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WASHINGTON DEPARTMENT OF FISH AND WILDLIFE     Print Version
NEWS RELEASE
600 Capitol Way North, Olympia, WA 98501-1091


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October 09, 2018
Contact: Brian Calkins, 360-249-1222

WDFW corrects description of rules
for late archery hunts on Olympic Peninsula

OLYMPIA – Bow hunters are not allowed to harvest antlerless elk in any area of the Olympic Peninsula during any general season. An error that appeared in an online summary on the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife’s (WDFW) website incorrectly indicated that some areas would be open to the harvest of antlerless elk. 

It should have stated that game management units (GMUs) 603, 612, 615, 638 (except for Elk Area 6064), and 648 would be open for bull elk with three or more antler points on one side. The previous reference to “antlerless only” elk was incorrect and has been deleted from the webpage.

The areas in question in Clallam, Grays Harbor, and Jefferson counties are scheduled to open to bow hunting for elk Nov. 21 through Dec. 15.

Brian Calkins, regional WDFW wildlife manager, said the correct legal description of the season approved by the Washington Fish and Wildlife Commission is contained in the 2018 Big Game Hunting pamphlet.

“The three point or better, bull only rule protects cow elk from harvest and helps maintain a healthy male/female ratio in the population,” Calkins said. “In combination, these two factors are important to maