boat launch.
    Other Information
    This Unit is closed during hours of darkness.
    Other Information
    Tides and river levels may restrict access. You must carry and be able to understand a tidebook (tides here closely resemble those listed under "Seattle" in Puget Sound tidebooks).
    WDFW purchased 410 acres of agricultural land between Samish Island Road and Padilla Bay in northwest Skagit County between 1996 and 2000. Past and current wetland enhancement projects have improved water management and wetland function of the Unit over the years. Components of these projects, developed in partnership with Ducks Unlimited, include the addition of 23 shallow sculpted ponds, levees, swales, water control structures, and connecting ponds to the network of drainage ditches. These projects allow WDFW to manage wetland processes in a highly altered (diked and drained) system in an attempt to mimic seasonal freshwater wetland habitat while maintaining the ability to drain and plant waterfowl forage crops on a portion of the Unit.

    The ability to shallowly flood wetland plant communities combined with agricultural forage crops (Approximately 180 acres combined of corn, barley, fava beans) provide winter food resources that supports a wide variety of waterfowl and water birds that use these areas during migration and over the winter.

    Recreational activities include waterfowl hunting, wildlife viewing of waterfowl, shorebirds, birds of prey and other wildlife, a two-day youth-only waterfowl and pheasant hunt, and a five-day senior-only pheasant hunt.

    The Samish Unit is subject to the “15 shell daily limit” rule. According to WAC 232-16-770, “It is unlawful to have in possession more than 15 shotgun shells or to fire (shoot) more than 15 shells in one day” on this Unit. Hunters are not allowed to return to their vehicle for more shells after entering the field with their 15 shells.

    There are hunting and viewing blinds situated throughout the Samish Unit, most of which are on the sculpted ponds. For the purpose of waterfowl hunting, hunters are not required to hunt from a blind.

    Project partners and volunteers including Ducks Unlimited and the Washington Waterfowl Association (WWA) are working with WDFW to improve waterfowl habitat, use, and recreational access and opportunities on the site. WWA volunteers give back to the area by sponsoring an after hunting season site cleanup party, blind construction, and shell receptacle for disposal of spent shells.

    The site includes a parking area for about 30 vehicles and a short paved trail to the first pond.


    Viewing Opportunities

    Birds

  • Birds of Prey
  • Eagles
  • Shorebirds
  • Songbirds
  • Wading Birds
  • Waterfowl
  • Mammals

  • Small Mammals
  • Other

  • Butterflies
  • Reptiles/Amphibians
  • How to Get Here
    Access Site #1
    Driving Directions
    From Interstate 5, go west on Highway 20 to the Bayview-Edison Road. Turn right (north) and follow the Bayview-Edison Road through Bayview, past the state park and down onto the Samish Flats until the road ends at a "T" intersection. Turn left onto Samish Island Road and proceed until the 90-degree turn to the north. The parking area is straight ahead at the corner.
    Parking/Restroom Information
    Parking and restroom facilities are available.
    Other Information
    This Unit is closed during hours of darkness except during legal hunting seasons.
    Unique Features
    This is a popular waterfowl hunting and wildlife watching site planted with barley, corn, and fava bean to enhance food resources for wintering waterfowl. During the winter months evening waterfowl feeding flights can be quite impressive.

    The site is also popular for viewing raptors in the Samish Flats.

    Other Information
    A 15-shell restriction is in place on this Unit. Please refer to the waterfowl regulations for more information.
    During the early 1970s, the construction of State Highway 20, crossing the Swinomish Channel to Fidalgo Island, was built through a portion of Telegraph Slough. This created a shorter inter-tidal slough on the north side of the highway, and a freshwater wetland on the south side. DNR owns the 30-acre isolated wetland and a land use agreement with them allows WDFW to manage it for waterfowl hunting and wildlife observation. A parking area on the south side of Highway 20 provides access.
    Viewing Opportunities

    Birds

  • Birds of Prey
  • Eagles
  • Marine Birds
  • Shorebirds
  • Songbirds
  • Wading Birds
  • Waterfowl
  • Mammals

  • Small Mammals
  • How to Get Here
    Access Site #1
    Driving Directions
    From Interstate 5, go west on Highway 20 about six miles. Parking area is on the south side of the divided highway. West-bound traffic may make a U-turn onto east-bound lanes just before the Twin Bridges.
    Parking/Restroom Information
    Parking is available at this Unit. There are no restroom facilities.
    Leque Island, located west of Stanwood between Port Susan and Skagit bays, was once entirely salt marsh. Today it consists of wetlands and diked agricultural fields. WDFW began acquiring properties on Leque Island in 1974, and currently owns the entirety of the island aside from road right-of-ways controlled by Washington State Department of Transportation and Snohomish County. Contract farmers annually plant cereal grain as food for wintering waterfowl (mainly ducks and snow geese). This site offers bird watching, bird dog training, and pheasant and waterfowl hunting. The perimeter dikes on the island have repeatedly failed during high tide and storm events, most recently in 2010. Temporary repairs were made in 2010 to patch the dikes in two locations that were breached. WDFW and Ducks Unlimited are working cooperatively with grant funding to determine a long-term solution to the failing dikes. WDFW and Ducks Unlimited will draft potential design alternatives and WDFW will select the preferred alternative with input from stakeholders. This project is referred to as the Leque Island Alternatives Analysis and Design Project.
    Viewing Opportunities

    Birds

  • Birds of Prey
  • Eagles
  • Marine Birds
  • Shorebirds
  • Songbirds
  • Upland Birds
  • Wading Birds
  • Waterfowl
  • Mammals

  • Small Mammals
  • How to Get Here
    Access Site #1
    Driving Directions
    From Interstate 5, take exit 212 and proceed west toward Stanwood on Highway 532. Continue west through Stanwood onto the Camano Gateway Bridge. Half-way over the bridge you will notice Eide Road on your left. It is not longer legal to make a left turn on to Eide Road, however continue west and you will see the Davis Slough Access (Leque Island West Side) parking lot on the left. You may park here or if you wish to park on Eide Road. Turn around then take 532 east bound until you have reached Eide Road. If you miss the Davis Slough turn keep driving west onto Camano Island turn left onto N Smith Road and turn around then take 532 east to Eide Road. Continue to the small parking area at the end of Eide Road.
    Parking/Restroom Information
    There is a small parking area and no restroom facilities.
    Other Information
    This Unit is closed during hours of darkness.
    Unique Features
    This is a popular site for pheasant hunting and waterfowl hunting, as well as wildlife watching and dog training. Agricultural fields are planted in barley, winter wheat and/or corn for wintering food resources for waterfowl and snow geese.
    The Bald Eagle Natural Area encompasses 2,450 acres along the upper Skagit River at the confluence with the Sauk River, east of Concrete. The property was acquired beginning in 1975 to protect bald eagle wintering habitat. The unit consists of mature, undisturbed forested habitat. Bird watching is popular in the winter.
    Viewing Opportunities

    Birds

  • Birds of Prey
  • Eagles
  • Songbirds
  • Waterfowl
  • Mammals

  • Small Mammals
  • Other

  • Reptiles/Amphibians
  • Spawning Salmon
  • How to Get Here
    Access Site #1
    Driving Directions
    From Interstate 5, drive east on Highway 20 to Rockport. Turn right (south) on Highway 530 and across the Skagit River bridge. Turn left on the first road after the bridge, Martin Rd., and proceed until Martin Rd. makes a 90-degree turn to the right. The parking lot is directly ahead.
    Parking/Restroom Information
    Parking is available. There are no restroom facilities.
    Other Information
    This Unit is closed during hours of darkness.
    Unique Features
    This area offers viewing opportunities along the Skagit River for bald eagles and other wildlife. There is a short trail from the parking area to the edge of the river.
    The Cherry Valley unit encompasses 386 acres of forest and grassland in the Snoqualmie River floodplain, one mile north of Duvall. This unit consists of about 130 acres of deciduous and coniferous forest, 100 acres of wetlands and 30 acres of uplands. The unit also includes some farm fields, grass meadows, streams and hedgerows. The Cherry Valley unit is located on one of the lowest points in the Snoqualmie River valley, so flooding is common from mid-November to April. The department has implemented projects to restore salmon populations in the two creeks that flow through the unit.

    Recreation on this unit includes pheasant and waterfowl hunting, recreational dog training, and wildlife and bird viewing.

    WDFW purchased the unit property with grant funds from the National Park Service's Land and Water Conservation fund and bonds from the Washington State Recreation and Conservation Office (RCO).


    Viewing Opportunities

    Birds

  • Birds of Prey
  • Eagles
  • Songbirds
  • Upland Birds
  • Waterfowl
  • Mammals

  • Deer
  • Small Mammals
  • Other

  • Reptiles/Amphibians
  • How to Get Here
    Access Site #1
    Driving Directions
    Main parking lot is located approximately one mile north of Duvall on Highway 203, on the east side of the road.
    Parking/Restroom Information
    There is a large parking area along Hwy. 203. No restroom facilities are available.
    Other Information
    This Unit is closed during hours of darkness.
    Unique Features
    This is a popular Unit for pheasant and waterfowl hunting in the fall and winter, and dog training and trials in the spring and summer.
    The Corson Natural unit includes 160 acres of river bottomland just north of Lake Stevens in a rural residential area. It was last logged and cleared in the 1950s. The previous owner donated the property to WDFW in 1976 for wildlife habitat enhancement and non-hunting public use. The unit contains several large ponds and approximately seven acres of fields that provide forage for birds and waterfowl. Corson Natural unit also contains second growth forest with deciduous and coniferous trees. Catherine Creek cuts through the northeastern corner of the unit. In the last 15 years, volunteer groups have cleared the alder trees and brush and planted about eight acres of coniferous trees. There is no developed public access.
    Viewing Opportunities

    Birds

  • Birds of Prey
  • Eagles
  • Songbirds
  • Upland Birds
  • Waterfowl
  • Mammals

  • Deer
  • Small Mammals
  • Other

  • Reptiles/Amphibians
  • How to Get Here
    No information available.
    The Crescent Lake unit totals 360 acres of forest, sloughs and farm fields, located three miles south of Monroe. The property was purchased by WDFW in 1974 for waterfowl and pheasant hunting, wildlife conservation, and wildlife-related recreation. Crescent Lake is a 10-acre oxbow lake that was once part of the Skykomish River. Riley Slough runs through another former river channel and enters into the Snoqualmie River near the northwest corner. The unit also contains a 25-acre marsh and about 215 acres of deciduous woodland. About 100 acres are farmed through sharecrop agreements, which guarantee cereal grains are left standing for wintering waterfowl. There is a network of trails through the forest and fields to provide areas for hiking and nature observation. A 200-foot long footbridge built across the lake in 1978 completes the loop. There is a gravel parking area with reader boards at the north and south ends of the property.

    This property was purchased with grant funds from the National Park Service's Land and Water Conservation fund and bonds from the Washington State Recreation and Conservation Office (RCO).


    Viewing Opportunities

    Birds

  • Birds of Prey
  • Eagles
  • Songbirds
  • Upland Birds
  • Waterfowl
  • Mammals

  • Deer
  • Small Mammals
  • Other

  • Reptiles/Amphibians
  • How to Get Here
    Access Site #1
    Driving Directions
    From Highway 203, turn west on 203rd St. just south of Monroe. At the next stop sign at the "T" in the road, turn left or right for either the north or south parking lots.
    Parking/Restroom Information
    There is a north and south parking area at this Unit. No restroom facilities are available.
    Other Information
    This Unit is closed during hours of darkness.
    Unique Features
    This is a popular pheasant and waterfowl hunting site in the fall and winter. A large portion of the property is a big leaf maple forest that offers watchable wildlife opportunities.
    This unit is located south of the Highway 2 trestle between the Snohomish River and Ebey Slough. It is 1,237 acres in size and consists of approximately 417 acres of forested swamp, and 820 acres of grassland that was purchased in 2008 for hunting, wetland and wildlife protection, and wildlife-related recreation. The forested portion was logged in the 1890s and reforested naturally into one of the few remaining Sitka spruce swamps in the Snohomish River estuary. The unit contains a mix of farm fields, fallow grass lands, and Baltic rush, and is divided by the forks of Deadwater Slough, which spans the unit's length, north to south. There is also a network of ponds, drainage ditches, and sinkholes throughout the unit. Outdoor activities include pheasant and waterfowl hunting, wildlife viewing, and walking along the Ebey Slough dike road. Much of the unit is closed for waterfowl nesting and rearing habitat during the non-hunting season. Public access is very limited. There are no established walking trails or footbridges on the unit.
    Viewing Opportunities

    Birds

  • Birds of Prey
  • Eagles
  • Shorebirds
  • Songbirds
  • Wading Birds
  • Waterfowl
  • Mammals

  • Deer
  • Small Mammals
  • Other

  • Reptiles/Amphibians
  • How to Get Here
    Access Site #1
    Driving Directions
    From the Highway 2 trestle follow the Home Acres Road exit. Follow the frontage road to Ebey Slough for the main parking lot under the trestle. Follow Home Acres Road west to a seasonal parking area at 51st Ave. SE and one near 43rd Ave. SE. There are no restroom facilities available.
    Parking/Restroom Information
    There is no developed parking area or restroom facilities.
    Other Information
    This Unit is closed during hours of darkness.

    Spencer Island is located in the Snohomish River estuary just east of Everett. Through a joint acquisition and co-management agreement in 1989, WDFW owns 175 acres and Snohomish County Parks and Recreation Department owns 240 acres. The island is a flat, grassy wetland complex ringed by mixed forest that provides waterfowl and wildlife habitat. In 2005, the dike breached by an act of nature on the WDFW property on the northwest side of the island, restoring muted tidal influence to the area. Numerous community volunteer projects have helped maintain an elevated hiking trail that is approximately 1 mile long. This trail provides waterfowl hunting and wildlife viewing opportunities. Various salmon recovery groups are working together to continue restoration of this estuarine system. A potential opportunity for full restoration of tidal flow to 313 acres of Spencer Island is currently being considered through a partnership between the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and WDFW.  If funded, the project will fully restore estuarine processes and seasonal riverine flooding to the interior of the Island to enhance tidal marsh and improve habitat for juvenile salmon, while maintaining the public access trail (see link to the right for details). Parking and access to the area are through the City of Everett's water treatment plant on 4th Avenue just beyond Langus Riverfront Park.


    Viewing Opportunities

    Birds

  • Birds of Prey
  • Eagles
  • Marine Birds
  • Shorebirds
  • Wading Birds
  • Waterfowl
  • Mammals

  • Small Mammals
  • Other

  • Reptiles/Amphibians
  • How to Get Here
    Access Site #1
    Driving Directions
    Southbound I-5 from Marysville:
    Take exit 198 in Marysville and head south on Highway 529. Follow signs for Dagmar's Marina and turn onto Smith Island Road. Continue past Dagmar's Marina and turn right towards Langus Riverfront Park. Continue past the park and under Interstate 5 and past the sewage treatment center to the end of the road. Cross the bridge on foot to access Spencer Island.

    Northbound I-5 from Everett:
    Take exit 199 in Marysville. Get back on I-5 going south. Follow the above southbound directions.

    Parking/Restroom Information
    The parking area is about 1/4 mile back on the entrance road near the sewage treatment facility buildings. There is a honeybucket across the bridge to the left.
    Other Information
    This area is closed during hours of darkness.
    Unique Features
    This is an intertidal wetland popular with wildlife watchers and waterfowl hunters. The WDFW manages the north part of the island and Snohomish County manages the south. Hunting is allowed only on the north/WDFW portion of the island. To get to this area, cross the bridge and turn left. Continue for about 1/4 mile to large wood WDFW signs marking the beginning of WDFW ownership. Property line runs due east across the island; everything to the north is open to hunting.
    Other Information
    There is a 15-shell limit in place on this site. Please refer to waterfowl regulations for details. CAUTION: This Unit is intertidal- water levels are constantly changing. Know the tidal conditions before venturing off of the dike trail.
    This 456-acre unit is located three miles north of the town of Carnation. It was purchased in 1970 for hunting, wildlife conservation, and wildlife-related recreation. This unit contains a mix of active farm fields, forest habitats, wetland and stream drainages with hedgerows and fallow grassland meadows. Seasonal flooding is common and can inundate the entire unit. Stillwater has three small oxbow lakes – two that are connected to Harris Creek during high flow events and one that is a separate drainage. Harris Creek runs through the center of the property before emptying into the Snoqualmie River. This unit also has 8,500 feet of Snoqualmie River shoreline. Waterfowl and pheasant hunting are very popular activities as are wildlife viewing and hiking. King County Parks and Recreation Department owns and manages the Snoqualmie Valley Trail which skirts the unit’s eastern boundary. There are two parking areas a mile apart and adjacent to Highway 203 with informat ion boards.
    Viewing Opportunities

    Birds

  • Birds of Prey
  • Eagles
  • Songbirds
  • Upland Birds
  • Wading Birds
  • Waterfowl
  • Mammals

  • Deer
  • Elk
  • Small Mammals
  • Other

  • Butterflies
  • Reptiles/Amphibians
  • Wildflowers
  • How to Get Here
    Access Site #1
    Driving Directions
    This Unit is located on Highway 203 between Carnation and Duvall, on the west side of the highway. The north parking lot is across the highway from the Fay Road intersection. The south parking lot is just north of the Stillwater gas station on Highway 203.
    Parking/Restroom Information
    There are two parking areas. No restroom facilities are available.
    Other Information
    This area is closed during hours of darkness.
    Unique Features
    This is a popular pheasant hunting site with some waterfowl hunting opportunities in the fall and winter. Other popular activities include wildlife watching and hiking along the river.
    The Big Beef and Morgan Marsh units consist of multiple parcels totaling 962 acres in the Big Beef Creek watershed in Kitsap County. Morgan Marsh is located in the headwaters. The properties provide wetland and riparian preservation and salmon habitat protection.
    Viewing Opportunities
    How to Get Here
    Access Site #1
    Driving Directions
    Located in Kitsap County this Wildife Area Unit is spread out over several non-contiguous parcels.
    Parking/Restroom Information
    No Parking or restroom facilities
    Other Information
    No recreational opportunities
    Other Information
    There are currently no recreational opportunities on this property.
    The 124-acre Duckabush unit is located four miles south of Brinnon off Highway 101 in Jefferson County. The property provides protection of the Duckabush River estuary for both fish and wildlife benefits.
    Viewing Opportunities

    Birds

  • Birds of Prey
  • Eagles
  • Marine Birds
  • Shorebirds
  • Songbirds
  • Wading Birds
  • Waterfowl
  • Mammals

  • Deer
  • Small Mammals
  • Other

  • Reptiles/Amphibians
  • Spawning Salmon
  • How to Get Here
    Access Site #1
    Driving Directions
    From Brinnon, WA: 1. Go 2.7 Miles south on US Hwy 101. From Hoodsport, WA: 1. Go 22 Miles north on US Hwy 101.
    Parking/Restroom Information
    No facilities.
    Unique Features
    Tidal estuary.
    The Morgan Marsh unit lies about 4 miles east of the Bremerton city limits and encompasses 610 acres. It contains riparian, wetlands, open water, fields and second-growth evergreen forest.
    Viewing Opportunities

    Birds

  • Birds of Prey
  • Eagles
  • Songbirds
  • Upland Birds
  • Waterfowl
  • Mammals

  • Bear
  • Deer
  • Small Mammals
  • Other

  • Reptiles/Amphibians
  • How to Get Here
    Access Site #1
    Driving Directions
    From Bremerton, WA: 1: Start out going West on 6th ST toward Warren Ave/ WA-303, go 1.1 miles. 2. 6th ST becomes Kitsap Way/WA-310, go 1.6 miles. 3. Merge onto WA-3 N toward Silverdale / Hood Canal Bridge, go 4.9 miles. 4: Take the Newberry Hill Rd Exit, go 0.4 miles. 5. Turn Left onto NW Newberry Hill Rd, go 3.1 miles. 6: Turn Right onto Seabeck Hwy NW, go 5.0 miles. 7: Seabeck Hwy NW becomes NW Seabeck Holly Rd, go 5.0 miles. 8: Turn Slight left onto Hintzville Rd NW, go 0.9 miles. 9. Turn Left onto NW One Mile Rd, then immediately turn onto Lost Hwy W, go 1/2 Mile to Gate.
    Parking/Restroom Information
    Small road pull off next to gate. No restroom facilities.
    Unique Features
    Rough trail from gate to lake. Nice site for canoeing, kayaking or fishing.
    The Nisqually unit consists of multiple parcels totaling 648 acres about nine miles northeast of Olympia in Thurston County near the confluence of the Nisqually River and Puget Sound and adjacent to the Nisqually National Wildlife Refuge. The property was purchased for outdoor recreation, including public hunting and fishing, sightseeing, photography, nature study and boating. Habitat types include tidal flats, estuary, riparian, open fields and forest. Habitat suitable for waterfowl, raptors and migratory birds dominates the landscape.
    Viewing Opportunities

    Birds

  • Birds of Prey
  • Eagles
  • Marine Birds
  • Shorebirds
  • Songbirds
  • Wading Birds
  • Waterfowl
  • Mammals

  • Deer
  • Small Mammals
  • Other

  • Reptiles/Amphibians
  • How to Get Here
    Access Site #1
    Driving Directions
    From Southbound I-5: 1. Take Exit 114 onto Martin Way SE, go 0.8 miles. 2: Turn Right onto Meridian Rd NE. Pass through 1 roundabout, go 2.2 miles. 3. Turn Right onto 46th Ave NE, go 0.2 miles. 4. Turn Left onto D Milluhr Dr NE, go 0.4 miles. 5. End at the Nisqually Reach Nature Center, 4949 D Milluhr Dr NE Olympia, WA 98516 6. Use Boatlaunch, go East-SouthEast. From Nouthbound I-5: 1. Take Exit 111, turn right onto Marvin Rd NE, go 0.5 miles. 2. Turn Left onto Martin Way E, go 1 mile. 2: Turn Left onto Meridian Rd NE. Pass through 1 roundabout, go 2.2 miles. 3. Turn Right onto 46th Ave NE, go 0.2 miles. 4. Turn Left onto D Milluhr Dr NE, go 0.4 miles. 5. End at the Nisqually Reach Nature Center, 4949 D Milluhr Dr NE Olympia, WA 98516 6. Use Boatlaunch, go East-SouthEast.
    Parking/Restroom Information
    Parking Area and restroom facilities at Nature Center. Boat launch.
    Unique Features
    Nature Center, Boat launch, Viewing Dock.
    The 45-acre Skokomish unit is located in the Skokomish River floodplain north of Shelton in Mason County. The WDFW George Adams Fish Hatchery is situated on the property and covers several acres.
    Viewing Opportunities

    Birds

  • Birds of Prey
  • Eagles
  • Marine Birds
  • Shorebirds
  • Songbirds
  • Wading Birds
  • Waterfowl
  • Mammals

  • Deer
  • Small Mammals
  • Other

  • Reptiles/Amphibians
  • Spawning Salmon
  • How to Get Here
    Access Site #1
    Driving Directions
    1. Merge onto I-5 S toward Portland, go 0.9 miles. 2. Merge onto US-101 N via Exit 104 toward Aberdeen / Port Angeles, go 30 miles. 3. Turn Sharp Right onto Hwy 106, go 2 miles.
    Parking/Restroom Information
    No Parking or restroom facilities.
    The 104-acre Skokomish Delta unit is 20 miles north of Shelton at the great bend of Hood Canal in Mason County. The property consists of estuary islands at the mouth of the Skokomish River and provides waterfowl hunting access.
    Viewing Opportunities

    Birds

  • Birds of Prey
  • Eagles
  • Marine Birds
  • Shorebirds
  • Songbirds
  • Wading Birds
  • Waterfowl
  • Other

  • Reptiles/Amphibians
  • Spawning Salmon
  • How to Get Here
    Access Site #1
    Driving Directions
    1. I-5 take Exit 104. Merge onto US-101 N via Exit 104 toward Aberdeen / Port Angeles, go 30 miles. 3. Turn Sharp Right onto Hwy 106, go 2 miles.
    Parking/Restroom Information
    No Parking or restroom facilities.
    The 90-acre South Puget Sound Unit is located within the city limits of Lakewood in Pierce County.  The tract was acquired in the 1920s and was the site of the former South Tacoma Game Farm and South Tacoma Hatchery.  The game farm operation was discontinued in 1980s, but the hatchery still operates and is now the Lakewood Fish Hatchery.

    The property is one of the last remnants of south Sound prairie ecosystem that once stretch across thousands of acres in the region.  Although now surrounded by urban development, the property continues to support a variety of species that are adapted to open grassland habitats.

    Hunting Opportunities
    The entire South Puget Sound Unit is a designated Safety Zone. It is unlawful to hunt at this Unit.

    Pets
    Pets must be leashed and under owner's control (WAC 232-13-180; RCW 77-15-230).


    Viewing Opportunities

    Birds

  • Birds of Prey
  • Songbirds
  • Waterfowl
  • Mammals

  • Deer
  • Small Mammals
  • Other

  • Reptiles/Amphibians
  • How to Get Here
    Access Site #1
    Driving Directions
    From I-5 Southbound: 1. Take Exit 129 toward SO 72 St / SO 84 St, go 0.2 miles. 2. Take the SO. 74 St West ramp, go 0.2 miles. 3. Turn Slight Right onto 74th St W, go 2.3 miles. 4. 74th St W becomes Custer Rd W, go 1.2 miles. 5. Turn Right onto 88th St SW, go 0.3 miles. 6. Stay Straight to go onto Steilacoom Blvd SW, go 0.2 miles. 7. Turn Right onto Phillips Rd SW, go 0.6 miles. 8. End at 7801 Phillips Rd SW, Lakewood, WA 98498-6345 From I-5 Northbound: 1. Take the Bridgeport Way exit, Exit 125, toward McChord A.F.B., go 0.2 miles. 2. Turn Left onto Bridgeport Way SW, go 2.3 miles. 3. Turn Left onto Steilacoom Blvd SW, go 0.7 miles. 4. Turn Left to stay on Steilacoom Blvd SW, go 0.2 miles. 5. Turn Right onto Phillips Rd SW, go 0.6 miles. 6. End at 7801 Phillips Rd SW, Lakewood, WA 98498-6345
    Parking/Restroom Information
    Large Parking Area, no restroom facilities.
    Other Information
    Closed during hours of darkness.
    Unique Features
    Paved Handicapped accessible trail.
    The 452-acre Union River Unit, located in Mason County at the inland terminus of Hood Canal, is part of a larger complex of conservation and recreation lands that encompass Lynch Cove, the mouth of the Union River, and surrounding forested shorelines. The site is managed for multiple uses, including passive recreation, nature study, hunting, and habitat restoration. Local habitat and recreation management partners include the Hood Canal Salmon Enhancement Group (The Salmon Center) and the North Mason School District (Theler Community Center).

    Public Use Opportunities


    Viewing Opportunities

    Birds

  • Birds of Prey
  • Eagles
  • Marine Birds
  • Shorebirds
  • Songbirds
  • Wading Birds
  • Waterfowl
  • Mammals

  • Deer
  • Small Mammals
  • Other

  • Reptiles/Amphibians
  • How to Get Here
    Access Site #1
    Driving Directions
    The main vehicle entrance to the Union River Unit is shared with The Salmon Center at 600 NE Roessel Road in Belfair. The site can also be accessed by foot via the Theler Community Center trail system.
    Parking/Restroom Information
    The designated parking area and restroom are indicated on the informational kiosk.
    Other Information
    The site is open during daylight hours only.
    Access Site #2
    Driving Directions
    A small parking area with hand boat launch is located on SR 300 about 0.7 mile southwest of Belfair.
    Parking/Restroom Information
    Turn south into the parking area just east of NE Sand Hill Rd. No restroom is available at this site.
    Other Information
    Water access for WDFW-designated hunting blinds (Special Area Restriction, WAC 232-16-750).
    Unique Features
    Interpretive trail, bird watching, waterfowl hunting, and estuary restoration.
    Swanson Lakes Wildlife Area is approximately 21,000 acres, of which 1,280 acres are leased from DNR. Managed as one unit, Swanson Lakes is located in Lincoln County, about 10 miles south of the town of Creston, in the upper portion of the Crab Creek Watershed.

    It has numerous pothole lakes, a handful of rim rock lakes, and one intermittent stream, Lake Creek, a tributary of Rock Creek. Within the channeled scablands of the Columbia Plateau, it also includes plateaus, buttes, and channels. Shrub-steppe and riparian/wetlands are the main habitats. Much of the area is rangeland, with some old Conservation Reserve Program (CRP) fields and several hundred acres of restored grassland habitat. A small amount of leased cropland produces cereal grains and hay. Elevation ranges from about 1,640 feet in the southwest to about 2,490 feet in the northeast.

    Swanson Lakes was acquired mainly between 1993 and 1997 as a Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) wildlife mitigation project, primarily for Columbian sharp-tailed grouse, a state threatened species. It also supports a mix of species, including mule deer, upland game birds, raptors, songbirds, and several reptiles and amphibians.

    Red-tailed hawk Photo Gallery
    Wildlife Area staff have put together a great photo gallery. Take a look!
      Volunteer!
    Join in a citizen science initiative to conduct long-term Ecological Integrity Monitoring Learn More!

    Viewing Opportunities

    Birds

  • Birds of Prey
  • Shorebirds
  • Songbirds
  • Upland Birds
  • Wading Birds
  • Waterfowl
  • Mammals

  • Deer
  • Small Mammals
  • Other

  • Butterflies
  • Reptiles/Amphibians
  • Wildflowers
  • How to Get Here
    Access Site #1
    Driving Directions
    From US Hwy 2 at Creston, turn south by the grain elevators, onto Swanson Lakes Road; road name later changes to Seven Springs Road. At 10.5 miles, turn left at Y. Office is in one mile.
    Parking/Restroom Information
    On mile-long entry road to office, there is a parking area with vault toilet, kiosk with variety of maps and info, and wheelchair accessible short gravel trail toward the east Swanson Lake.
    Other Information
    No overnight parking on any WDFW lots. Parking at WLA HQ lot is recommended only during weekdays, as gate to HQ may be locked at random hours on weekends, giving possibility of trapping a vehicle behind locked gate.
    Access Site #2
    Driving Directions
    From I-90, turn north onto Hwy 21 toward Odessa. At approximately 30 miles, turn right onto Schuster Road. At 8 miles turn right onto Seven Springs Road/Swanson Lake Road. At 1.5 miles, turn left at Y in road. Office is 1 mile in.
    Parking/Restroom Information
    Several day parking lots are located along county roads that bisect or border the Wildlife Area. Parking is also allowed at WLA Headquarters. There is a restroom at WLA HQ, which is normally open M-F, 8-5. All parking lots require a Discover Pass or WDFW Vehicle Access Pass.
    Other Information
    No overnight parking on any WDFW lots. Parking at WLA HQ lot is recommended only during weekdays, as gate to HQ may be locked at random hours on weekends, giving possibility of trapping a vehicle behind locked gate.
    Unique Features
    This area is mostly shrub-steppe habitat, in the Channeled Scablands. Great for seeing spring wildflowers, a variety of birds of prey, and shrub-steppe obligate songbirds. There are some stands of aspen, and a few rimrock lakes, including a mile-long lake in the Lake Creek drainage. This formally unnamed lake is stocked with rainbow trout for walk-in fishing. There are several unmarked trails within the wildlife area. Almost no point within the WLA is further than 2 miles from a county road.
    Other Information
    Maps available at WLA HQ. No motorized vehicles allowed on SLWA, except on the mile-long entry road to HQ. Primary hunted species: mule deer, coyote, waterfowl and upland birds. Upland bird hunters note: take of sharp-tailed and sage grouse is prohibited by law. Spring through fall: hikers watch for rattlesnakes, and check for ticks after visiting.
    The Bridgeport Bar Unit, partially owned by the Douglas County PUD, covers about 450 acres along the Columbia River between Brewster and Bridgeport. Wetlands and ponds on the unit and Wells Pool provide habitat for waterfowl and other water birds. Bald eagles using Wells Pool and adjacent areas primarily feed on waterfowl and carrion during the winter and on fish the rest of the year. American white pelicans, long-billed curlews and Sandhill cranes visit this pool as well. Irrigated grain food plots grown annually for waterfowl forage also provide food and cover for a variety of other wildlife species. The Department of Fish and Wildlife has developed extensive riparian habitat on the unit providing dense cover for wildlife. This has benefited many wildlife species and has lead to a substantial increase in the California quail population. Ring-necked pheasants and grey partridge also occur on the area.
    Viewing Opportunities

    Birds

  • Birds of Prey
  • Eagles
  • Songbirds
  • Upland Birds
  • Waterfowl
  • Mammals

  • Deer
  • Small Mammals
  • Other

  • Butterflies
  • Reptiles/Amphibians
  • Wildflowers
  • How to Get Here
    Access Site #1
    Driving Directions
    From the town of Brewster, drive south on Bridge Street across the Columbia River. Turn left at “T” and proceed on Highway 173 about 1.5 miles. The unit begins at the first parking area and entrance sign to the left.
    Parking/Restroom Information
    Several parking areas without restroom facilities.
    Access Site #2
    Driving Directions
    From Bridgeport, proceed north on Highway 173 about 4 miles to the first parking area past the Wells WA entrance sign. It is located before and adjacent to a fire station.
    Unique Features
    This Unit is part of the Audubon Cascade Loop Birding trail and lies adjacent to the Columbia River (Wells Pool).
    Other Information
    Hunting: Non-toxic shot area.
    The Indian Dan Canyon Unit covers 4,412 acres northeast of Brewster. Shrubsteppe habitat occurs extensively on this unit, providing habitat for sharp-tailed grouse, white-tailed jackrabbit, sage and Brewer’s sparrows, mule deer, white-tailed deer and other wildlife. This habitat is suitable for sage grouse. The southern portion of the unit includes extensive stands of bitterbrush making it an important mule deer wintering site. Artificial ponds and Indian Dan Lake were developed using springs, seasonal streams, and seeps. Upland game birds occurring on the unit include California quail, grey partridge, blue grouse, ruffed grouse and Chukar. Sharp-tailed grouse are a protected species that can be found anywhere on the unit. Upland bird hunters are advised to be proficient at identifying these birds.
    Viewing Opportunities

    Birds

  • Birds of Prey
  • Eagles
  • Songbirds
  • Upland Birds
  • Waterfowl
  • Mammals

  • Bear
  • Deer
  • Small Mammals
  • Other

  • Butterflies
  • Reptiles/Amphibians
  • Wildflowers
  • How to Get Here
    Access Site #1
    Driving Directions
    From the south, ~4 miles east of Pateros on Highway 97 turn left on Indian Dan Road. Proceed ~1.25 mile to the south boundary of the unit. From the north, ~2 miles west of Brewster on Highway 97, turn right on Indian Dan Road. Proceed ~1.25 mile to the entrance sign.
    Parking/Restroom Information
    Two parking areas. No restroom facilities.
    Other Information
    Late winter/early spring activities in deer winter ranges are discouraged due to their impact on wintering deer.
    Unique Features
    The Unit includes a great diversity of habitat types and associated wildlife species. Indian Dan Lake, the riparian zone to the north, and surrounding shrubsteppe offer good wildlife watching opportunities.
    The Central Ferry Canyon Unit encompasses 1,908 acres of land located southwest of Brewster. Shrubsteppe habitat occurs extensively on this unit, providing habitat for sharp-tailed grouse, white-tailed jackrabbit, sage thrasher, sage and Brewer’s sparrows, mule deer and other wildlife. It also is suitable for sage grouse. Due to its northern aspect and elevation gain, the unit also supports a mixed forest habitat type including aspen, birch, Ponderosa pine and Douglas fir. The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife restored 300 acres of shrubsteppe habitat and planted thousands of trees and shrubs on the unit. Upland game birds occurring on the unit include ring-necked pheasant, California quail, grey partridge, blue grouse and Chukar. Sharp-tailed grouse are a protected species that can be found anywhere on the unit. Upland bird hunters are advised to be proficient at identifying these birds.
    Viewing Opportunities

    Birds

  • Birds of Prey
  • Eagles
  • Songbirds
  • Upland Birds
  • Mammals

  • Deer
  • Small Mammals
  • Other

  • Butterflies
  • Reptiles/Amphibians
  • Wildflowers
  • How to Get Here
    Access Site #1
    Driving Directions
    From Brewster, drive south on Bridge Street cross the Columbia River, turn right at "T" on Crane Rd., proceed ~3.25 miles west on Crane Rd. to Central Ferry Canyon Rd., proceed ~ 1.75 miles south to the north boundary of the unit
    Parking/Restroom Information
    Two major parking areas. Several pull offs. No restroom facilities.
    Unique Features
    The Unit includes a diversity of habitat types and associated wildlife species. Water birch and other woody species provide winter habitat for sharp-tailed grouse.
    The Okanogan Unit is partially owned by the Douglas County PUD and includes about 100 acres of shrubsteppe, wetland and riparian habitat. It is located about one mile north of the Columbia River. Its wetland and the adjacent Okanogan River provide habitat for waterfowl and other water birds. Upland game birds occurring on the unit include ring-necked pheasant, California quail and grey partridge.
    Viewing Opportunities

    Birds

  • Birds of Prey
  • Eagles
  • Songbirds
  • Upland Birds
  • Waterfowl
  • Mammals

  • Small Mammals
  • Other

  • Butterflies
  • Reptiles/Amphibians
  • Wildflowers
  • How to Get Here
    Access Site #1
    Driving Directions
    From Highway 97 at the Okanogan River Bridge located at the mouth of the Okanogan, turn north on the old Monse Road (East of the Okanogan River). Proceed about 1 mile. The Unit is located between the road and the Okanogan River.
    Parking/Restroom Information
    None.
    The Washburn Island unit includes about 250 acres of land. It is located on the Colville Indian Reservation adjacent to Wells Pool and is owned by the Douglas County PUD. The largest wetland system in the Wells Wildlife Area occurs here. This wetland and Washburn Pond was created by the construction of two causeways on the north and south ends of the island. Washburn Pond and Wells Pool provide habitat for waterfowl and other water birds. Bald eagles, American white pelicans, ospreys, long-billed curlews and Sandhill cranes visit this unit and adjacent pool. Grain food plots are grown annually for waterfowl forage. Upland game birds occurring on the unit include ring-necked pheasant, California quail and grey partridge.
    Viewing Opportunities

    Birds

  • Birds of Prey
  • Eagles
  • Shorebirds
  • Songbirds
  • Upland Birds
  • Waterfowl
  • Mammals

  • Deer
  • Small Mammals
  • Other

  • Butterflies
  • Reptiles/Amphibians
  • Wildflowers
  • How to Get Here
    Access Site #1
    Driving Directions
    From Highway 97, about 3 miles east of Brewster, proceed southeast on Highway 17 for about 1/4 mile. Take the first right and drive south about 1/2 mile.
    Parking/Restroom Information
    Limited parking. No room for trailers.
    Access Site #2
    Driving Directions
    From Highway 97 east of the Okanogan River Proceed south on Highway 17 about 1 mile. Turn south on dirt road at wide spot about 1/2 mile.
    Parking/Restroom Information
    Parking and restroom (pit toilet) available.
    The West Foster Creek unit’s 1,050 acres lie south of and adjacent to the Bridgeport Unit of the Sagebrush Flat Wildlife Area in Douglas County. Its shrubsteppe habitat supports sharp-tailed grouse, white-tailed jackrabbit, sage thrasher, sage and Brewer’s sparrows, mule deer and other wildlife species. Sage grouse have also been observed on the unit. Beaver activity has resulted in a network of ponds and channels, increasing wetland habitat in the northern portion of the unit. The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife restored 300 acres of shrubsteppe habitat, planted riparian habitat and constructed several ponds on the unit. Upland game birds occurring on the unit include ring-necked pheasant, California quail, grey partridge and Chukar. Sharp-tailed grouse are a protected species that can be found anywhere on the unit. Upland bird hunters are advised to be proficient at identifying these birds.
    Viewing Opportunities

    Birds

  • Birds of Prey
  • Eagles
  • Songbirds
  • Upland Birds
  • Mammals

  • Deer
  • Small Mammals
  • Other

  • Butterflies
  • Reptiles/Amphibians
  • Wildflowers
  • How to Get Here
    Access Site #1
    Driving Directions
    From Highway 17 about 1 mile south of Bridgeport, proceed south on Bridgeport Hill Road about 4 miles to the north boundary of the Unit.
    Parking/Restroom Information
    3 parking areas. No restroom facilities.
    Unique Features
    Meadow, riparian, wetland and shrubsteppe habitat on the unit support a great diversity of wildlife species. Water birch and other woody species provide winter habitat for sharp-tailed grouse.
    The British Petroleum Oil Company (BP, formerly Arco) unit is about 1,000 acres of privately owned industrial land four miles north of the Lake Terrell headquarters, leased by WDFW for public hunting, fishing and other wildlife recreation. A 20-acre winter grain farming agreement with BP supports wintering waterfowl and has created a high quality waterfowl hunting area. Two ponds and adjacent wetlands have been constructed with state duck stamp funds. The unit also has weekly pheasant releases for fall hunting.
    Viewing Opportunities

    Birds

  • Birds of Prey
  • Eagles
  • Songbirds
  • Upland Birds
  • Waterfowl
  • Mammals

  • Deer
  • How to Get Here
    Access Site #1
    Driving Directions
    I-5 Exit 262 (Ferndale), turn R (W). Go W on Main St (becomes Mtn. View). Go appx 6 miles, road will bend right (now called Rainbow Rd). At first stop sign turn right (Kickerville Rd.) Kickerville N to Grandview Rd. L on Grandview, and go appx 2 miles. Parking area on N side of road across from main BP entrance.
    Parking/Restroom Information
    Parking lot, no restroom facilities
    Unique Features
    Pheasant release site
    Other Information
    Maps for all hunting areas are posted at the HQ parking lot, and unit maps are up at Marine Drive, Slater Road, and Intalco parking lots.

    Shotgun Use Only, No Pistol or Rifle Shooting Allowed

    The Alcoa Intalco Works is 1,000 acres of industrial property, one mile south of the Lake Terrell headquarters, leased by WDFW for public hunting, fishing and other wildlife recreation. A walk-through archery range (two-mile loop through woods with 21 shooting stations) and several water impoundments and associated wetlands, have been constructed.
    Viewing Opportunities

    Birds

  • Birds of Prey
  • Eagles
  • Songbirds
  • Waterfowl
  • Mammals

  • Deer
  • Small Mammals
  • How to Get Here
    Access Site #1
    Driving Directions
    I-5 exit 260 (Lummi Isl/Slater Rd). W on Slater Rd 6 miles to flashing red light (Lake Terrell Rd). Turn R (N) on Lake Terrell Rd. Go through one stop sign (Unick Rd). Parking lot on L (W).
    Parking/Restroom Information
    Parking lot, portable toilet during summer/fall months only.
    Other Information
    Occasional archery tournaments (3 in summer) will close parking area for weekend.
    Unique Features
    Pheasant release site. 4 hunting/wildlife viewing blinds. Archery range open March 15 - August 31 ($2 use fee). Walk-in fishing only. Year-round off leash dog walking. Two miles of trails.
    Other Information
    Maps for all hunting areas are posted at the HQ parking lot, and unit maps are up at Marine Drive, Slater Road, and Intalco parking lots.
    The 1,500-acre Lake Terrell unit is ten miles northwest of Bellingham and five miles west of Ferndale. It includes Lake Terrell, a 500-acre man-made, shallow lake with two peat bog marshes on its south and southwest sides, and Terrell Creek.

    About 55 acres are farmed annually to produce winter food for waterfowl and upland game. Wild rice has been planted in the lakebed since 1988 and is producing seed annually. Several artificial islands, constructed to attract nesting waterfowl, have been used extensively by Canada geese. The adjacent fields are excellent brooding areas for goslings. Wintering trumpeter and tundra swans also use the lake as a night roost area. Pen-raised pheasants are released weekly in the fall for hunting. Duck blinds have been constructed on some of the artificial islands, and the lake has been developed with boat launches and other amenities.

    Although Terrell Creek was originally dammed to create an impoundment and restore wetland habitat for waterfowl, the resulting water body also supports introduced fish species. Lake Terrell, with its uniquely undeveloped shoreline and diverse fishery, has become one of the prime destination fishing venues in North Puget Sound. Anglers catch largemouth bass (which reproduce naturally in the lake), channel catfish, triploid rainbow trout, perch, sunfish and bullheads. Several major bass fishing tournaments are held on the lake annually.

    Viewing Opportunities

    Birds

  • Birds of Prey
  • Eagles
  • Songbirds
  • Waterfowl
  • Mammals

  • Deer
  • How to Get Here
    Access Site #1
    Driving Directions
    I-5 exit 260 (Lummi Isl/Slater Rd). W on Slater Rd 6 miles to flashing red light (Lake Terrell Rd). R (N) on Lake Terrell Rd appx 3 miles - road ends at the wildlife area headquarters.
    Parking/Restroom Information
    Parking lot and ADA accessible vault toilet.
    Other Information
    Fishing year-round, but no boat/ floating devices on lake during hunting season. Hunting on lake from blinds only.
    Unique Features
    24 hunting/wildlife viewing blinds. Boat dock and fishing pier. Boat fishing allowed Feb-Sept. Pheasant release site. Birding trails.
    Other Information
    Hunting OVER DECOYS from established pit blinds only. Dogs on leash April 1 - July 15. Dogs on leash after 4 pm Sept 15-Nov 30. Lake stocked annually with rainbow and cutthroat trout, and some triploid rainbows. Resident fish: bass, perch, catfish, bluegill, pumpkinseed.

    Maps for all hunting areas are posted at the HQ parking lot, and unit maps are up at Marine Drive, Slater Road, and Intalco parking lots.

    The 700-acre Lummi Island unit is seven miles southwest of Bellingham. It is located on the island’s steeper, rockier west side and was purchased to protect a peregrine falcon nesting site.
    Viewing Opportunities

    Birds

  • Birds of Prey
  • Eagles
  • Marine Birds
  • Songbirds
  • Mammals

  • Deer
  • Other

  • Reptiles/Amphibians
  • Wildflowers
  • How to Get Here
    Access Site #1
    Driving Directions
    Only accessible from the east by the Lummi Heritage Trust parking lot/trail.
    Other Information
    Maps for all hunting areas are posted at the HQ parking lot, and unit maps are up at Marine Drive, Slater Road, and Intalco parking lots.
    The 627-acre Nooksack unit extends from the Nooksack River estuary north to Slater Road, where it meets the Tennant Lake unit. It was purchased to protect critical salmonid and waterfowl habitat. Together with the Tennant Lake unit, it protects the eastern bank of the Nooksack River from its mouth to Ferndale, as well as most of Tennant and Silver creeks. A dike along the east bank currently protects previously farmed lowlands from flooding. The unit is being replanted with native riparian vegetation, and tidally influenced habitats are being restored for salmon and waterfowl. A dike-top trail runs along the Nooksack River. Approximately 100 acres of corn planted annually, with 10% of crop left standing in field over as winter waterfowl forage.
    Viewing Opportunities

    Birds

  • Birds of Prey
  • Eagles
  • Shorebirds
  • Songbirds
  • Wading Birds
  • Waterfowl
  • Mammals

  • Deer
  • Other

  • Reptiles/Amphibians
  • How to Get Here
    Access Site #1
    Driving Directions
    I-5 exit 260 (Lummi Isl/Slater Rd.). W on Slater Rd appx 3 miles. Parking area just E of Nooksack River bridge.
    Parking/Restroom Information
    Parking lot on S side of Slater Rd, no restroom facilities.
    Other Information
    Closed during hours of darkness
    Access Site #2
    Driving Directions
    I-5 exit 260 (Lummi Isl/Slater Rd.). W on Slater Rd appx 3.5 miles to Ferndale Rd. L (S) on Ferndale Rd to the intersection with Marine Dr. L (E) on Marine Dr appx 100 yds.
    Parking/Restroom Information
    Parking lot, no restroom facilities
    Other Information
    Closed during hours of darkness.
    Unique Features
    1.5 mile Nooksack River levee trail. Corn field - strips left for waterfowl. Seven hunting/wildlife viewing blinds. Swans often seen in winter. Birding/dog walking trails.
    Other Information
    Dogs on leash year-round and on the levee trail only. Hunting dogs in field only during hunting season.

    Maps for all hunting areas are posted at the HQ parking lot, and unit maps are up at Marine Drive, Slater Road, and Intalco parking lots.

    The 140-acre Pine Lake unit is several miles south of Bellingham on Chuckanut Mountain. A steep 2.5-mile trail leads to these two lowland mountain lakes, situated above 1,200 feet. The property is mostly wooded, with open water and wetlands at the lakes. WDFW stocks the lakes with 500-1,000 coastal cutthroat trout fry per lake every spring. The trail to the lakes is popular, and is hiked year round for fishing as well as for the views at the top. Rustic camping is allowed at both lakes, but no campfires are permitted. Horseback riding and bicycles are not allowed due to the wetland conditions at both lakes. The Whatcom County Parks Department maintains the parking area and toilet facility at the trailhead and the trail to the lakes. This trail connects with other hiking and mountain bike trails as part of the county’s Chuckanut Mountain trail system.
    Viewing Opportunities

    Birds

  • Songbirds
  • Waterfowl
  • Mammals

  • Deer
  • Other

  • Reptiles/Amphibians
  • How to Get Here
    Access Site #1
    Driving Directions
    I-5 exit 250 (Fairhaven Pkwy), W to 30th St. L (S) on 30th to Old Samish Rd. SE on Old Samish appx 1.5 miles. Parking for Pine/Cedar Lakes Trail on R.
    Parking/Restroom Information
    Parking lot and restroom facility
    Unique Features
    2 mi hiking trail. Lakes stocked with Rainbow and Cuthroat trout annually. Primitive camping available, but no fires.
    Other Information
    Cooperatively managed with Whatcom County. Dogs on leash year round. No horses on trail.

    Maps for all hunting areas are posted at the HQ parking lot, and unit maps are up at Marine Drive, Slater Road, and Intalco parking lots.

    The 360-acre Tennant Lake unit, about one mile southeast of Ferndale, is mostly in the floodplain of the Nooksack River. Some of the lower portions flood annually. Tennant Lake itself is an 80-acre, shallow, peat-bog lake. One half mile south of this lake is Claypit Pond, formed as clay was dug up to manufacture brick and glass (prior to WDFW ownership). Fairly extensive swamp/marsh areas occur adjacent to both lakes.

    Initially the area was primarily managed for waterfowl and deer hunting, and spiny-ray fishing. There is now also an interpretive center and scent garden for the blind, an observation tower, upland interpretive trail, an elevated wetland boardwalk trail, and a boat launch on the Nooksack River. These improvements, along with WDFW staff at the interpretive center, provide important recreational and educational opportunities for school districts and general visitors.

    TENNANT LAKE PARK
    Tennant Lake Fragrance Garden

    Tennant Lake Park - Interpretive Center and Fragrance Garden
    Mounted wildlife, displays and maps interpret the surrounding flora, fauna and natural process at work at Tennant Lake. Two “kid’s rooms” provide hands-on activities for children of all ages. An on-site naturalist is available to answer questions. The center is open year round, but hours vary according to season. The Tennant Lake Interpretive Center is operated under the joint management of the Washington State Department of Fish and Wildlife and the Whatcom County Parks and Recreation Department. Field trip opportunities and outreach programs are available.

    Contact the Center (360-384-3064) or visit the Whatcom Parks and Recreation Department website for complete information.
    Bird Watching Opportunites at Tennant Lake
     
    Friends of Tennant Lake and Hovander ParkYou Can Get Involved!
    The Friends of Tennant Lake and Hovander Park are local citizens and park lovers who work with Whatcom County Parks Department, the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, and the Whatcom Parks and Recreation Foundation to support staff and programs at Tennant Lake and Hovander Park in Ferndale, WA.

    Viewing Opportunities

    Birds

  • Birds of Prey
  • Eagles
  • Shorebirds
  • Songbirds
  • Wading Birds
  • Waterfowl
  • Mammals

  • Deer
  • Small Mammals
  • Other

  • Butterflies
  • Reptiles/Amphibians
  • How to Get Here
    Access Site #1
    Driving Directions
    I-5 exit 262 (Ferndale). R (W) on Main St. appx 1 mile. Get in L lane - take immediate L after you pass under railroad tressle (Hovander Rd). From Hovander Rd, turn R on Neilsen Rd. Go appx 1 mi - ends at Tennant Lake parking lot.
    Parking/Restroom Information
    Parking lot and ADA restroom facility
    Other Information
    Closed during hours of darkness. Boardwalk closed during hunting season.
    Unique Features
    Half-mile wetland boardwalk, viewing tower, scent garden for the blind, interpretive programs, birding/dog walking trails, interpretive displays, three hunting blinds and year-round off leash dog walking area on south end of unit.
    Other Information
    No dogs on boardwalk. See kiosk for other dog use information.

    Maps for all hunting areas are posted at the HQ parking lot, and unit maps are up at Marine Drive, Slater Road, and Intalco parking lots.

    The 54,070-acre L.T. Murray unit is about 15 miles west of Ellensburg. WDFW owns 39,305 acres, DNR owns 14,424 acres currently either leased to WDFW or under WDFW management and the U.S. Forest Service (USFS) owns 341 acres in the Taneum drainage. Lying in the rain shadow of the Cascade Mountains, the eastern end receives less than 16 inches of precipitation, but the westside gets up to 100 inches of snow. Elevations range from 2,000 to near 4,500 feet. The L.T. Murray extends in a band about 11 miles wide from south of Cle Elum to the top of Manastash Ridge. The lower portions of two major drainages, Taneum Canyon on the north and Manastash Canyon on the south, are within the unit. The streams in these canyons flow west to east and empty into the Yakima River. Numerous smaller perennial and intermittent stream channels feed these two major drainages. The timbered portions of the L.T. Murray form the upper watersheds that culminate in Taneum and Manastash Canyons, and the agricultural lands of the eastern Kittitas Valley.

    The L.T. Murray was purchased in 1968 to protect critical winter range for deer and elk, as well as perpetuate and improve upland game bird habitat. Funding for the purchase was an even split between federal dollars from the Bureau of Outdoor Recreation (BOR), and state dollars from the Interagency Committee for Outdoor Recreation (IAC).

    About 33,000 acres of the L.T. Murray are conifer forest, and the balance is predominantly shrub steppe, both interspersed with riparian corridors. Vegetation ranges from the lower elevation shrubs and bunch grasses into ponderosa pine, then to higher elevations with denser stands of timber, mostly Douglas fir, grand fir, and some western larch. Grasslands interspersed with rock outcrops and shrub-steppe communities dominate hillsides in transitional zones.

    Wildlife use is diverse, including elk, deer, bighorn sheep, sage grouse, turkey, quail, and a myriad of small mammals, neo-tropical/upland birds, raptors, and reptiles. There are numerous streams with resident trout. Some streams historically had anadromous stocks that are currently federally listed. WDFW and other state and federal agencies are actively pursuing the removal of barriers from these streams to re-establish anadromous fish use. Hunting, fishing, camping and wildlife watching are all popular.

    Viewing Opportunities

    Birds

  • Birds of Prey
  • Eagles
  • Songbirds
  • Upland Birds
  • Waterfowl
  • Mammals

  • Bear
  • Deer
  • Elk
  • Small Mammals
  • Other

  • Butterflies
  • Reptiles/Amphibians
  • Wildflowers
  • How to Get Here
    Access Site #1
    Driving Directions
    Watt Canyon: From I-90 Thorp Exit 101 to Joe Watt Canyon, Watt Canyon Road, and Hutchins Road: Travel approximately 0.75 mile South from Exit 101 on Thorp Highway to Thorp Cemetery Road and take a right onto it. Thorp Cemetery Road parallels I-90 like a siding road and heads NW. Follow it for approximately 3 miles, and go left onto Watt Canyon Road. Travel past the end of the pavement, across the canal, and up to the elk fence. Use the gate to the right (North), as the one by the barn and facility is locked for administrative use only. Please close the gate behind you. As you pass through the gate Hutchins Road is to the right, and Watt Canyon Road to the left. Please follow Green Dot Road Management regulations, and use a Green Dot map of the area for reference. This area is closed each winter for the protection of wintering elk. Closure begins approximately December 15, and reopens May 1. No campfires from April 15 to October 15.
    Parking/Restroom Information
    Large parking area at the gates. Plenty of room for horse trailers and buses to park and turn around. No restrooms.
    Other Information
    No campfires allowed from April 15 to October 15. Each winter the gates are locked and the area is closed to all public access for the protection of wintering elk. The closure begins upon initiation of supplemental feeding, typically in early to mid-December, and reopens May 1.
    Access Site #2
    Driving Directions
    From I-90 Ellensburg Exit 106 to Robinson Canyon: Travel Southwest on Thorp Highway across the Yakima River. This is on the South side of the freeway; watch for KOA campground on the Ellensburg side of the freeway, and WA State Patrol on the far side of the bridge. Follow Thorp Highway around the curve to the right as it heads out to the Northwest. Approximately 1.5 miles past the river watch for Robinson Canyon Road, and turn left onto it. Go approximately 3.75 miles to the end of pavement and County Road, and continue west to the gate in the elk fence. Please close the gate behind you. Please follow Green Dot Road Management regulations, and use a Green Dot map of the area for reference.
    Parking/Restroom Information
    Off-road parking and turn-around available inside the elk fence gate. No restrooms.
    Other Information
    No campfires allowed from April 15 to October 15. Each winter the gates are locked and the area is closed to all public access for the protection of wintering elk. The closure begins upon initiation of supplemental feeding, typically in early to mid-December, and reopens May 1.
    Unique Features
    Watt Canyon provides public viewing of elk feeding. Feeding occurs daily at ~8:00am from during the winter months (typically mid-December to mid-March).
    Other Information
    Wildlife Area is within a Green Dot Road Management area. Maps and regulations are available at the Regional Office, District Office and DNR's SE Regional Office. In addition, yellow readerboards with maps are placed at entry points. Motorized vehicles must stay on designated green dot roads.
    The 17,803-acre Quilomene unit and 28,549-acre Whiskey Dick unit, located about 15 miles northeast of Ellensburg, are now connected by WDFW’s recent acquisition of 5,441 acres of the Skookumchuck drainage. The contiguous total of 51,793 acres (of which WDFW owns 11,523 on Quilomene and 17,027 on Whiskey Dick, with the balance in DNR acres) is managed together. The first purchase was made in 1962 with state Interagency Committee for Outdoor Recreation funds to expand winter range for deer and elk herds and to perpetuate and improve upland game bird habitat.

    The units range in elevation from 550 feet above sea level at the Columbia River on the east, to 3,200 feet in the northwest corner (a distance of some 10 miles).

    The northernmost Quilomene unit is bordered on the north by the Colockum Wildlife Area. The Quilomene Creek basin lies in the dry, shrub-steppe habitat along the Columbia River northeast of Ellensburg. The similar Whiskey Dick Creek basin lies south of the Quilomene. Flows remain fairly constant due to the springs scattered throughout the drainage. Quilomene Creek, Whiskey Dick Creek, and some of their tributaries provide habitat for resident trout. Steelhead have been documented in Quilomene Creek.

    Vegetation is mostly shrub steppe, mostly sagebrush and bitterbrush mixed with bunchgrasses. Streams and springs provide narrow bands of riparian habitat. Wildlife use is diverse, including elk, deer, bighorn sheep, sage grouse, turkey, quail, and a myriad of small mammals, neo-tropical/upland birds, raptors, and reptiles. There are numerous streams with resident trout. Some streams historically had anadromous stocks that are currently federally listed. WDFW and other state and federal agencies are actively pursuing the removal of barriers from these streams to re-establish anadromous fish use. Hunting, fishing, camping and wildlife watching are all popular.

    Viewing Opportunities

    Birds

  • Birds of Prey
  • Eagles
  • Shorebirds
  • Songbirds
  • Upland Birds
  • Wading Birds
  • Waterfowl
  • Mammals

  • Bear
  • Bighorn sheep
  • Deer
  • Elk
  • Small Mammals
  • Other

  • Butterflies
  • Reptiles/Amphibians
  • Spawning Salmon
  • Wildflowers
  • How to Get Here
    Access Site #1
    Driving Directions
    Parke Creek and Quilomene: Take Vantage Hwy east from Ellensburg. Just past Milepost 10 take a left on Parke Creek Road. Travel approx. 3 miles to the junction of Parke Creek and Little Parke Creek roads. Stay north to travel up Little Parke, or turn east to follow Parke Creek. Private inholding occur along Parke Creek road for the next 1.5 miles. Continue another 2.8 miles and turn right to access the Quilomene Wildlife Area.
    Parking/Restroom Information
    No developed parking areas; Parking along the roadside is acceptable on state ownership, but not on private lands. No restrooms.
    Other Information
    This road system is not yet marked for Green Dot Road Management, but no off-road motorized travel is permitted.
    Access Site #2
    Driving Directions
    Quilomene and Skookumchuck: Take Vantage Hwy east from Ellensburg. Approximately 0.5 mile east Milepost 16 is the Beacon Ridge Road turnoff at the Wild Horse Wind Project. Access is limited/restricted through the wind project. Drive through access is permitted April 1 to December 1, from Dawn to Dusk. Follow the Beacon Ridge road to the Quilomene Ridge road, then follow the green dot road map to access the wildlife area.
    Parking/Restroom Information
    No developed parking areas; Parking along the roadside is acceptable on state ownership. No parking on the Wild Horse Wind Project without a permit. No restrooms on state ownership.
    Other Information
    The area south of the Quilomene Ridge road, east of the wind project, north of the Vantage Hwy and west of the Columbia River is closed to motorized vehicles from February 15 to May 1 to protect wintering elk. The Beacon Ridge road through the Wild Horse Wind Project is closed to public access from December 1 to April 1.
    Unique Features
    Audobon Important Bird area.
    Other Information
    The Quilomene and Whiskey Dick Wildlife Areas are within a Green Dot Road Management area. Maps and regulations are available at the Regional Office, District Office and DNR's SE Regional Office. In addition, yellow readerboards with maps are placed at entry points. Motorized vehicles must stay on designated green dot roads.
    The 17,803-acre Quilomene unit and 28,549-acre Whiskey Dick unit, located about 15 miles northeast of Ellensburg, are now connected by WDFW’s recent acquisition of 5,441 acres of the Skookumchuck drainage. The contiguous total of 51,793 acres (of which WDFW owns 11,523 on Quilomene and 17,027 on Whiskey Dick, with the balance in DNR acres) is managed together. The first purchase was made in 1962 with state Interagency Committee for Outdoor Recreation funds to expand winter range for deer and elk herds and to perpetuate and improve upland game bird habitat.

    The units range in elevation from 550 feet above sea level at the Columbia River on the east, to 3,200 feet in the northwest corner (a distance of some 10 miles).

    The northernmost Quilomene unit is bordered on the north by the Colockum Wildlife Area. The Quilomene Creek basin lies in the dry, shrub-steppe habitat along the Columbia River northeast of Ellensburg. The similar Whiskey Dick Creek basin lies south of the Quilomene. Flows remain fairly constant due to the springs scattered throughout the drainage. Quilomene Creek, Whiskey Dick Creek, and some of their tributaries provide habitat for resident trout. Steelhead have been documented in Quilomene Creek.

    Vegetation is mostly shrub steppe, mostly sagebrush and bitterbrush mixed with bunchgrasses. Streams and springs provide narrow bands of riparian habitat. Wildlife use is diverse, including elk, deer, bighorn sheep, sage grouse, turkey, quail, and a myriad of small mammals, neo-tropical/upland birds, raptors, and reptiles. There are numerous streams with resident trout. Some streams historically had anadromous stocks that are currently federally listed. WDFW and other state and federal agencies are actively pursuing the removal of barriers from these streams to re-establish anadromous fish use. Hunting, fishing, camping and wildlife watching are all popular.

    Viewing Opportunities

    Birds

  • Birds of Prey
  • Eagles
  • Shorebirds
  • Songbirds
  • Upland Birds
  • Wading Birds
  • Waterfowl
  • Mammals

  • Bear
  • Bighorn sheep
  • Deer
  • Elk
  • Small Mammals
  • Other

  • Butterflies
  • Reptiles/Amphibians
  • Spawning Salmon
  • Wildflowers
  • How to Get Here
    Access Site #1
    Driving Directions
    Whiskey Dick Road: Take Vantage Hwy east from Ellensburg or west from Vantage to ~milepost 18. Look for the old wooden corrals on the north side of the road and the big yellow readerboard.
    Parking/Restroom Information
    Parking area at the junction of the Whiskey Dick road and Vantage Hwy. No restrooms.
    Other Information
    No campfires allowed from April 15 to October 15. A motorized closure is in effect from February 1 through April 30 to protect wintering elk. The closure extends from the Vantage Hwy north up to the Quilomene Ridge Road (Ridge road is open to motorized vehicles), west to the Wild Horse Wind Project and east to the Columbia River.
    Access Site #2
    Driving Directions
    Pumphouse Road: Take Vantage Hwy east from Ellensburg or west from Vantage to ~milepost 20. Look for the big yellow readerboard and the cattleguard at the beginning of the road.
    Parking/Restroom Information
    Small parking area at junction of Pumphouse road and Vantage Hwy. No restrooms.
    Other Information
    No campfires allowed from April 15 to October 15. A motorized closure is in effect from February 1 through April 30 to protect wintering elk. The closure extends from the Vantage Hwy north up to the Quilomene Ridge Road (Ridge road is open to motorized vehicles), west to the Wild Horse Wind Project and east to the Columbia River.
    Unique Features
    Audobon Important Bird Area.
    Other Information
    The Wildlife Area is within a Green Dot Road Management area. Maps and regulations are available at the Regional Office, District Office and DNR's SE Regional Office. In addition, yellow readerboards with maps are placed at entry points. Motorized vehicles must stay on designated green dot roads.

    The 48,990-acre Oak Creek Unit is located west of Naches and is bisected by the Naches and Tieton Rivers. This is a popular area for hunting deer, elk, and upland game birds, as well as camping, rafting and rock climbing along the Tieton River. Hiking trails provide access to spectacular displays of spring wildflowers and bird watching opportunities, especially the Tieton River Nature Trail. Tim’s Pond along Hwy 12 is stocked with trout several times a year, making it a popular family fishing spot.

    A winter elk feeding program is conducted annually to help reduce conflict between elk and neighboring agricultural land. California bighorn sheep are also fed during the winter on Cleman Mountain. These feed sites provide an excellent opportunity observe elk and sheep up close. Bald eagles and golden eagles are also abundant in winter.

    A visitor’s center is staffed by volunteers during the winter and contains information on the wildlife area and the various wildlife species on display. 

    The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) recently acquired of 10,000 acres of Plum Creek Timber Company land in the Oak Creek watershed, which includes eight miles of riparian habitat along the Tieton River. It also features uplands abounding with intact shrub steppe habitat, oak woodlands, ponderosa pine and Douglas fir forests, cliffs and talus slopes. This new property is in mixed ownership with the U.S. Forest Service.

    In 2012, WDFW transferred 7,040 acres to DNR in the Bethel Ridge, Rattlesnake Creek area, removing this area from WDFW management.  In 2014, WDFW acquired 2,900 acres of shrub steppe and pine forest habitat adjacent to the Oak Creek Unit.

    Oak Creek Unit Road and Motorized Trail Map
    Best printed at 11x17 or larger

    Viewing Opportunities

    Birds

  • Birds of Prey
  • Eagles
  • Songbirds
  • Upland Birds
  • Waterfowl
  • Mammals

  • Bear
  • Bighorn sheep
  • Deer
  • Elk
  • Small Mammals
  • Other

  • Butterflies
  • Reptiles/Amphibians
  • Wildflowers
  • How to Get Here
    Access Site #1
    Driving Directions
    Visitor's Center/Headquaters:
    From I-5 south of Olympia go east on Hwy 12. HQ entrance is 10 mi. east of Rimrock Retreat on left (north) side. From I-82 at Yakima, west on Hwy 12 through Naches. Four miles west of Naches, turn left at Junction to White Pass. Proceed 2 mi. to HQ entrance on right (north) side.
    Parking/Restroom Information
    Viewing sites require a Discover Pass or WDFW Vehicle Access Pass to park.

    Very large gravel parking area and covered ADA accessible viewing platform, with three vault toilets open year-round. Visitor Center open 9 a.m.-4 p.m. daily during winter months (when elk feeding is underway) and staffed with Wildlife Education Corps volunteers

    Other Information
    Large portion of upland range above HQ feedsite is closed March and April to all public entry to protect big game during winter recovery period.
    Access Site #2
    Driving Directions
    Cleman Mountain big horn sheep feed site:
    From I-5 south of Olympia go east on Hwy 12. HQ entrance is 10 miies east of Rimrock Retreat on left (north) side. From I-82 at Yakima, west on Hwy 12 through Naches. Four mi. west of Naches, turn right at Junction of Hwy 12 and 410 on Old Naches Rd. Follow Old Naches Rd for ½ mile to parking lot on left.
    Parking/Restroom Information
    Viewing sites require a Discover Pass or WDFW Vehicle Access Pass to park. .
    Unique Features
    The area is a popular big-game hunting area for deer, elk, bear, and big horn sheep (permit only) during fall seasons. It is also a popular rock-climbing destination, with multiple routes along the Tieton River cliffs. White-water rafting is big on the Tieton River during September.
    Other Information

    Viewing sites require a Discover Pass or WDFW Vehicle Access Pass to park.   During winter feeding guided truck tours of the feed site are conducted daily.  Reservations are recommended and must be made at least 24 hours in advance; remaining seats are filled on a first come first served basis.  Call the Oak Creek Wildlife Area for more information.  Tours are approximately 30 minutes and provide photo opportunities and information on the wildlife area and elk.  Be sure to dress appropriately.  Donations are suggested and support the winter feeding program. 

    The Oak Creek Unit is under a green dot travel management system.  Roads open to motor vehicles are marked with a white carsonite post with a green dot.  Roads that are unmarked are closed to motor vehicles.  Maps are available at the Oak Creek Headquarters and the Region 3 Office in Yakima.

    Seasonal Closure Information
    Annually from the start of winter feeding until May 1 at 6 a.m. large portions of upland range is closed to all public entry to protect big game during winter recovery period.  The boundary of the closure is clearly posted and marked on green dot maps available at the Oak Creek Headquarters and the Region 3 office in Yakima.

    Annually from December 30 until May 1 at 6 a.m. the Cleman Mountain/Sanford Pasture area is closed to motor vehicles to protect wintering wildlife.  This area is open to walk in access.

    The Cowiche unit covers 7,683 acres south of Tieton and west of Yakima. In 2010, the unit expanded with the acquisition of the Worrell Ranch on the south side of Cowiche Mountain, adding 2,340 acres of shrub steppe habitat. The South Fork Cowiche Creek, which hosts spawning steelhead now that downstream barriers have been removed, flows for more than three miles through the unit.

    The Cowiche Unit is an excellent example of intact shrub steppe plant community attracting a variety of shrub steppe obligate birds. Bird watchers and nature lovers can see many bird species and beautiful spring wildflowers throughout the area. Elk and mule deer can be found year round, with hunting opportunities available in fall.

    A segment of the William O. Douglas trail runs through the Cowiche Unit, offering great views of shrub steppe habitat and the Yakima Valley below. The five-mile Box Spring Canyon Trail departs from Access Site #1 and follows the elk fence along Sunset Way. At the first corner, hikers can use the gate in the elk fence to access an old road and pick up the trail that runs beside it. 

    One elk winter feed site is located on the unit, but there is no public access to view the elk in the winter.

    Cowiche Unit Road and Motorized Trail Map
    Best printed at 11x17 or larger

    Viewing Opportunities

    Birds

  • Birds of Prey
  • Songbirds
  • Upland Birds
  • Mammals

  • Deer
  • Elk
  • Small Mammals
  • Other

  • Butterflies
  • Wildflowers
  • How to Get Here
    Access Site #1
    Driving Directions
    From Hwy 12 at Yakima, exit on 40th Ave. Go south on 40th for 5 lights to Summitview Ave. Go west (right) on Summitview approximately 8.5 miles. Left on Cowiche Mill Road for 3 miles to the elk fence and gravel road. Go approximately 300 yds. to the small parking area on left side.
    Parking/Restroom Information
    No facilities.
    Other Information
    No motor vehicle access. Walk-in and horseback access only.

    Seasonal Closure Information
    The unit is closed to public entry south of Cowiche Mill Road from the start of winter feeding until May 1 at 6 a.m. to protect elk from human disturbance. The boundary of the closure is clearly posted and marked on green dot maps available at the Oak Creek Headquarters and the Region 3 office in Yakima.

    Unique Features
    Excellent wildflower displays in spring. Pristine shrub-steppe habitat. Viewing of numerous sage-obligate wildlife species possible after April.

    Viewing Opportunities

    Birds

  • Birds of Prey
  • Eagles
  • Songbirds
  • Upland Birds
  • Waterfowl
  • Mammals

  • Bear
  • Deer
  • Elk
  • Moose
  • Mountain Goats
  • Small Mammals
  • Other

  • Butterflies
  • Reptiles/Amphibians
  • Wildflowers
  • How to Get Here
    Access Site #1
    Driving Directions
    From Newport, travel northwest on Le Clerk Creek Road for approximately 25 miles. The Wildlife Area is in four sections on the east side of the Pend Oreille River. See map for details.
    Parking/Restroom Information
    No designated parking areas, no restrooms.
    Other Information
    Area may not be accessible during winter, due to snow.
    Unique Features
    Elk feeding station. Grizzy bear recovery area.
    The Texas Creek unit is 1,371 acres about three miles south of Carlton. It includes four parcels surrounded by DNR land to the east of the Methow River. Elevation ranges from 1,390 feet on the Methow River to 2,950 feet on the east boundary. It was purchased for mule deer winter range, with salmonid habitat on the mile of Methow riverfront included. The area is primarily west and south facing slopes dominated by bitterbrush, sage and bunchgrasses, considered important shrub steppe habitat for a variety of songbirds, herptiles, wintering bald eagles, and other wildlife species.
    Viewing Opportunities

    Birds

  • Birds of Prey
  • Eagles
  • Songbirds
  • Upland Birds
  • Wading Birds
  • Waterfowl
  • Mammals

  • Bear
  • Deer
  • Small Mammals
  • Other

  • Butterflies
  • Reptiles/Amphibians
  • Spawning Salmon
  • Wildflowers
  • How to Get Here
    Access Site #1
    Driving Directions
    Off Hwy 153, turn north onto Stokes Road, 5 miles south of Carlton.
    Parking/Restroom Information
    Park at kiosk sign at end of road. No restrooms
    Other Information
    no access in winter. Road is not plowed past private property boundary.
    Access Site #2
    Driving Directions
    In Carlton, drive east on Texas Creek Road for 3 miles.
    Parking/Restroom Information
    Park on Texas Creek Road. No drive-in access. No restrooms.
    The Rendezvous is 4,225 acres north of Winthrop, between the Chewuch and Methow rivers. All of the area is surrounded by private land. Elevations range from 1,800 to 3,500 feet. It was purchased for mule deer winter range and migratory corridors, and also serves as a staging area during early spring green up. South facing slopes are primarily sagebrush, bitterbrush and bunch grasses. North slopes are timbered with Douglas fir and Ponderosa pine. Cub Creek, Little Cub Creek and the Riser Lake area have aspen and shrub dominated riparian areas, which are important mule deer fawning areas and nesting habitat for cavity nesters and migratory songbirds.
    Viewing Opportunities

    Birds

  • Birds of Prey
  • Eagles
  • Songbirds
  • Upland Birds
  • Wading Birds
  • Waterfowl
  • Mammals

  • Bear
  • Deer
  • Small Mammals
  • Other

  • Butterflies
  • Reptiles/Amphibians
  • Spawning Salmon
  • Wildflowers
  • How to Get Here
    Access Site #1
    Driving Directions
    From Winthrop, follow `the West Chewuch Road 1.5 miles. Turn left on Rendezvous Road. Left on Gunn Ranch Road.
    Parking/Restroom Information
    1 mile west on Gunn Ranch Road is an ADA parking facility and restrooms.
    Other Information
    No camping in parking area. Walk in access to Wildlife Area only.
    Access Site #2
    Driving Directions
    From Winthrop, follow the West Chewuch Road and turn left onto Cub Creek Road. Follow 1 mile.
    Parking/Restroom Information
    Parking on Cub Creek Road or at the Cub Creek River crossing. No restrooms.
    Other Information
    Walk in access only.
    Unique Features
    Unmaintained trails and old roads to Lewis Butte, Riser Lake, and Little Cub Creek areas. Excellent wildflower blooms in the spring (mid-May). Mule deer migratory range.
    Other Information
    Motorized vehicles are NOT permitted on the Methow Wildlife Area.
    The Methow unit is the largest and oldest, with 14,800 acres located in the foothills on the east side of the Methow Valley. It is a long narrow strip of land varying in width from a half mile to two miles, stretching from Falls Creek on the north end to Frazer Creek and Highway 20 on the south end -- a distance of about 18 miles. The area is bordered on the east and north by Okanogan and Wenatchee National Forest, and on the west and south by private land. Elevations vary from 2,100 feet in the Frazer Creek area to just under 4,000 feet at a point north of Campbell Lake. Purchased primarily for mule deer winter range, habitats and vegetation vary from timber (Ponderosa pine, Douglas fir) on north facing sites, to shrub-steppe (bitterbrush, sagebrush, and bunch grasses) on south and west facing slopes. Aspen, cottonwood, and a variety of shrub and forb species dominate along most stream courses. This is critical habitat for songbirds, cavity nesters, amphibians and reptiles, small mammals, nesting golden eagles, and three species of forest grouse.
    Viewing Opportunities

    Birds

  • Birds of Prey
  • Eagles
  • Songbirds
  • Mammals

  • Bear
  • Deer
  • Small Mammals
  • Other

  • Butterflies
  • Reptiles/Amphibians
  • How to Get Here
    Access Site #1
    Driving Directions
    From Winthrop, take East Chewuch Road 2 miles; turn right on Bear Creek Loop Road- Pearrygin Lake State Park turnoff. Follow 3.5 miles to WDFW Methow Wildlife Area Headquarters.
    Parking/Restroom Information
    Parking in vicinity on county and USFS road systems. ADA restroom facilities at Bear Creek Campground, Beaver Creek Campground, and Ramsey Creek Campground.

    See listing of Methow Access Sites and Facility Information

    Other Information
    USFS roads not open during winter months. Lester Road not plowed during winter.
    Access Site #2
    Driving Directions
    From Twisp, take highway 20 towards Okanogan, and turn left on Beaver Creek Road. Follow Beaver Creek Road approx 3 miles to Balky Hill Road and turn left. Drive 1/2 mile and WDFW land on the right. Follow Beaver Creek Road approx 6 miles, to Lester Road, turn left. Follow Lester Road for 7 miles to Bear Creek Road (see Site Information #1). To Fraser Creek Area: Approximately 1 mile east of Beaver Creek Road on Hwy 20 is a parking access to the Fraser Creek area of the Methow Unit.
    Parking/Restroom Information
    Parking in vicinity on county and USFS road systems. ADA restroom facilities at Bear Creek Campground, Beaver Creek Campground, and Ramsey Creek Campground.

    See listing of Methow Access Sites and Facility Information

    Other Information
    USFS roads not open during winter months. Lester Road not plowed during winter.
    Unique Features
    Kiosk signs at main entrance areas with maps and shrub-steppe habitat information.
    Other Information
    Motorized vehicles are NOT permitted on the Methow Wildlife Area.

    Public conduct rules for WDFW Lands restrict the discharge of firearms within 500 feet of any of the 7 designated campgrounds for the Methow Unit. See locations for all 21 WDFW designated campgrounds here.

    The Early Winters unit is 650 acres northwest of Winthrop along Highway 20. WDFW owns 85 acres of the unit and holds conservation easements on the remaining privately-owned 565 acres. The Methow River runs along the east boundary. Major habitat types include riparian, mixed forest and agricultural lands. Early Winters is a popular destination for hiking and cross-country skiing.
    Viewing Opportunities

    Birds

  • Birds of Prey
  • Eagles
  • Songbirds
  • Mammals

  • Bear
  • Deer
  • Small Mammals
  • Other

  • Butterflies
  • Reptiles/Amphibians
  • Spawning Salmon
  • Wildflowers
  • How to Get Here
    Access Site #1
    Driving Directions
    Winter Access only due to surrounding private property. Follow Highway 20, 1 mile north of Mazama.
    Parking/Restroom Information
    Parking at Arrowleaf Trailhead on Highway 20. No restrooms.
    Other Information
    Winter Access only via community ski trail system.
    Other Information
    Arrowleaf ski trail system is maintained by Methow Valley Sports Trail Association.
    The Soda Springs unit consists of about 13,000 acres in mostly contiguous parcels. About 2,100 acres are managed jointly between WDFW and the Bureau of Land Management (BLM). This unit is managed to preserve and enhance habitat for game species, primarily black-tailed deer and wild turkeys. Western gray squirrels, which are a threatened species in the state, also can be found on this unit. Hunting, camping, hiking and wildlife watching are popular activities.
    Viewing Opportunities

    Birds

  • Birds of Prey
  • Eagles
  • Songbirds
  • Upland Birds
  • Waterfowl
  • Mammals

  • Bear
  • Deer
  • Elk
  • Small Mammals
  • Other

  • Wildflowers
  • How to Get Here
    Access Site #1
    Driving Directions
    From Goldendale, drive 9.5 mi. west on State Highway 142 to intersection with the Glenwood Highway. Turn NW on the Glenwood Highway and drive 4 mi. to intersection with Soda Springs Road. Turn west on Soda Springs Rd. to access the main system of roads on this unit. The first .25 mi. of road crosses private land; WDFW land lies beyond that. Be aware of boundaries of private land inholdings farther in on Soda Springs Rd.
    Parking/Restroom Information
    Parking is to occur along the roads and in areas used for camping. There are no restroom facilities in this area.
    Other Information
    Overnight camping is permitted. Campfires are permitted except during the seasonal burn ban, which usually is from June 1 to October 30. Seasonal road closures on three roads are in place from November 1 to April 14; during that time, the areas behind the gates are open to nonmotorized access only.
    Access Site #2
    Driving Directions
    From Goldendale, drive 9.5 mi. west on State Highway 142 to intersection with the Glenwood Highway. Turn NW on the Glenwood Highway and drive about 5.3 mi. to intersection with Grayback Road (unmarked - to the right). A more primitive road, the North Breaks Road, intersects the Glenwood Highway to the left. Both roads go onto state land adjacent to the highway.
    Parking/Restroom Information
    Parking is to occur along the roads and in camping areas. There are no restroom facilities in this area.
    Other Information
    Overnight camping is permitted. Campfires are permitted except during the seasonal burn ban, which usually is June 1 to October 30.
    Unique Features
    Groves of large oak trees are present along Sheep Canyon Rd. and along the Glenwood Highway near Stinson Flat Campground.
    Other Information
    Hunting Information:
    Deer hunting and turkey hunting are two of the most popular uses of this unit, along with fishing on the Klickitat River. All of this unit is open to hunting with the exception of areas posted as Safety Zones. Safety Zones are posted around wildife area buildings and neighboring residences. Visitors should be aware that various hunting seasons occur between Sept. 1 and Dec. 15. Also, spring turkey hunting season runs from mid-April to the end of May. Anticipate hunting activity on this unit and employ appropriate safety precautions.

    Boating & Restrooms:
    Boat ramps and restroom facilities are located at the Leidl Park and Stinson Flat Campgrounds.

    Camping:
    Camping in upland areas is permitted, provided that visitors use established camping sites. Contact the wildlife area headquarters at 509-773-4459 for more information on upland camping spots. Visitors to all camping areas are required to pick up after themselves; no garbage collection facilities are available.

    Wildlife Viewing:
    Wildlife may be viewed from roads or during cross-country walks. There is no designated wildlife feeding area.

    Hiking:
    There are no developed hiking trails, however the open nature of the country is conducive to dispersed hiking. Wildlife area service roads, which are closed to motorized travel by the public, are available for hiking.

    Nordic Skiing and Snowshoeing:
    Snowfall depth varies from year to year. The time most suitable for Nordic skiing and snowshoeing is January. Adequate snow depth is less dependable in December and February.

    Horseback Riding:
    Horseback riding is permitted on this unit between May 1 and December 15. Riders are encouraged to stay on roads. (Horses are allowed on roads that are closed to motorized access.) Most of the watering sites are seasonally available. After June 1, many become dry.

    Goldendale Hatchery Unit is located along Spring Creek adjacent to WDFW’s Goldendale Fish Hatchery. The 240-acre unit historically was a farm and its agricultural fields are now being cultivated under a sharecrop agreement. A portion of the wheat produced is left in the field as supplementary feed for upland game birds. Pen-reared pheasants are released for fall hunting. Other public uses include waterfowl hunting and trout fishing.
    Viewing Opportunities

    Birds

  • Songbirds
  • Upland Birds
  • Mammals

  • Small Mammals
  • How to Get Here
    Access Site #1
    Driving Directions
    From Goldendale, drive 4 mi. west on State Highway 142, to the intersection with Hill Road (on a bend in the highway). Go north on Hill Rd. about 0.6 mi. There, a primitive road intersects from the east. This is the main access road to the unit.
    Parking/Restroom Information
    Parking is allowed along the road. There is no restroom facility.
    Other Information
    This is a day use area. No camping or fires are permitted.
    Unique Features
    Spring Creek flows through this unit, and is available for fishing. Most of the acreage is managed as a pheasant release site.
    Other Information
    The Goldendale Hatchery Unit is managed as a pheasant hunting area. Fishing is permitted along Spring Creek (see Fishing Regulations). This 240 acre site is bordered by Fish Hatchery Road on the north, and Hill Road to the west. From Highway 142, drive about 0.7 mi. north on Hill Road and turn right on a dirt road (just north of Spring Creek) to access the site. This unit is day-use only. Marmots are sometimes observed on this unit. They present an interesting viewing opportunity for visitors. No hunting of this species is allowed.
    Mineral Springs is located in the Klickitat River Canyon. The 1,108-acre area is mostly Oregon white oak, ponderosa pine woodlands and some Douglas fir. Grasslands occur on south slopes. Wildlife species include deer, grouse, turkeys and many songbirds associated with the riparian habitat. The chimney of an old water bottling plant on the property is a roost site for Vaux’s swifts. Public use is primarily for fishing and hunting, with a boat access site and overnight camping.
    Viewing Opportunities

    Birds

  • Birds of Prey
  • Eagles
  • Upland Birds
  • Waterfowl
  • Mammals

  • Deer
  • How to Get Here
    Access Site #1
    Driving Directions
    From Klickitat, go 2.2 mi. east on State Highway 142 to the entrance of the Mineral Springs river access site.
    Parking/Restroom Information
    Parking is permitted along the road and in camping areas. A vault toilet is maintained in the campground.
    Other Information
    Overnight camping is permitted. Campfires are allowed except during the seasonal burn ban, usually June 1 through October 30.
    Unique Features
    One building of the old Gas-Ice Plant remains on the property, near the campground. The chimney of the building serves as a roosting site for Vaux's swifts during migration. A boat launching ramp is accessible from the campground. Swifts roost in large numbers in the chimney during their spring and fall migrations. The birds probably also use the chimney for nesting during summer.
    Other Information
    The primary management focus for this unit is to provide access to the river for fishing, and to protect the riparian habitat along the river. A boat ramp and restroom facilities are located at the Mineral Springs Campground. The Klickitat Trail, which follows the east and south bank of the river, offers hiking and mountain biking use through this unit. The nearest parking area for the Klickitat Trail is adjacent to Schilling Road, near its junction with Horseshoe Bend Road. Rules for use of the trail are posted at the trailhead.
    Fisher Hill consists of several parcels over roughly 500 acres. It is located on the Klickitat River, downstream from the Dillacort Canyon unit. This segment of the river flows through a narrow channel that was fished by the Yakama Tribe and remains an important fishing site. Habitat types at Fisher Hill are pine-oak woodlands and open grasslands similar to those at Dillacort Canyon.
    Viewing Opportunities

    Birds

  • Birds of Prey
  • Eagles
  • Songbirds
  • Upland Birds
  • Waterfowl
  • Mammals

  • Deer
  • Small Mammals
  • Other

  • Wildflowers
  • How to Get Here
    Access Site #1
    Driving Directions
    Properties comprising the Fisher Hill Unit are distributed along State Route 142. The parcel farthest downstream on the Klickitat River is approximately 1 mi. NE of Lyle. A river access site is located at Milepost 5.
    Parking/Restroom Information
    Parking is along the road and in the camping area at Milepost 5.
    Other Information
    Overnight camping is allowed at the Milepost 5 river access site. Campfires are permitted except during the seasonal burn ban, which usually runs from June 1 to October 30.
    Unique Features
    The Klickitat Trail passes through the Fisher Hill Unit. The Klickitat Trail is a popular hiking and mountain biking route. It is accessed along Highway 142, at Lyle, and also from the lower end of the Fisher Hill Road, just west of its crossing over the river.

    The Klickitat Trail is open to nonmotorized use. Horses are not presently allowed on the trail. Dogs should be on leash to prevent conflicts with other users and landowners.

    Rules for the use of the Klickitat Trail are posted at the access points.

    Other Information
    The primary management objective for this unit is protection of riparian habitat along the Klickitat River, to maintain fish and wildlife habitat quality.
    The 340-acre Dillacort Canyon unit is located within the Klickitat River Canyon. WDFW and BLM jointly manage portions of the property. Habitat types include oak woodlands, grasslands and riparian areas. A water access site along the Klickitat River is popular for camping and fishing.
    Viewing Opportunities

    Birds

  • Birds of Prey
  • Songbirds
  • Upland Birds
  • Waterfowl
  • Mammals

  • Deer
  • Small Mammals
  • How to Get Here
    Access Site #1
    Driving Directions
    This unit is approximately 5.5 miles NE of Lyle. Access to the site is Milepost 5 on Highway 142 along the Klickitat River.
    Parking/Restroom Information
    Parking is adjacent to the highway.
    Other Information
    The best camping and parking area is near Milepost 5, on the west side of Highway 142, beside the Klickitat River. The Klickitat Trail, which follows the west bank of the river, is an excellent hiking and mountain biking route. The nearest access points to the trail are at the lower end of the Fisher Hill Road (just west of the bridge over the river), and at Pitt, north of the Highway 142 bridge across the river.

    Rules for the use of the Klickitat Trail are posted at the access points.

    The Sondino Ponds unit is considered the most important western pond turtle habitat in Washington. WDFW bought the 219-acre area near Lyle to protect this species. The parcel historically was used for agriculture and contains seasonal and year-round wetlands. Access to the unit is restricted in order to maintain the turtle population and restore the native habitat.
    Viewing Opportunities

    Birds

  • Songbirds
  • Other

  • Reptiles/Amphibians
  • How to Get Here
    Access Site #1
    Driving Directions
    From Lyle, the unit is located approximately 3 mi. west on Old Highway 8.
    Parking/Restroom Information
    There is no parking or restroom facility.
    Other Information
    Access is closed year-round, except by written authorization from WDFW.
    Other Information
    Wildlife may be viewed from the county roads (Old Highway 8 and Balch Road). Group events or tours may occur with written permission from the Wildlife Area Manager for access to the property. Permission may be granted for educational activities, scientific data collection, or for volunteer work under guidance of WDFW for management of the site. Please contact the wildlife area headquarters at 509-773-4459 if you would like to schedule an activity on the Sondino Unit.

    Viewing Opportunities

    Birds

  • Birds of Prey
  • Eagles
  • Songbirds
  • Upland Birds
  • Wading Birds
  • Waterfowl
  • Mammals

  • Bear
  • Bighorn sheep
  • Deer
  • Elk
  • Small Mammals
  • Other

  • Butterflies
  • Reptiles/Amphibians
  • Spawning Salmon
  • Wildflowers
  • How to Get Here
    Access Site #1
    Driving Directions
    Sheep Company Road Access: From I-82 take exit 26 and go West approximately 1/4 mile to Hwy 823/Harrison Rd. Turn left (West) onto Harrison Rd., go two miles until it intersects with North Wenas Rd. Take a right onto North Wenas Rd. and go 4.8 miles to Sheep Company Rd. Turn right (North) onto Sheep Company Rd, go approximately 1 mile to access onto the wildlife area. Once you cross the cattle guard you are on the wildlife area. Please follow Green Dot Road Management regulations, and use a Green Dot map of the area for reference.
    Parking/Restroom Information
    No developed parking areas and no restrooms are provided.
    Other Information
    No campfires from April 15 to October 15. The Wildlife Area is within a Green Dot Road Management area. Maps and regulations are available at the Regional Office, District Office and DNR's SE Regional Office. In addition, yellow readerboards with maps are placed at entry points. Motorized vehicles must stay on designated green dot roads.
    Access Site #2
    Driving Directions
    Cleman Mountain Access: From I-82 take exit 26 and go West approximately 1/4 mile to Hwy 823/Harrison Rd. Turn left (West) onto Harrison Rd., go two miles until it intersects with North Wenas Rd. Turn right onto North Wenas Road and travel on it for 17.3 miles. There will be a WDFW sign and a gate in the elk fence on the left (south). This is the entrance to the Clemans Mountain unit. Please close the gate behind you. Please follow Green Dot Road Management regulations, and use a Green Dot map of the area for reference. This area is closed each winter for the protection of wintering elk. Closure begins approximately December 15, and reopens May 1.
    Parking/Restroom Information
    No developed parking areas and no restrooms are provided.
    Other Information
    No campfires from April 15 to October 15. The Wildlife Area is within a Green Dot Road Management area. Maps and regulations are available at the Regional Office, District Office and DNR's SE Regional Office. In addition, yellow readerboards with maps are placed at entry points. Motorized vehicles must stay on designated green dot roads. Each winter the Cleman Mountain unit of the wildlife area is closed to all public access for the protection of wintering elk. The closure begins upon initiation of supplemental feeding, typically in early to mid-December, and reopens May 1.
    Unique Features
    Skyline trail follows the Yakima Canyon rim overlooking the Yakima River. No motorized vehicles are allowed.

    The Umtanum trail begins in the Yakima River Canyon at the BLM Umtanum Recreation Site and follows Umtanum Creek up through several miles of the wildlife area through shrub-steppe and riparian habitats. The Umtanum Falls trail takes off from the Umtanum Road (Ellensburg Pass Road) and follows Umtanum Creek downstream to the falls (approximately 1.25 miles).

    The upper Wenas Valley is considered an important bird area by Audobon.

    Other Information
    No campfires are allowed from April 15 to October 15. Motorized vehicles must stay on designated green dot roads.
    The Abernathy Creek unit is 138 acres managed for riparian and upland forest habitat and fishing access. It is located on Abernathy Creek near the Columbia River.
    Viewing Opportunities

    Birds

  • Birds of Prey
  • Eagles
  • Songbirds
  • Other

  • Spawning Salmon
  • How to Get Here
    Access Site #1
    Driving Directions
    West on SR 4 from Longview approx 10 miles, north on Abernathy Creek Road 0.1 miles, first road on left.
    Parking/Restroom Information
    Park at pullout by the gate.
    Other Information
    Access site is closed and gated due to past frequent vandalism on the site. Walk in only.
    Unique Features
    Chum salmon spawning in this reach of the stream.
    Other Information
    Access site is walk-in only.
    The 177-acre Altoona Unit consists of three parcels located along the Grays and Deep Rivers north of Grays Bay. The parcels contain sitka spruce forest, tidelands and mudflats, as well as forested wetlands. The tideland and mudflat parcel is only accessible by boat. The Oneida Boat Launch and Access Site is located on the western-most parcel.
    Viewing Opportunities

    Birds

  • Waterfowl
  • Shorebirds
  • Wading birds
  • Eagles
  • How to Get Here
    Access Site #1
    Driving Directions
    Route 1 to the tidelands and Oneida Boat Launch: From Skamokawa, travel west 18 miles on State Highway 4 to Oneida Road. Turn south on Oneida Road and drive two miles to the Oneida Access Site and boat launch. The tideland parcel starts half-mile downstream on Deep River.
    Parking/Restroom Information
    There are no parking areas or restrooms on the tideland parcel along Grays Bay or the eastern upland forested parcel off of Miller Point Road.

    There is a parking area and restrooms at the Oneida Access site and boat launch.

    Access Site #2
    Driving Directions
    Route 2 to the eastern-most, upland sitka spruce parcel: From State Highway 4 in Wahkiakum County, turn south onto Mill Pond Road. Go about half-mile then turn left onto Miller Point road and travel about a quarter-mile to the site.
    Parking/Restroom Information
    There are no parking areas or restrooms on the tideland parcel along Grays Bay or the eastern upland forested parcel off of Miller Point Road.

    There is a parking area and restrooms at the Oneida Access site and boat launch.

    Unique Features
    Post mature spruce forest
    Other Information
    The tideland parcel floods on a daily basis. During low tides the vast majority of the unit becomes mudflats. Users should check the tides and water levels before traveling to the area to ensure access to and from the unit.
    The 121-acre Canal Road unit is managed for wetland/waterfowl habitat. It is located on the east end of Silver Lake.
    Viewing Opportunities

    Birds

  • Songbirds
  • Waterfowl
  • Other

  • Reptiles/Amphibians
  • How to Get Here
    Access Site #1
    Driving Directions
    From SR 504 in the town of Toutle turn South onto Sightly Rd and travel about 1 3/4 miles to Canal Rd. Turn right and travel about 1/2 mile.
    Parking/Restroom Information
    None
    This 39-acre unit provides protection of wetland habitat used by waterfowl. It is located south of La Center. The area provides hunting opportunities
    Viewing Opportunities

    Birds

  • Songbirds
  • Wading Birds
  • Waterfowl
  • How to Get Here
    Access Site #1
    Driving Directions
    Accessible only by boat. About 2 miles upstream from the LaCenter Bridge on the East Fork Lewis River then a short walk across County Park lands to the site (not marked)
    The Fisher Island unit is 257 acres primarily maintained as forested floodplain. Columbian white-tailed deer reside on this small island in the Columbia River.
    Viewing Opportunities

    Birds

  • Birds of Prey
  • Eagles
  • Shorebirds
  • Songbirds
  • Wading Birds
  • Waterfowl
  • Mammals

  • Deer
  • How to Get Here
    Access Site #1
    Driving Directions
    Access by boat from the Willow Grove boat launch on the Columbia River. Island is just upstream from the ramp.
    Other Information
    Vegetation on the island is very dense and very difficult to travel through.
    The 43-acre Gardner Unit is managed for riparian habitat and fishing access. It is located northeast of Silver Lake. The area is at the confluence of the North and South Fork Toutle Rivers and is part of the debris plain of the Mount St. Helens eruption. The unit provides fishing access to both forks of the Toutle River.
    Viewing Opportunities

    Birds

  • Songbirds
  • How to Get Here
    Access Site #1
    Driving Directions
    From SR 504 in the town of Toutle turn south onto S. Toutle River Rd and travel about 1/2 half miles. Access is through Harry Gardner Park on north side of the road.
    Unique Features
    Area heavily impacted by the 1980 mudflows and erosion since that time.
    Other Information
    Site is accessed through Harry Gardner County Park.
    The Hall Road unit is 132 acres managed for wetland habitat and upland forest. It is located north of Silver Lake.
    Viewing Opportunities

    Birds

  • Songbirds
  • Wading Birds
  • Waterfowl
  • Mammals

  • Deer
  • How to Get Here
    Access Site #1
    Driving Directions
    The site straddles SR 504 at about MP 10 in Cowlitz County. Most of the site is within Silver Lake.
    The Jenny Creek unit is 20 acres that provide band-tailed pigeon habitat. It is located north of La Center. Mineral springs are maintained and protected. This small site was acquired for band-tailed pigeon hunting however the mineral spring is no longer used by pigeons.
    Viewing Opportunities

    Birds

  • Songbirds
  • Waterfowl
  • How to Get Here
    Access Site #1
    Driving Directions
    I-5 Exit6 21, Woodland, go North 1 block, E over bridge .1 mi on County Rd 16, South 3.8 mi to County Rd 39, East .6 mi to site
    The 59-acre Nellie Corser unit contains mature forest with unique waterfalls. It is located west of North Bonneville.
    Viewing Opportunities

    Birds

  • Songbirds
  • Northern Spotted Owls
  • Mammals

  • Deer
  • Fishers
  • Other

  • Larch Mountain Salamanders
  • How to Get Here
    Access Site #1
    Driving Directions
    From SR 14 just west of the Skamania Store, turn north up hill on Duncan Creek Road, go 3 miles across bridge stay left on dirt road. Roadside parking about 1/4 mile from end of pavement.
    Unique Features
    A short trail leads to a waterfall on Duncan Creek. Post mature Douglas Fir forest.
    The 20-acre Nelson unit lies within the Columbia River floodplain and is managed for waterfowl production. It is located south of Kelso.
    Viewing Opportunities

    Birds

  • Songbirds
  • Waterfowl
  • How to Get Here
    Access Site #1
    Driving Directions
    Very small site at downstream tip of the Port of Kalama area. Accessible only by boat.
    Other Information
    Site is accessible only by boat.
    The Two-Forks unit is 48.5 acres and provides stream access with riparian habitat. It is located west of La Center.
    Viewing Opportunities

    Birds

  • Songbirds
  • Waterfowl
  • Mammals

  • Deer
  • How to Get Here
    Access Site #1
    Driving Directions
    From the town of Woodland cross the Lewis River and travel South on NW Pacific Hwy about two miles to Toenjes Rd. Turn right. Site is about 1/4 mile on right just after crossing under I-5.
    Parking/Restroom Information
    The Two Forks water access site provides walk-in access only.
    The White Island unit is 130 acres of floodplain habitat maintained as Columbia white-tailed deer habitat. It is located on White Island in the Columbia River upstream of Puget Island and the town of Cathlamet.
    Viewing Opportunities

    Birds

  • Songbirds
  • Waterfowl
  • Mammals

  • Deer
  • How to Get Here
    Access Site #1
    Driving Directions
    Columbia River Island at the upstream end of Puget Island in Wahkiakum County. The Puget Island water access site provides boat launch to site.
    Unique Features
    Columbian White-Tailed Deer
    Other Information
    Site is accessible only by boat.
    This 3,897-acre property is privately owned and managed by a foundation with by-laws that keep it from ever being sold. WDFW determined a hunting and fishing easement was the best option to provide recreational access and purchased a perpetual easement in 1986. Changes in management of the ranch have resulted in an accelerated grazing program, which has substantially degraded the habitat. WDFW staff continues to work with managers and a board of trustees to try to minimize the effects on the resource and public recreation.
    Viewing Opportunities

    Birds

  • Birds of Prey
  • Shorebirds
  • Songbirds
  • Upland Birds
  • Wading Birds
  • Waterfowl
  • Mammals

  • Deer
  • Elk
  • Other

  • Reptiles/Amphibians
  • How to Get Here
    Access Site #1
    Driving Directions
    Beginning on State Highway 17 near Mesa in Franklin Co, drive west on State Route 170 through Basin City, to Sagehill Road. Go north on Sagehill for .75 mile, turn right onto irrigation ditchbank road. Take ditchbank road to canal bridge, cross bridge, take a left and drive 200 yards into south parking lot.
    Parking/Restroom Information
    No restrooms at either lot. 5 car limit in each of the 2 parking lots during the general hunting season. No overnight camping.
    Other Information
    Register to Hunt area. This site is only open for hunting on Sat., Sun., Wed., and legal holidays. This is a perpetual hunting easement only. Limited fishing may be available by contacting the Bailie Youth Ranch
    Access Site #2
    Driving Directions
    North lot: continue north on Sagehill for 5 more miles, turn right on Hendricks and drive 1.5 miles to parking lot (on right).
    Unique Features
    Nearly 4,000 acres in size, the Bailie Ranch is a public hunting easement only. A creek runs the entire length of the property, about 4.5 miles. Limited creek crossing access. The area is mostly shrub steppe habitat with many wetlands scattered throughout.
    Other Information
    Grazing occurs seasonally. Competition for the 5 parking slots can be difficult during peak waterfowl season. No overnight camping.
    The Benton City unit comprises 15.52 acres of Yakima riverfront property directly west of the town of Benton City along the Yakima River.
    Viewing Opportunities

    Birds

  • Songbirds
  • Upland Birds
  • Waterfowl
  • How to Get Here
    Access Site #1
    Driving Directions
    In Benton Co., from I-82, take the Benton City exit & head north toward Benton City. Traveling on Hwy 225, at the second 90 degree bend, turn left and continue west. After this street turns north, it becomes 14th street and the parking lot is about a block ahead on the left.
    Parking/Restroom Information
    Small gravel parking lot, which may be improved in the future.
    Other Information
    Open 24/7 unless the city changes the ordinances.
    Unique Features
    This is a relatively small parcel with frontage on the Yakima River. Good birding available within the riparian zone. Shoreline fishing available.
    Other Information
    Benton City manages a hiking trail, picnic tables.
    The Byron unit encompasses 1,031 acres located five miles east of Mabton and five miles south of Grandview. This unit was purchased in 1948 with emphasis on waterfowl management. The terrain is a series of depressions and rolling hills. A major drain, carrying ground water and irrigation water, runs through the area creating a series of ponds over two miles that total about 400 surface acres. The Byron Ponds, as they are called, have historically produced excellent waterfowl nesting and brooding areas. They are also important during the shorebird migration. However, a severe carp infestation has lowered the productivity as a brood rearing area. Livestock grazing was removed several years ago, which has changed the complexion of the habitat. Tule and purple loosestrife infestations have increased in recent years. The surrounding uplands are used extensively by Canada geese, which graze on green cheat grass in late winter and early spring. A series of wetlands comprises at least 40 percent of the area. The major upland habitat type is shrub steppe, but a long history of fire and grazing has resulted in severely degraded condition. Cheatgrass and Russian knapweed are the most prevalent weedy species on this site but shallow, rocky soils make it difficult to restore native vegetation. The west end of the unit is heavily hunted, with some fishing occurring in the ponds that have perennial water. The east end of the unit is made up of the Byron Reserve where hunting is excluded but bird watching has become an attraction.
    Viewing Opportunities

    Birds

  • Birds of Prey
  • Shorebirds
  • Songbirds
  • Upland Birds
  • Wading Birds
  • Waterfowl
  • Other

  • Reptiles/Amphibians
  • How to Get Here
    Access Site #1
    Driving Directions
    In Yakima Co., take state highway 22 east from Mabton, about 4.7 miles. Watch for a small, unimproved gravel driveway on the north side of the highway. Take it across a private RR crossing into the parking lot, which is mostly hidden behind trees.
    Parking/Restroom Information
    No facilities. Gravel parking lot only.
    Other Information
    The area is open during the general hunting season. It is closed the rest of the year to protect nesting waterfowl and due to persistent illegal dumping. That portion of the property lying east of the Mabton Siphon (large concrete pipe) is the Byron Reserve (no guns, traps or dogs are allowed).
    Access Site #2
    Driving Directions
    From Mabton, drive east on highway 22 for 3.5 miles to Bus Road. Go north on Bus Road about 0.5 mi. Just before the 90 degree turn to the west, enter the parking lot to the east, via a narrow cut in the rocks.
    Parking/Restroom Information
    No facilities
    Other Information
    Same as Site #1.
    Unique Features
    A wetland system runs the entire length of this property (approx. 2 miles) with only one crossing at the halfway point.
    Other Information
    Very harsh, rocky terrain. Rattlesnakes are common.
    The Clark Pond unit is located 4.5 miles southwest of Mesa in Franklin County. The property is owned by US Bureau of Reclamation but is managed for wildlife by WDFW.
    Viewing Opportunities

    Birds

  • Birds of Prey
  • Songbirds
  • Upland Birds
  • Waterfowl
  • Other

  • Reptiles/Amphibians
  • How to Get Here
    Access Site #1
    Driving Directions
    In Franklin Co, from I-182, take the 4th Ave/Glade Road exit. Drive north on Glade for 17 miles. Turn right and go east on Ironwood for 3 miles. Parking lot is on north side of road.
    Parking/Restroom Information
    Gravel lot. No restroom
    Other Information
    Open 24/7
    The Esquatzel Coulee unit is located just north of Mesa in Franklin County. The property is owned by US Bureau of Reclamation but WDFW manages the parcel for public fishing and hunting access.
    Viewing Opportunities

    Birds

  • Birds of Prey
  • Songbirds
  • Upland Birds
  • Waterfowl
  • Mammals

  • Deer
  • Other

  • Reptiles/Amphibians
  • How to Get Here
    Access Site #1
    Driving Directions
    In Franklin Co., from hwy. 395, take the hwy 17 exit at Mesa. Drive north on hwy 17, toward Othello. Cross the bridge over the Esquatzel Coulee and take a right off the hwy on the north side of the bridge. Follow road back to the south, across the Esquatzel Canal, and follow the canal upstream to parking lots.
    Parking/Restroom Information
    No facilities
    Other Information
    Open 24/7
    Unique Features
    The Bureau of Reclamation/South Columbia Basin Irrigation District is developing habitat within the coulee for improved upland bird production.
    The Glover unit is made up of 45 acres located west of Sunnyside in Yakima County.
    Viewing Opportunities

    Birds

  • Birds of Prey
  • Songbirds
  • Upland Birds
  • Waterfowl
  • Other

  • Reptiles/Amphibians
  • How to Get Here
    Access Site #1
    Driving Directions
    In Yakima Co., from I-82, take exit 67 and head south on Midvale Road. Go .25 mile, turn right on Emerald Road. Go 2 miles, turn left on Wendell-Phillips Road. Go 0.5 mile and take the unimproved gravel driveway to the right. Drive to the end and the parking lot.
    Parking/Restroom Information
    No facilities.
    Other Information
    Open daylight hours.
    Other Information
    This is a small site (50 acres) surrounded by private land.
    The Sunnyside Headquarters unit covers 2,786 acres one mile north of Mabton and five miles south of Sunnyside. The Headquarters unit is a collection of small agricultural fields, interspersed with diverse habitats. Six ponds or lakes vary in size from 15 to 100 surface acres and evidence of old river oxbows can also be found throughout. Vegetation ranges from wetland species to upland perennial grasses and forbs to mature riparian woodlands. Russian olives have been invading for several years. Horseshoe Lake, an old river oxbow, is an important resting place for wintering waterfowl. Horseshoe Lake falls within the Snipes Reserve, which is closed to all public entry. The largest lake, 100-acre Giffen Lake, is invaded by white lily pads. Farming has been reduced in recent years by restoring some of the dryland fields to native grasses and shrubs. About 468 acres remain under an agricultural lease, with about 124 acres in a dry land alfalfa/small grain rotation and the remainder irrigated. Waterfowl and upland game bird hunting and fishing are most popular.
    Viewing Opportunities

    Birds

  • Birds of Prey
  • Eagles
  • Shorebirds
  • Songbirds
  • Upland Birds
  • Wading Birds
  • Waterfowl
  • Mammals

  • Deer
  • Small Mammals
  • Other

  • Reptiles/Amphibians
  • How to Get Here
    Access Site #1
    Driving Directions
    Multiple parking areas on this unit. In Yakima Co., from I-82, take exit 67 and drive south on Midvale Road for 3.8 miles. Turn right on Holaday Road. Drive one mile. Parking lot is on left.
    Parking/Restroom Information
    No facilities
    Access Site #2
    Driving Directions
    From I-82, take exit 67 and drive south on Midvale Road for 2.5 miles. Turn right on Murray. Drive west for 3 miles and turn left on South Emerald Road. Drive one mile south where road ends in parking lot.
    Parking/Restroom Information
    No facilities.
    Unique Features
    This management unit includes nearly 13 miles of Yakima River shoreline. Diverse habitat and wildlife. Trespassing is not allowed within the Snipes Reserve, which lies near the center of this management unit.
    The Hope Valley unit consists of 160 acres located about four miles west-northwest of Eltopia in Franklin County. The unit is split into two parcels by a main irrigation canal. The parcel west of the canal is dryland, having no irrigation allotment. It is extremely sandy and two attempts have been made to stabilize the site with dryland grasses. Two or three shallow draws within this parcel receive some sub-irrigation from the canal, which supports emergent vegetation and Russian olive trees. The parcel on the north and east of the canal is a mix of shrub steppe habitat and cropland.
    Viewing Opportunities

    Birds

  • Birds of Prey
  • Songbirds
  • Upland Birds
  • Waterfowl
  • Other

  • Reptiles/Amphibians
  • How to Get Here
    Access Site #1
    Driving Directions
    In Franklin Co., from hwy 395, take Eltopia West Road at Eltopia, and drive west for 4.5 miles to Hooper Road. Turn right and drive north for 2.5 miles to the parking lot.
    Parking/Restroom Information
    No facilities.
    Other Information
    Open daylight hours.
    Other Information
    The property is split in half by the Eltopia Branch Canal.
    The I-82 unit consists of 980 acres located along the Yakima River in Yakima County in 17 separate parcels that form a narrow, discontinuous strip of ownership stretching from Union Gap to the Zillah interchange along Interstate 82. These parcels include a narrow, but high quality woody riparian corridor that transitions into dryland habitat. They provide public access to the river and to several ponds that were created when borrow pits for the interstate flooded with groundwater. Open water and wetlands comprise about 25 percent of the area. The Yakima River accounts for some of the open water in the form of backwater sloughs as well as the main riparian habitat, which is dominated by hardwoods mostly in the form of cottonwood trees. This habitat offers excellent nesting, brooding and winter cover for both waterfowl and upland birds. It’s also an important corridor for neotropical migrants and resident non-game birds. In addition to natural ponds, several man-made ponds have developed public access facilities that are unfortunately often overused and abused.
    Viewing Opportunities

    Birds

  • Birds of Prey
  • Eagles
  • Shorebirds
  • Songbirds
  • Upland Birds
  • Wading Birds
  • Waterfowl
  • Mammals

  • Deer
  • Other

  • Reptiles/Amphibians
  • Spawning Salmon
  • How to Get Here
    Access Site #1
    Driving Directions
    In Yakima Co., from I-82, take exit 44 and head south on Donald Road. Go about 150 yards and take the gravel ramp to the right down hill and into a small parking lot.
    Parking/Restroom Information
    No facilities.
    Other Information
    Daylight hours only.
    Access Site #2
    Driving Directions
    From I-82, take exit 50 and head north. Take Buena Loop to the left and follow to the large parking lot on the left.
    Parking/Restroom Information
    Large parking lot with restroom. This is the access for Pond #6
    Other Information
    Daylight hours only.
    Unique Features
    This management unit is comprised of multiple, broken ownerships along the north shore of the Yakima River. Very diverse habitat, including healthy riparian zone. The unit includes 7 ponds, visible from I-82.
    Other Information
    The I-82 unit has multiple points of access but several are complicated to find. In some cases, visitors must drive through private property to access state land. Some areas are reached by driving through culverts under the interstate, or hiking from parking areas and walking through culverts under the interstate. Detailed maps of these access points have not been developed. In general, other points of access are: 1. East end of Mellis Road to parking lot on south side of I-82. Walk through culvert to ponds #1 & #2 on north side of I-82. 2. Exit 44, parking area is in southeast quadrant from freeway cloverleaf. Walk approx. 1/2 mile along freeway right of way. Walk through culvert to north side of freeway and Pond #3. 3. From the old Yakima Hwy., take Flint Road to a large culvert under the freeway. Drive through, turn left, and drive to parking area for Ponds #4 & #5. Public restroom at this site. 4. From I-82, take exit 52. Head south and take first right into parking lot. This site has a public toilet and crude boat launch. All sites are open daylight hours only.
    The McDonald Bridge unit is located one mile east of Lowden on the Walla Walla River in Walla Walla County. When steelhead are migrating, the two total miles of river frontage provide fishing recreation. Cottonwood, willow, alder and red-osier dogwood are the dominant woody species with reed canary grass being the primary understory species. One site is being restored to native grass cover and another is actively farmed under an agricultural lease. Hunting for upland birds, turkeys, waterfowl and deer is popular.
    Viewing Opportunities

    Birds

  • Birds of Prey
  • Songbirds
  • Upland Birds
  • Waterfowl
  • Mammals

  • Deer
  • Other

  • Reptiles/Amphibians
  • How to Get Here
    Access Site #1
    Driving Directions
    In Walla Walla County, and beginning in Lowden, take Hwy 12 east for about one mile to McDonald Road. Go south on McDonald Road for approx. 0.4 mile, cross the Walla Walla River, and turn left into the parking lot.
    Parking/Restroom Information
    Gravel parking lot. No facilities
    Other Information
    Daylight hours only.
    Unique Features
    Two adjacent parcels provide access to one mile of the Walla Walla River. The unit has diverse riparian zone and wildlife.
    Other Information
    WDFW owns shoreline access for one-half mile upstream, on both sides of the river, plus one-half mile downstream but only on the south bank. Hunting is allowed by archery and shotgun only. Kiosk in parking lot provides additional details.
    The 60-acre Nipper unit is located within a sub-irrigated flat about four miles southwest of Mesa in Franklin County. The soil is highly alkaline and would be undesirable for farming. Grasses and shrubs were planted on the site shortly after it was purchased and the area provides good habitat for upland wildlife and non-game. The property abuts a parcel of BOR land commonly referred to as “Clark Pond”.
    Viewing Opportunities

    Birds

  • Birds of Prey
  • Shorebirds
  • Songbirds
  • Upland Birds
  • Wading Birds
  • Waterfowl
  • Other

  • Reptiles/Amphibians
  • How to Get Here
    Access Site #1
    Driving Directions
    This site is adjacent to, and north of Clark Pond and driving directions are listed under that management unit.
    Parking/Restroom Information
    No facilities.
    Other Information
    Daylight hours only.
    Other Information
    Clark Pond is owned by the Bureau of Reclamation and is managed by WDFW. The Nipper property lies just to the north of, and adjacent to Clark Pond. Both are accessible from a gravel parking lot along Ironwood Road in Franklin Co. Specific directions are listed under Clark Pond.
    The Rattlesnake Slope unit comprises 3,661 acres located five miles north of Benton City. Elevations range from 2000 feet along top of Rattlesnake Ridge to 400 feet on the lower portions at Horn Rapids. Historically this unit was a good example of native shrub-steppe habitat. A series of fires in the past few years, most notably in the summer of 2000, destroyed all but a few small remnants of the shrub component. A restoration seeding on about 900 acres in December 2000 is now showing very successful establishment of native grasses and shrubs. A smaller restoration project was implemented after another fire in 2003 and is showing promise. For the most part, the remainder of the area now exists as grassland but native forbs are beginning to reappear. Recreation includes horseback riding, target shooting, hiking and hunting. Chukar, deer and elk are the most likely species to be hunted.
    Viewing Opportunities

    Birds

  • Birds of Prey
  • Upland Birds
  • Mammals

  • Deer
  • Elk
  • Other

  • Reptiles/Amphibians
  • Wildflowers
  • How to Get Here
    Access Site #1
    Driving Directions
    In Benton Co., and from I-82, take the Benton City exit, drive north,through Benton City on state highway 225. From the interstate, drive about 7 miles on hwy 225. The parking lot is on the left.
    Parking/Restroom Information
    Gravel parking lot. No facilities
    Other Information
    Daylight hours only.
    Unique Features
    This is a 3,661 acre site with walk in traffic only. The east side of the property, nearest hwy 225, is highly disturbed and invasive plants are present. The interior portion of the site is good quality bunchgrass with many wildflowers in the early spring. Canyons and rimrock begin in the interior and spill out through the eastern slope of the property.
    Other Information
    A large area running parallel to the highway is leased by the Tri Cities Shooting Association as a multiple use, intensively managed target range. The boundary is fenced, which provides an adequate safety margin for those visiting the remainder of this management unit.
    The Thornton unit comprises 2,080 acres located about eight miles northeast of Prosser on the west side of Benton County, and about three miles southwest of the Rattlesnake Slope unit. It was acquired by WDFW in 1996 for mule deer, upland birds, transitory elk (the Rattlesnake Hills herd), sage grouse, and other shrub-steppe obligate species. By 1999 all 1,300 acres of croplands had been converted to native-like grasslands. Thornton supports long ridges of shrub steppe, intermixed with the former wheat fields. Future activities on this site may include the development of small check structures within the drainages to collect spring runoff. This will help maintain available water for wildlife and support more riparian vegetation. Currently, most intermittent water disappears by mid-summer. Snipes Creek bisects the unit and provides limited but important riparian habitat in places. A spring in the center of this unit provides free water nearly year round and other, smaller springs exist in other canyons. The unit is a popular hunting area for deer and elk. Historically, chukar hunting was common but populations have waned in recent years. The unit has two access sites, one along Rothrock Road on the west side and a new one along Case Road on the east side that compensates for the closure of Sharp Road.
    Viewing Opportunities

    Birds

  • Birds of Prey
  • Upland Birds
  • Mammals

  • Deer
  • Elk
  • Other

  • Reptiles/Amphibians
  • Wildflowers
  • How to Get Here
    Access Site #1
    Driving Directions
    In Benton Co., and from I-82, take exit 80 at Gap Road. Take Gap Road north 3.5 miles to Hanks Road. Take Hanks east for 4 miles to Rothrock Road. Take Rothrock north for 6.7 miles to a small parking lot on the right.
    Parking/Restroom Information
    Gravel parking lot. No facilities
    Other Information
    No overnight camping or open fires
    Access Site #2
    Driving Directions
    Continuing east from the intersection of Rothrock and Hanks Roads, drive 2 more miles to Case Road. Drive north on Case for 4 miles, then 1 mile to the east, then north for 1.5 miles to a small parking area on the left.
    Parking/Restroom Information
    Gravel drive-through parking lot for horse trailers. No facilities.
    Other Information
    No overnight camping or open fires.
    Unique Features
    Shrub steppe, intermixed with grass CRP fields. Several canyons cross the property, generally from north to south. Good quality shrub steppe with abundant wildflowers in the spring. This area is 3 miles across from Case Road to Rothrock Road.
    Other Information
    Sharp Road runs up a major canyon, providing historic access to the center of the property. This road was closed to minimize disturbance in the core habitat, and to reduce illegal dumping and vandalism. Limited disabled hunter drive-in access is available on this site by permit only.
    The Vance-Ferry Road unit is made of two parcels totaling 135.5 acres located one mile northeast of Mabton. The major cover type is agricultural fields that are farmed under a lease in a small grain/alfalfa hay rotation. It includes about three quarters of a mile of Yakima River shoreline, which consists of a cut-bank and very limited riparian vegetation. Cattle were removed from this site and a buffer was established along the river that exists as a mix of annual and perennial grasses and broadleaf weeds. A small island of natural shrubs, trees and herbaceous vegetation separates the Vance acquisition from the old Ferry Road habitat plot. A single row of mature elm trees lies along two segments of the boundary. Two shrub plots were planted on the Vance unit to break up the agricultural fields and provide more woody cover.
    Viewing Opportunities

    Birds

  • Birds of Prey
  • Songbirds
  • Upland Birds
  • Waterfowl
  • Other

  • Reptiles/Amphibians
  • How to Get Here
    Access Site #1
    Driving Directions
    In Yakima County, and from Highway 22, beginning about 2 miles east of Mabton, take Phillips Road north for 1 mile, to Euclid Road. Take Euclid west for 1.4 miles to Ferry Road. Take Ferry Road 1 mile north. Parking lot is on the right.
    Parking/Restroom Information
    Gravel parking lot. No facilities
    Other Information
    Daylight hours only. This site falls within a waterfowl hunting closure area. No waterfowl hunting is allowed within 1/4 mile of the Yakima River.
    Unique Features
    The site is mostly agricultural fields, with habitat borders. The Yakima river flows along the northern boundary.
    The WB-10 Wasteway property is located about eight miles northwest of Basin City in Franklin County. The parcel is owned by US Bureau of Reclamation but is managed for public fishing and hunting access by WDFW.
    Viewing Opportunities

    Birds

  • Birds of Prey
  • Upland Birds
  • Waterfowl
  • Mammals

  • Deer
  • Other

  • Reptiles/Amphibians
  • Wildflowers
  • How to Get Here
    Access Site #1
    Driving Directions
    In Franklin Co., and starting at Basin City on State Route 170, take 170 west 1 mile to Sagehill. Take Sagehill north for 2 miles To Hollingsworth. Go west on Hollingsworth for 2 miles to Waluke. Go north on Waluke for 2 miles to Filbert. Go west on Filbert for approx. 4.5 miles to Mt. Vista. Go north on Mt. Vista for approx. 2 miles to the bottom of the wasteway canyon. The management unit lies to the east of Mt. Vista Road.
    Parking/Restroom Information
    There is no specific parking area on this site. No restroom facilities.
    Other Information
    Daylight hours only.
    Unique Features
    This management unit is primarily a large canyon that carries irrigation wastewater from ag lands to the Columbia River. The water forms a series of ponds in the canyon bottom that can be good for spiny ray fishing.
    Other Information
    This property is owned by the Bureau of Reclamation and has been managed historically by WDFW. A new management agreement is currently being worked on and WDFW's involvement in day to day activities is limited to weed control. The road/pond system is currently impacted by beaver activity and vehicle access may be impossible. Be prepared to walk in from Mt. Vista Road.
    The Whitstran unit is made of two parcels comprising 31.57 acres located two miles east of Prosser along the Yakima River.
    Viewing Opportunities

    Birds

  • Birds of Prey
  • Songbirds
  • Upland Birds
  • Waterfowl
  • Other

  • Reptiles/Amphibians
  • How to Get Here
    Access Site #1
    Driving Directions
    In Benton Co., and from I-82 at Prosser, take exit 80 at Gap Road. Drive north on Gap Road for 0.5 mile to the Old Inland Empire Highway (OIE). Drive east on OIE for 2.5 miles to Bunn Road. Drive south on Bunn Rd. for approx. 0.4 mile, cross a narrow bridge over the Chandler irrigation canal, and turn left on the ditchbank road. Drive east on the ditchbank road for approx. 1.5 miles. Parking lot is a small area surrounded by concrete ecology blocks, and lies to the south of, and below the ditchbank road.
    Parking/Restroom Information
    Gravel parking lot. No facilities
    Other Information
    Daylight hours only.
    Unique Features
    Yakima River frontage. Shrub steppe and wetland habitat.
    Other Information
    Technically, the ditchbank road is not designed for public access but it remains open to provide access to a few private residences. Access to this management unit is only from Bunn Road, as the other end of the ditchbank road is gated.
    The Windmill Ranch unit consists of four separate parcels totaling 2,000 acres located about three miles northwest of Mesa in Franklin County. Parcels are owned by WDFW, DNR, and BOR, but all are managed by WDFW. Field corn is grown for the benefit of wintering waterfowl and migrating sandhill cranes. The rest of the area is a mosaic of several habitat types, including shrub-steppe, grasslands, ponds, wetlands and riparian shrub, and forest. A history of grazing and fire has removed much of the shrub component from the shrub-steppe areas but replanting efforts have restored at least part of it. Wetlands, primarily formed by irrigation seepage and wastewater and return flows, are also scattered throughout the property. Some are intensively managed for moist soil conditions and waterfowl production and winter food. Others are left to function naturally. The Columbia Basin Irrigation Project, which is the source of all water on this site, has created numerous sub-irrigated areas that are rife with noxious weeds such as Canada thistle, phragmites, purple loosestrife and salt cedar. A relatively new weed, hairy willow herb, was just discovered on this site in 2005.
    Viewing Opportunities

    Birds

  • Birds of Prey
  • Shorebirds
  • Songbirds
  • Upland Birds
  • Wading Birds
  • Waterfowl
  • Mammals

  • Deer
  • Elk
  • Other

  • Reptiles/Amphibians
  • How to Get Here
    Access Site #1
    Driving Directions
    In Franklin Co., and from Highway 17 near Mesa, take state route 170 west, toward Basin City. Drive 4 miles to Colonial Road. Drive north on Colonial Road for approx. .75 mile. The road makes a 90 degree turn to the east and ends in the south parking lot.
    Parking/Restroom Information
    Gravel parking lot. No facilities
    Other Information
    Register to Hunt; 5 car limit during hunting seasons only. No overnight camping or open fires. See kiosk for further information/restrictions
    Access Site #2
    Driving Directions
    From Highway 17, north of Mesa, take Merion Road and drive 2 miles west. Cross the Potholes Canal and turn right into the parking lot, which is hidden from view by a willow thicket. (do not take the canal access road).
    Parking/Restroom Information
    Gravel parking lot. No facilities
    Other Information
    same as the south parking lot. 5 car limit in each of the parking lots during the hunting seasons. Register to Hunt.
    Unique Features
    This 2,000 acre site provides very diverse habitat. It is a working ranch, with 9 center pivots providing irrigation to mostly small grains. Several shrub plantings and pond developments are scattered throughout the site. A large lake runs across the northern boundary. Sandhill cranes are a common site in the ag fields in the spring. Heavy concentrations of waterfowl are common in these fields after the hunting season. Foot traffic only
    Other Information
    This area can provide excellent upland and waterfowl hunting. The restricted access can result in high competition for parking slots at the beginning of the hunting season and again in late winter when waterfowl numbers are high.
    The Swegle Road unit is located about three miles west of College Place in Walla Walla County. This property is a complex of three separate acquisitions between 1991-1994.The Bughi parcel offers a 50-foot easement along the north shore of the Walla Walla River, a 25-foot easement along both shorelines of Mill Creek and a WDFW-owned parcel along the south shoreline of the Walla Walla River. The Visser parcel provides the only legal access to the WDFW-owned portion of Bughi, and the south shore of the river. Together these two properties provide fishing access to one-half mile of the Walla Walla River and about the same along Mill Creek. The Reser property provides access to a half mile of river upstream from Bughi and Visser. Much of the acquired land is limited to the natural riparian zone along the river, which supports good quality woody cover. All of the properties were purchased to provide public fishing but they also provide hunting for upland birds, turkeys, waterfowl and deer. Hunting is allowed on Reser by shotgun or archery but Bughi/Visser has been designated as a safety zone due to the proximity of homes. When steelhead are migrating, the two total miles of river frontage on these units provide a substantial amount of fishing recreation.
    Viewing Opportunities

    Birds

  • Birds of Prey
  • Songbirds
  • Upland Birds
  • Waterfowl
  • Mammals

  • Deer
  • Other

  • Reptiles/Amphibians
  • How to Get Here
    Access Site #1
    Driving Directions
    From Walla Walla, drive approximately 5 miles west on Hwy 12 to Swegle Road (turnoff for Whitman Mission). Drive south on Swegle for approx. 0.8 mi., cross the Walla Walla River bridge and the parking lot is on the east side of the road.
    Parking/Restroom Information
    Gravel lot. No facilities. Kiosk provides information and map of the area.
    Other Information
    Daylight hours only. Hunting is only allowed east of Swegle Road and only with shotgun or archery. All lands west of Swegle Road are in a safety zone. All lands are open for other recreational uses.
    Access Site #2
    Driving Directions
    Continuing from the Swegle Road parking lot, drive south approximately 0.2 mile to Stovall Road. Turn right and head west for approximately 0.25 mi. to parking lot on the north side of the road.
    Parking/Restroom Information
    Gravel lot. No facilities.
    Other Information
    This portion of the site is posted as a safety zone
    Unique Features
    The site includes a 25-foot fishing easement on both sides of Mill Creek, a 50-foot fishing easement on the north shore of the Walla Walla River. The site provides approximately one mile of river frontage. Deer, wild turkeys and other upland wildlife are common.
    The Shumaker unit is located in the southeast corner of Washington State along the Grande Ronde River. It was acquired with the use of mitigation funds in the early 1990’s from the dams on the Snake River creating slack water that flooded habitat. The rugged grassland canyons support populations of deer, elk, bighorn sheep, upland birds, and raptors. The Grand Ronde River is home to both steelhead and bull trout, both federally listed as threatened and managed as state species of concern. The area is popular with both anglers and hunters.
    Viewing Opportunities

    Birds

  • Birds of Prey
  • Eagles
  • Songbirds
  • Upland Birds
  • Mammals

  • Bear
  • Bighorn sheep
  • Deer
  • Elk
  • Small Mammals
  • Other

  • Butterflies
  • Reptiles/Amphibians
  • Wildflowers
  • How to Get Here
    Access Site #1
    Driving Directions
    From Asotin, travel south on Hwy 129 towards Anatone. Go past Anatone and turn left on Montgomery Ridge Road. Drive 1.5 miles east on Montgomery Ridge Road and turn right on Shumaker Grade Road. Travel south on Shumaker Grade all the way to the bottom. This is a narrow dirt road. At the bottom, take the first road to the left and travel along the river for approximately 4 miles to a gravel parking lot which is the entrance to the wildlife area.
    Parking/Restroom Information
    There is one parking area on the wildlife area that can accommodate 10 vehicles. No restrooms are available.
    Other Information
    The wildlife area is open year-round. However, travel on Shumaker Grade can be treacherous in winter due to snow and ice. Use caution and discretion during winter time.
    Unique Features
    Many white-tailed deer and some elk winter on the Shumaker unit. Steelhead fishing in the Grande Ronde is a heavy attraction for this wildlife area.
    The Grouse Flats unit is located in Garfield County about 65 miles southwest of the town of Asotin. Elevations range from 3,600 to 4,160 feet. It includes some ponds, but no year-round creeks or significant drainages.

    Grouse Flats was acquired in 1967 with the intent to reduce elk damage complaints and establish a large continuous wildlife area. About 200 acres of open meadows are currently enrolled in a sharecrop agreement to improve big game forage. Small ponds have been developed to increase water available to wildlife, and salt is provided annually.

    In addition to elk, Grouse Flats supports white-tailed and mule deer, turkey, ruffed and blue grouse, bear and cougar, and a multitude of non-game wildlife species including several state threatened and candidate species.

    Viewing Opportunities

    Birds

  • Birds of Prey
  • Eagles
  • Songbirds
  • Upland Birds
  • Mammals

  • Bear
  • Deer
  • Elk
  • Small Mammals
  • Other

  • Butterflies
  • Reptiles/Amphibians
  • Wildflowers
  • How to Get Here
    Access Site #1
    Driving Directions
    From Asotin, drive south on State Hwy 129 towards Anatone. From Anatone, continue south down the Rattlesnake Grade to the Grande Ronde River. At the Grande Ronde, take a right and drive west along the Grande Ronde to Troy, Oregon. From Troy Oregon, take the Troy/Pomeroy road and travel north up a steep grade for approximately 15 miles. Upon entering Washington, continue traveling to the intersection of Kessler/Mill Road. At the intersection, continue north for approximately 1/2 mile and take the first dirt road to the left, which is the entrance to the wildlife area.
    Parking/Restroom Information
    There are several pull off areas and camping areas along the gravel entrance road to the wildlife area. Do not drive into fields at the end of the gravel road. There are no restrooms available.
    Other Information
    Open year-round; however, snow will restrict motorized access in the winter.
    Unique Features
    This is mainly a deer and elk area. Wolves have been reported in this area and may be more observable in the future.
    The Asotin Creek unit is located in Asotin County, 16 miles southwest of the town of Asotin. This area includes portions of the North and South Forks of Asotin Creek, Charley Creek, and Lick Creek drainages.

    Acquisition of the original property in 1962 was sought to protect big game winter range and elk calving grounds; later purchases served to protect threatened salmonid species and their habitat. Asotin Creek is considered a critical watershed for steelhead, bull trout and spring Chinook salmon. The State of Washington has designated the drainage a wild steelhead refuge. The watershed is considered at high risk for habitat degradation due to fragmentation and stream modifications. Major habitat types include grasslands and dry coniferous forests. Deer, elk, turkey, quail, chukar, grouse, and many other species afford a variety of hunting and wildlife viewing opportunities.

    Viewing Opportunities

    Birds

  • Birds of Prey
  • Eagles
  • Songbirds
  • Upland Birds
  • Mammals

  • Bear
  • Bighorn sheep
  • Deer
  • Elk
  • Small Mammals
  • Other

  • Butterflies
  • Reptiles/Amphibians
  • Wildflowers
  • How to Get Here
    Access Site #1
    Driving Directions
    North Fork Parking Area: From the town of Asotin, head west on Asotin Creek Road. At the first intersection in the road, stay to the right and continue up the creek for approximately 10 miles to the entrance of the wildlife area. At the fork in the road, stay to the right and travel another 2 miles up the road. Parking area is on the left at the confluence of Lick Creek and North Fork of Asotin Creek.
    Parking/Restroom Information
    There is a parking lot available at the confluence of Lick Creek and North Fork of Asotin Creek. There are no restrooms available.
    Other Information
    The wildlife area is open to the public year-round. However, motorized vehicle traffic is restricted by a gate on the county road from December 1st to March 31st of each year to minimize disturbance to wintering wildlife. Gate opens April 1st.
    Access Site #2
    Driving Directions
    Warner Gulch Buildings: From the town of Asotin, head west on Asotin Creek Road. At the first intersection in the road, stay to the right and continue up the creek for approximately 10 miles to the entrance of the wildlife area. At the fork in the road, stay left on South Fork Road. Follow South Fork Road, which eventually leaves the creek bottom at a hayshed parking lot, and continues west up a steep grade. Follow the grade for approximately 5 miles until you come to a parking area on the left near the Warner Gulch buildings.
    Parking/Restroom Information
    There is a parking area at the South Fork hayshed and near the Warner Gulch buildings. Restroom facilities are not available.
    Other Information
    The wildlife area is open to the public year-round. However, motorized vehicle traffic is restricted by a gate on the County road from December 1st to March 31st of each year to minimize disturbance to wintering wildlife. Gate opens April 1st.
    Unique Features
    At the North Fork of the Asotin Creek Trail, bighorn sheep and other wildlife are visible, especially in the spring.
    Other Information
    Elk are usually highly visible on Smoothing Iron Ridge, especially in early morning and evening hours.
    The George Creek unit is located in Asotin County about 6 miles southwest of the town of Asotin. George Creek forms the largest sub-basin within the Asotin Creek watershed, but this creek, along with its tributaries Pintler and Rockpile creeks, has no surface flow for the majority of the lower reaches. This unit, including the Smoothing Iron ridge of the former Schlee Ranch, was acquired beginning in 2003 primarily for high quality shrub-steppe habitats of sharp-tailed grouse and elk.
    Viewing Opportunities

    Birds

  • Birds of Prey
  • Eagles
  • Songbirds
  • Upland Birds
  • Mammals

  • Bear
  • Bighorn sheep
  • Deer
  • Elk
  • Small Mammals
  • Other

  • Butterflies
  • Reptiles/Amphibians
  • Wildflowers
  • How to Get Here
    Access Site #1
    Driving Directions
    Meyers Ridge: From Asotin, drive west up Asotin Creek Road and take a left on Cloverland Grade Road. After about 1/4 mile, turn left on George Creek Road. Follow George Creek Road which eventually turns into Meyers Ridge Road and climbs a steep grade. Once on top of the grade, WDFW property is on either side of the road for several miles. Use caution when traveling this road under wet conditions. The road becomes very slippery in places.
    Parking/Restroom Information
    There are several parking areas along Meyers Ridge Road. No restroom facilities are available.
    Other Information
    Stay off roads when wet or in wintery conditions.
    Access Site #2
    Driving Directions
    Rockpile Parking Area: From Asotin, drive west up Asotin Creek Road and take a left on Cloverland Grade Road. Follow Cloverland Grade road up to the ridge top where the agricultural fields begin. Go approximately 5 miles to WDFW parking area on left side of road.
    Parking/Restroom Information
    There is room for 5 to 7 vehicles at this parking lot. No restroom facilities are available.
    Unique Features
    This area is comprised of steep rocky canyons with riparian areas in the canyon bottoms.
    The Weatherly unit straddles the Asotin-Garfield county line, due west of the Asotin Creek unit. It provides winter range for elk and other wildlife habitat.
    Viewing Opportunities

    Birds

  • Birds of Prey
  • Eagles
  • Songbirds
  • Upland Birds
  • Mammals

  • Bear
  • Bighorn sheep
  • Deer
  • Elk
  • Small Mammals
  • Other

  • Butterflies
  • Reptiles/Amphibians
  • Wildflowers
  • How to Get Here
    Access Site #1
    Driving Directions
    Fitzgerald Road: From Pomeroy, follow Peola Road south for approximately 10 miles. At the intersection of Peola Road and Mountain Road, turn left and drive towards the east on Peola Road. Follow the road down and up a grade until reaching an intersection with a paved road. Turn right on paved road and stay on pavement until intersection with Fitzgerald Road. Turn Left on Fitzgerald Road and drive east for approximately 3 miles to parking area located along road in elk fence.
    Parking/Restroom Information
    Parking area is large enough for 4 to 5 vehicles. No restroom facilities are available.
    Other Information
    Fitzgerald Road is closed during winter months.
    Other Information
    Elk fence runs along the north border of this area. Keep access gates closed.
    W.T. Wooten unit is approximately 16,445 acres. It is located in Columbia and Garfield counties, 25 miles east of Dayton and 14 miles south of Pomeroy. About 17 miles of the Tucannon River are located within the boundaries. Elevations range from 4,100 feet on Hopkins Ridge, down to 1,800 feet on the lowest section of the Tucannon River.

    Acquisition took place mainly between 1941 and 1943 to both minimize conflicts between wildlife and livestock and preserve habitat for wildlife and outdoor recreation. In the 1950's, eight artificial lakes were created to improve fishing opportunities.

    Lands in and around the Tucannon River are historic wintering areas for big game and receive year-round use by a variety of game and non-game species of wildlife, from black bears to wild turkeys. Camp Wooten, an Environmental Learning Center, was established in 1949 and is located on WDFW land leased and operated by the State Parks and Recreation Commission.

    The Tucannon River drainage is designated critical habitat for three federally endangered species --steelhead, Chinook salmon, and bull trout.
    Viewing Opportunities

    Birds

  • Birds of Prey
  • Eagles
  • Shorebirds
  • Songbirds
  • Upland Birds
  • Waterfowl
  • Mammals

  • Bear
  • Bighorn sheep
  • Deer
  • Elk
  • Small Mammals
  • Other

  • Butterflies
  • Reptiles/Amphibians
  • Spawning Salmon
  • Wildflowers
  • How to Get Here
    Access Site #1
    Driving Directions
    From Dayton: Travel east on Highway 12 approximately 13 miles to Tucannon River Road. Turn right and follow Tucannon River Road for approximately 20 miles. Wildlife area boundary and interpretive sign mark the beginning of WDFW land.
    Parking/Restroom Information
    Numerous day-use, camping, and lake parking areas are along Tucannon River Road. There are also numerous restroom facilities available to the public.
    Other Information
    The wildlife area is open year-round. Traffic is restricted to the main roads.
    Access Site #2
    Driving Directions
    From Pomeroy: Follow Highway 12 west approximately 14 miles to the intersection of Tucannon River Road. Turn left on Tucannon River Road and follow it for approximately 24 miles. Wildlife area boundary and interpretive sign mark the beginning of WDFW land.
    Parking/Restroom Information
    Numerous day-use, camping, and lake parking areas are along Tucannon River Road. There are also numerous restroom facilities available to the public.
    Other Information
    The wildlife area is open year-round. Traffic is restricted to the main roads.
    Unique Features
    The wildlife area has 8 man-made lakes for a put and take trout fishery. Fishing season begins March 1st of each year. There is an interpretive sign at the entrance to the wildlife area and also a wildlife viewing area. Deer are commonly seen feeding in the fields near the headquarters buildings in the evenings.
    The Sagebrush Flat unit is located 15 miles north of Ephrata and encompasses 3,740 acres. As the name suggests, the area is dominated by mature sagebrush. Numerous shrubsteppe dependent animals make their home here including the white-tailed rabbit, sage grouse, sage thrasher and sage sparrow among others.
    Viewing Opportunities

    Birds

  • Birds of Prey
  • Eagles
  • Songbirds
  • Upland Birds
  • Waterfowl
  • Mammals

  • Deer
  • Small Mammals
  • Other

  • Butterflies
  • Reptiles/Amphibians
  • Wildflowers
  • How to Get Here
    Access Site #1
    Driving Directions
    From Ephrata: Travel Hwy 28 to its intersection with 1st Ave. NW. Turn north onto 1st Ave NW (!st Ave NW becomes Sagebrush Flat/Moses Coulee Rd at Ephrata city line). Travel north approximately 16.5 miles. At its intersection with Douglas County Road 8 SE turn east onto Road 8. Travel approximately 1.6 to gate.
    Parking/Restroom Information
    There is no parking area and no restroom facilities.
    Access Site #2
    Driving Directions
    From US Highway 2: Travel Hwy 2 to its intersection with Sagebrush Flat/Moses Coulee Rd. Turn south onto Sagebrush Flat/Moses Coulee Rd. Travel south approximately 7.5 miles. At its intersection with Douglas County Road 8 SE turn east onto Road 8. Travel approximately 1.6 to gate.
    Parking/Restroom Information
    There is no parking area and no restroom facilities.
    Unique Features
    This is the only location in Washington where a rare plant, puzzling rockcress, is known to exist.
    The Davis Creek Unit is approximately 500 acres and is located just outside of the town of Oakville near State Hwy 12. Most of the land owned by the Department is best characterized as open wetland, riparian shrub habitat, meadow/field habitat, and oak woodland. Oregon white oak communities are uncommon on the west side of the Cascade Mountains and north of the Columbia River. This oak community is valuable to wildlife because of the acorn crop it produces. The various habitats on this unit are interspersed and thus, allow for an abundance of diverse species. Species known to exist in the area include Olympic mud minnows, mink, shorebirds, elk, deer, fox, coyote, bobcat, grouse, abundant waterfowl, trumpeter swans, and a variety of salmon species. The property hosts a number of recreational activities and is actively farmed for hay through an agricultural lease. Other popular activities include hunting for waterfowl, deer, elk, and doves. The site also hosts numerous specially permitted events for dog field trials and training. There is Chehalis River access for fishing on the eastern boundary of the property. This is an excellent birding area and is recognized by the Puget Lowlands Riparian Bird Conservation Area as a priority habitat. The parking area contains an interpretive kiosk with information about the unit and a toilet facility.

    Unit Rules and Conditions

    Field Trials and Dog Events


    Viewing Opportunities

    Birds

  • Birds of Prey
  • Eagles
  • Songbirds
  • Upland Birds
  • Wading Birds
  • Waterfowl
  • Mammals

  • Deer
  • Elk
  • Coyote
  • Fox
  • Small Mammals
  • Other

  • Butterflies
  • Reptiles/Amphibians
  • Wildflowers
  • How to Get Here
    Access Site #1
    Driving Directions
    From Elma: Drive south on Hwy 12 to Porter. Make a right on Porter Creek Rd, then a left on South Bank Rd. Follow South Bank Rd for approximately 7 miles and look for parking area and signs on the left.

    From Oakville: Head south on State St. from Hwy 12 for approximately 3.5 miles (State St. turns into South Bank Rd.) Look for parking area and signs on the right.

    Other Information
    No overnight camping or parking.
    Unique Features
    This unit supports a variety of important habitat types and is utilized by a wide variety of fish and wildlife species. Extensive freshwater emergent wetlands, off channel sloughs and Oregon white oak woodlands highlight the ecologically unique value of this unit.
    The 10,386-acre unit was acquired in 2009 and 2011 from Plum Creek Timber Company. The property is 35 miles northwest of Yakima in Kittitas County, lying north of the Naches River in the Rock Creek, Gold Creek, Milk Creek and upper Wenas Creek drainages. Multiple US Forest Service System roads provide access to the unit.

    Mountain goats roam the alpine areas in the Rock Creek unit, while the shrub steppe and basalt cliffs are home to elk, mule deer, and bighorn sheep. Rivers and streams flowing through the unit are used by bull trout, cutthroat and rainbow trout, as well as salmon. Recreation opportunities include hunting, camping, hiking, wildlife viewing and ORV trails. The unit has breathtaking views of Mount Rainier from the top of Bald Mountain and unique landforms like Devils Slide.

    The property is in checkerboard ownership with the U.S. Forest Service. The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife works with the Forest Service to manage several motorized trails, which provide a destination for motorized recreation in the summer and fall.

    Rock Creek Unit Road and Motorized Trail Map
    Best printed at 11x17 or larger

    Viewing Opportunities

    Birds

  • Birds of Prey
  • Eagles
  • Songbirds
  • Mammals

  • Bear
  • Deer
  • Elk
  • Mountain goats
  • Small Mammals
  • Other

  • Butterflies
  • Reptiles/Amphibians
  • Wildflowers
  • How to Get Here
    Access Site #1
    Driving Directions
    From Naches go west on US Hwy 12 for 4 miles to the junction with State Route 410 and go straight on SR 410. Continue approximately 15 miles on SR 410 to USFS 1701 Road on right (north). Turn on USFS 1701 and follow for 9 miles until entering WDFW land (odd numbered sections). You can also access the Rock Creek Unit off of SR 410 on the USFS 1702, 1705 and 1708 roads.
    Parking/Restroom Information
    No facilities.
    Unique Features
    The area is popular for hunting big-game, including deer, elk, and bear during fall seasons. Numerous motorized recreation trails.

    Charles and Mary Eder unit consists of 5,739 acres east of the town of Oroville and Osoyoos Lake. The previous owner has lifetime agreement with the department to farm 748 acres at the center of the unit.

    The unit shares border with Canada to the north. Private landowners have gradually begun building homes to the east and south. Fruit orchards and vineyards can be found to the west of the wildlife unit.

    The unit’s lands are predominately shrub-steppe habitat, with riparian habitat along Nine-mile and Tonasket creeks. The low elevation, 1,200 to 2,800 feet, and relatively mild winters attract large numbers of migratory deer, raptors and other wildlife.


    Viewing Opportunities

    Birds

  • Birds of Prey
  • Eagles
  • Songbirds
  • Upland Birds
  • Waterfowl
  • Mammals

  • Bear
  • Deer
  • Small Mammals
  • Other

  • Butterflies
  • Reptiles/Amphibians
  • Wildflowers
  • How to Get Here
    Access Site #1
    Driving Directions
    Go north on Highway 97 in central Washington to the town of Oroville. In the center of town, turn right on Central Avenue for .3 mi, turn left on Cherry Street, which turns into Chesaw Road. Continue another .4 mi and turn left on Eastlake Road. Continue 1.6 mi and turn right onto Eder Road, county road enters the wildlife area in .5 mi.
    Unique Features
    The Eder unit is an important wintering area for both mule deer and white-tailed deer. Deer migrate from three directions in the Okanogan Highlands when winter snowfall forces them to lower elevations. The shrub-steppe habitats east of Osoyoos Lake are critical wintering grounds for several hundred deer each winter.
    Other Information

    Hunting
    The area is managed as a quality hunting area thereby limiting the number of hunters that can access the property during the respective deer seasons. Permits are drawn each August for modern firearm, archery, muzzleloader, late whitetail, and youth permits. The area is open for public use at all other times of the year, and hunting for upland birds and small game are open per pamphlet regulations.

    Fishing
    The only area open for fishing is the canyon area of Nine mile Creek. Resident trout are present, however access to this area is difficult due to the private lands on both sides of Eder road, which does not access the wildlife area past the entry cattle guard.

    Camping
    Camping is limited to the reader board site at the entrance to the wildlife area. This is the only access road to the area, as the rest of the perimeter is bordered with private property.

    Other Recreation
    Hiking, biking and horseback riding. Non-motorized recreational activities are allowed, however currently there are no developed trail systems. Two-track farm roads cross the area in several locations and are used as trail routes. Just inside the entrance on Eder road is a pedestrian trail, intended to access the north half of the wildlife area. This trail crosses private property in route to public lands north of the hay field.

    Wildlife Observations and Photography

    Beebe Springs Unit covers 207 acres with 1 mile of Columbia River shoreline that includes riparian, wetland, upland shrub steppe and cliff/talus habitats. Beebe Springs Creek meanders through the eastern portion of the property. Extensive habitat restoration began on the area in 2005 and will continue several more years. Frank’s Pond was completed in 2015 and is open only to youth under 15 years of age for fishing. Fishing seasons are currently set by emergency rules.
    Viewing Opportunities

    Birds

  • Birds of Prey
  • Eagles
  • Songbirds
  • Waterfowl
  • Mammals

  • Bighorn sheep
  • Deer
  • Beaver
  • Otter
  • Other

  • Reptiles/Amphibians
  • Spawning Salmon and Steelhead
  • How to Get Here
    Access Site #1
    Driving Directions
    From Chelan, 3 miles east on Highway 150 to junction with Highway 97. North on Highway 97 0.4 mile to parking area.
    Parking/Restroom Information
    ADA parking and vault toilet.
    Other Information
    Main parking area for access to the unit east of Highway 97. Closed during hours of darkness.
    Access Site #2
    Driving Directions
    From Chelan, 1.4 miles east on Highway 150 to a trailhead and parking area on the east side of Highway 150.
    Parking/Restroom Information
    ADA parking for 12 vehicles. No restroom.
    Other Information
    Parking area for access to the Cultus Jim and Chelan Bob Trails and the portion of the unit west of Highway 97. Closed during hours of darkness.
    Unique Features
    Miles of ADA crushed rock trails with interpretive signage on gentle topography east of Highway 97. More challenging trails west of Highway 97. Adult steelhead can be observed in spawning in Beebe Creek during April and May while adult chinook and coho salmon can be observed in October and November.

    Frank’s Pond, located on the south end of the unit, provides fishing opportunities to juvenile anglers under 15 years of age. Fishing seasons are currently set by emergency rules and can be found on WDFW’s website. Please use the main parking area for access to Frank’s Pond.

    The 516-acre Swale Creek unit straddles Swale Creek, west of Centerville. The habitat is mostly steppe with riparian areas along two creeks, offering upland game bird hunting opportunities. Open hillsides support stands of native short grasses, balsamroot and several species of lupine. Gray partridge, golden eagles and western meadowlark can be found on the wildlife unit. Hiking and wildlife watching are popular activities at Swale Creek.
    Viewing Opportunities

    Birds

  • Eagles
  • Songbirds
  • Upland Birds
  • Waterfowl
  • Mammals

  • Deer
  • Small Mammals
  • Other

  • Wildflowers
  • How to Get Here
    Access Site #1
    Driving Directions
    The best public access to Swale Creek is via the Klickitat Trail from its crossing at Harms Road. The unit is approximately one-half miles west of Harms Road.
    Parking/Restroom Information
    Limited vehicle parking is available along Harms Road. During spring hiking season, a portable toilet, which is provided by the Klickitat Trail Conservancy, is placed at the point where Klickitat Trail crosses Harms Road.
    Other Information
    Visitors should note the rules for the use of the Klickitat Trail. The rules are posted at the entrance at Harms Road. The rule that dogs are to be kept on a leash is especially important during spring, when unleashed dogs can damage the nests of ground-nesting birds and disturb young or vulnerable wildlife species.

    Private property lies between Harms Road and the wildlife unit. Visitors are reminded to respect the boundaries.

    Unique Features
    The Klickitat Trail, a popular hiking and biking trail, runs east to west along Swale Creek. The trail is open to non-motorized use.
    The 800-acre West Rocky Unit is located two miles northwest of Tenino. It contains the unique south Puget Sound prairie ecosystem, which supports a variety of imperiled plant and animal species. Also found are riparian, wetland and forest habitats, including a two-mile stretch of Beaver Creek and an Oregon white oak community that is uncommon on the west side of the Cascade Mountains. The primary habitat management focus is the restoration and maintenance of prairie habitats using prescribed fire, exotic plant control, and the re-establishment of native species.

    Popular recreational activities include wildlife viewing, hunting, botanical studies. One parking area is located on the area.

    Hunting Opportunities

    Portions of this area may be temporarily closed to hunting due to ongoing management activities. Information regarding closures is posted here and/or on the kiosk at the parking area on 143rd Ave.


    Viewing Opportunities

    Birds

  • Birds of Prey
  • Songbirds
  • Upland Birds
  • Wading Birds
  • Waterfowl
  • Mammals

  • Deer
  • Small Mammals
  • Other

  • Butterflies
  • Reptiles/Amphibians
  • Wildflowers
  • How to Get Here
    Access Site #1
    Driving Directions
    A parking area is located on the north side of 143rd Ave SE approximately 275 feet east of Knowles Road SE.
    Parking/Restroom Information
    The parking area is small and does not provide a turnaround for trailers. No restroom facilities are available.
    Other Information
    Portions of this area may be temporarily closed to hunting due to ongoing management activities. Information regarding these closures will be posted above and/or on the informational kiosk at the parking area.
    Unique Features
    South Puget Sound prairies, Mima mounds, Beaver Creek

    The Similkameen – Chopaka Unit, which encompasses 1,139 acres, is located 18 miles west of Oroville along the Chopaka road.

    Lands to the north and south of the unit are privately owned and used primarily for hay production and cattle grazing. To the west are the steep slopes of Chopaka Mountain, which is owned by the Bureau of Land Management, rising to elevations of 8,000 feet on Hurley Peak. This slope provides a scenic backdrop to the lush valley bottom that is the Similkameen - Chopaka Wildlife Unit. The Similkameen River forms the eastern boundary and is lined with cottonwoods, aspen and alder.

    Deciduous shrubs include hawthorn, willows, dogwood, rose and snowberry, and grasses are dominated by introduced species like smooth brome. The center of the area has historically been farmed and is presently in a grass/alfalfa hay field of approximately 350 acres. To the west and across the Chopaka road is native shrub-steppe with sagebrush, rabbitbrush, and bitterbrush with grasses including bluebunch wheatgrass, Idaho fescue, and wild rye. An invasive plant species, diffuse knapweed, has severely infested this area, though efforts have been made to combat the problem knapweed. Stands of conifers in this area include ponderosa pine, and Douglas fir.

    The Similkameen River, and the cottonwood stands on the eastern boundary, floods annually but has maintained a good grass/shrub cover. Between these two habitats are primarily agriculture fields with irrigated alfalfa.

    The wildlife area is known for trophy white-tailed buck deer. Other big game animals include bighorn sheep and mountain goats on the slopes of Chopaka Mountain, black bear and cougar. Ruffed grouse use the riparian areas, and upland birds include ring-necked pheasant, gray partridge, California quail, chukar and mourning dove. Each spring, the ponds and oxbows are filled with Canada geese, dabblers and diving ducks of all kinds and trumpeter swans. The short meadow grass fields are forage for geese and waterfowl.


    Viewing Opportunities

    Birds

  • Birds of Prey
  • Songbirds
  • Upland Birds
  • Waterfowl
  • Mammals

  • Bear
  • Bighorn sheep
  • Deer
  • Mountain Goats
  • How to Get Here
    Access Site #1
    Driving Directions
    From Tonasket, take the Loomis highway northwest to the small town of Loomis. Stay right as the road will turn north and continue past Palmer Lake. 1 mile past Palmer Lake, turn left on Chopaka road and continue 3 miles to the north. The main access parking is on your right next to the Oxbow pond.
    Parking/Restroom Information
    A developed gravel parking area with reader board, large enough for trailer turn around. No restrooms available.
    Unique Features
    The steep mountain range to the west provides spectacular scenery which also is home to big horn sheep and mountain goats. The valley floor is mostly agricultural land with water rights for 305 acres. These fields are irrigated with center pivot systems and are held in an agricultural lease to cut and bale grass/alfalfa hay. This cropping provides short grass for geese and water fowl foraging. The ponds hold trumpeter swans, Canada geese and a variety of dabbling and diving ducks. The brushy riparian draws are a natural feature of the high water table, and provide habitat for upland birds as well as numerous migratory perching birds. A great place for bird watching, especially in the early spring.
    Other Information

    The access site includes ADA parking and an ADA trail to a viewing blind overlooking the pond. A small canoe launch is also available at this site, and with a short portage provides access to the Similkameen River.

    The area has current agricultural and grazing leases at various times of the year. The public is welcome to enjoy the area and are asked to respect the lessee’s equipment on the area. Please leave gates “as you find them”.

    The McLoughlin Falls wildlife unit was established by WDFW in May 2012 through jointly funded grants from the Salmon Recovery Funding Board and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. This 165.5-acre property was purchased to enhance riparian and big game habitats. The unit is located about 6 miles south of Tonasket along the Okanogan River. Elevation in the unit ranges from 860 feet to over 1,600 feet and temperatures vary throughout the year from –5° to 110° Fahrenheit.
    Viewing Opportunities

    Mammals

  • Deer
  • Elk
  • Other

  • Wildflowers
  • How to Get Here
    No information available.
    Carter Mountain wildlife unit includes 2,000 acres located 7 miles south of Tonasket. An additional 240 acres of land owned by the Bureau of Land Management are located within the unit’s boundaries. The terrain varies from broad valleys to rugged, rocky hillsides. Habitat types include shrub-steppe, dry grassland, and dry-mixed conifer forest. Agriculture and grazing have been used to improve vegetation for mule deer. The property was purchased in phases from 2008 through 2012 for mule deer wintering habitat. The unit supports a variety of wildlife including black bears, migratory birds, cougars, bobcats and golden eagles. Mule deer draw hunters to this unit each fall.
    Viewing Opportunities

    Birds

  • Birds of Prey
  • Eagles
  • Songbirds
  • Upland Birds
  • Mammals

  • Bear
  • Deer
  • How to Get Here
    Access Site #1
    Driving Directions

    From Tonasket via North Pine Creek Rd – From Tonasket, west on 4th Ave across Okanogan River to the Hwy 7 Junction. Turn left (south) on Hwy 7 and proceed 1 mile to North Pine Creek Road. Turn right (west) and drive 5 ½ miles to parking area on left side of road. Look for reader board adjacent to parking area.

    From Tonasket via Highway 97 – From Tonasket, drive south on Hwy 97 approximately 7 ¼ miles. Turn right onto gravel road just past wide pull-out lined with poplar trees and proceed about 100 yards to parking area on right. Do not drive uphill past signs – WDFW vehicle access only.

    Parking/Restroom Information
    There are two unimproved access areas used when visiting Carter Mountain – no restrooms are currently available. The first site is adjacent to Highway 97, approximately 1 mile south of Janis Bridge (where Hwy 97 crosses the Okanogan River) on the west side of the highway. The second site is on the west boundary of the wildlife area adjacent to North Pine Creek Road, 7 miles southwest of Tonasket.
    Other Information
    Private property borders a significant portion of the Carter Mountain Unit. Please respect private property and heed to posted signs where vehicle access is not permitted.

    Located 3.5 miles west of Tonasket, the Horse Spring Coulee Unit consists of approximately 850 acres. The terrain is predominately south-facing rolling sagebrush-steppe with rock outcroppings scattered throughout. Narrow, rocky valleys run north-south through the middle of the unit and eroded sandstone hills can be found in the northeast corner of the property, which is also the unit’s highest point. Elevation ranges from about 1,400 feet to 2,200 feet.

    Habitat types include sagebrush steppe and dry grasslands – no trees are found in this unit. The property was purchased in 2008 primarily for critical mule deer wintering habitat. The Horse Spring Coulee Unit has a variety of wildlife species including: mule deer, whitetail deer, song birds, various raptors, coyotes, badgers and numerous reptiles. Wildflowers and native grasses are plentiful in the spring and early summer making for a very scenic landscape. Hunting and horseback riding are popular activities on the wildlife area as well as hiking, wildlife viewing, and nature photography.


    Viewing Opportunities

    Birds

  • Birds of Prey
  • Songbirds
  • Mammals

  • Deer
  • Small Mammals
  • Other

  • Reptiles/Amphibians
  • Wildflowers
  • How to Get Here
    Access Site #1
    Driving Directions
    From Tonasket via North Pine Creek Rd – From Tonasket, west on 4th Ave across Okanogan River to the Hwy 7 Junction. Turn left (south) on Hwy 7 and proceed 1 mile to North Pine Creek Road. Turn right (west) and drive 3 ½ miles to the intersection of Horse Spring Coulee Road. Turn right (west) approximately 100 yards and park along the right shoulder of the road to access the property. An additional parking area can be found another ¾ of a mile on the right side of the road (look for posted signs).
    Parking/Restroom Information
    There are no designated access areas or developed facilities when visiting the Horse Spring Coulee Unit. The Aeneas Lake Access Site, which is located ¾ of a mile south of the area, has a restroom. Park alongside Horse Spring Coulee Road to access this unit.
    Other Information
    Private property borders the entire perimeter of the Horse Spring Coulee Unit. Please respect private property and read posted signs throughout the area.

    The 10,500 acres of the 4-O Ranch Unit of the Chief Joseph Wildlife Area, along the Grand Ronde River in the Blue Mountains of southeast Washington, were acquired in five phases from 2011 through 2015.

    This unit includes ten miles of river and creek habitat, with parts of the Wenatchee, Cougar, Grouse, and Medicine Creek drainages, tributaries, and shorelines of the Grande Ronde River, which is a tributary of the Snake River. The Grand Ronde is home to steelhead and bull trout, both federally listed as threatened and managed as state species of concern, as well as redband rainbow trout and many other fish and aquatic species.

    The unit also includes high quality riparian habitat, native grasslands, ponderosa pine woodlands, wildflower meadows, curl-leaf mountain mahogany stands, and talus slopes and cliffs. It provides important winter range for elk and mule deer, and year-round habitat for bighorn sheep. Many other wildlife species use the area, too, including cougar and black bear, golden eagle and northern goshawk, and a diversity of reptiles, invertebrates, neo-tropical migrant birds.

    Wildlife viewing and fishing on the Grande Ronde are popular activities.


    Viewing Opportunities

    Birds

  • Birds of Prey
  • Eagles
  • Songbirds
  • Upland Birds
  • Mammals

  • Bear
  • Bighorn sheep
  • Deer
  • Elk
  • Cougar
  • Small Mammals
  • Other

  • Butterflies
  • Reptiles/Amphibians
  • Wildflowers
  • How to Get Here
    Access Site #1
    Driving Directions
    From Asotin, WA: Turn right (east) on Washington Street to continue on Hwy. 129 towards (and past) Anatone and Field Springs State Park, traveling about 32 miles to the Grand Ronde River Road; continue west on the river road about 4 miles to the WDFW 4-O Ranch Wildlife Area sign on the right.
    Other Information
    Open year-round; however, snow will restrict motorized access in the winter.
    Unique Features
    This is mainly a deer and elk area. Wolves have been reported in this area and may be more observable in the future. Steelhead and bass fishing on the Grand Ronde is popular.
    The Cashmere Pond Unit is a 21 acre parcel adjacent to the Wenatchee River west of Cashmere. The unit is dominated by riparian habitat and contains a small pond that developed from an old borrow pit used during highway construction. Access to the parcel is only by boat via the Wenatchee River.
    Viewing Opportunities

    Birds

  • Birds of Prey
  • Eagles
  • Songbirds
  • Upland Birds
  • Mammals

  • Beaver
  • Small Mammals
  • Other

  • Butterflies
  • Reptiles/Amphibians
  • Wildflowers
  • How to Get Here
    Access Site #1
    Driving Directions
    There is no access to the Unit from Highway 2/97.
    Unique Features
    The unit was acquired for mitigation and has been used for salmon habitat improvement projects including a constructed channel to connect Cashmere Pond to the Wenatchee River to prevent entrainment of fish after high flows.
    This unit was acquired by the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife for conservation purposes. However, there is no public access available.
    Viewing Opportunities
    How to Get Here
    No information available.
    Other Information
    There is no public access.
    The 279-acre Eagle Island Unit is located on the North Fork Lewis River, east of the town of Woodland. The area is largely a forested floodplain comprised of mature conifer and deciduous trees but there is also a large meadow on the downstream end of the island. The management objective for the unit is to provide riparian and side-channel habitat for salmonids, as well as habitat for black-tailed deer, waterfowl, and songbirds.
    Viewing Opportunities

    Birds

  • Songbirds
  • Waterfowl
  • Eagles
  • Birds Of Prey
  • Wading Birds
  • Mammals

  • Black-Tailed Deer
  • Other

  • Salmon
  • How to Get Here
    Access Site #1
    Driving Directions
    This unit is only accessible by boat or by wading across the river from the Island Boat Ramp during low flow periods in the summer. The Island Boat Ramp is located approximately 5 miles east of Woodland along Lewis River Road/State Highway 503. Launching a boat during low flow periods at the Island Boat Ramp is not advised due to the shallow depth of the river adjacent to the launch area. Other public and private boat launches are available along the river to use year-round.
    Parking/Restroom Information
    There is a large parking lot at the Island Boat Ramp and restrooms. Overnight parking is not permitted. The access site is maintained by PacifiCorp.
    Other Information
    Vegetation on the island can be very dense and difficult to travel through. Boaters should also be aware of several log jams along the shoreline of the island that were built to improve salmonid habitat. Navigation around the structures is still possible and should not pose a hazard while traveling on the river.
    The 1,453 acre Merrill Lake Unit is located north of the town of Cougar, and is bordered by Merrill Lake to the south and the Kalama River to the north. The area has forest with recently harvested sites as well old growth forest, located primarily on an ancient lava flow. The unit also has a large stand of lodgepole pine, which is one of the unique features in the area.

    The Merrill Lake Unit is primarily managed for elk and black-tailed deer habitat and was acquired in 2015 and 2016 with help from the Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation and funding from the Recreation and Conservation Office.

    There is a waterfall on the Kalama River that is a popular site for hikers.

    Viewing Opportunities

    Birds

  • Songbirds
  • Birds Of Prey
  • Mammals

  • Elk
  • Deer
  • Other

  • Amphibians
  • How to Get Here
    Access Site #1
    Driving Directions
    From Interstate 5, take exit 21 in Woodland and head east 27 miles on State Highway 503 towards Cougar. Turn north on USFS Road 81 towards Merrill Lake and Kalama Horse Camp, drive seven miles to a large, gated pullout on west side of road. This is the old Weyerhaeuser 7500 Road. There is no vehicle access onto the Merrill Lake Unit.
    Parking/Restroom Information
    There are several small pullouts along USFS Road 81 and one larger parking area at the gated road into the unit. Only non-motorized access is allowed onto the Merrill Lake Unit. There are no restroom facilities onsite.
    Unique Features
    The Kalama River Falls is about a three-mile roundtrip hike from the parking area on the gated 7500 Road and USFS Road 81 intersection. There are also very large, old growth trees in the vicinity of the Kalama River falls. Tree casts can be found in the lava flow.
    Other Information
    Limited camping is allowed in marked areas adjacent to USFS Road 81 and must be within 50 feet of the pavement.
    The 3,816-acre Hoffstadt Unit is located east of Castle Rock in the North Fork Toutle River Valley. The unit is comprised of mixed conifer and deciduous forest, small meadows, and the debris plain from the 1980 eruption of Mount St. Helens. The area is primarily managed for elk. The eastern portion of this unit, which is within the Loo-wit Game Management Unit (GMU 522), is part of the Mudflow Elk Area and is open to elk hunting by special permit only. All other hunting within the Loo-wit GMU 522 is restricted.
    Viewing Opportunities

    Birds

  • Songbirds
  • Birds of Prey
  • Upland Birds
  • Waterfowl
  • Mammals

  • Deer
  • Elk
  • How to Get Here
    Access Site #1
    Driving Directions
    Access to unit properties on the south side of the North Fork Toutle River: From Castle Rock drive east on Highway 504/Spirit Lake Highway 10 miles to the town of Toutle, and turn east on South Toutle Road. Drive approximately four miles on South Toutle Road and turn south onto Weyerhaeuser 4100 Road. Drive to the 4200 Road and take it to gain access to the southern portion of the Hoffstadt Unit using several different road options.
    Parking/Restroom Information
    There is no designated parking area, and no restrooms in this unit.
    Access Site #2
    Driving Directions
    Access to unit properties on the north side of the North Fork Toutle River: From Castle Rock drive east on Highway 504/Spirit Lake Highway approximately 25 miles. The unit does not border the highway and a Weyerhaeuser Access Permit may be required to access this portion of the Hoffstadt Unit.
    Parking/Restroom Information
    There is no designated parking area, and no restrooms in this unit.
    Other Information
    Sections of the debris plain are unstable and unsettled soft soils, which may be a difficult or impassable to walk across.
     
       OTHER INFORMATION
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       MAPPING
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       OUTDOOR ACTIVITIES
    • Bird watching
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    • Wildlife viewing
     

    If you are Hunting or Fishing, remember to check all current regulations.

    Activities may include restrictions or require permits. Please see Public Conduct Rules for more information.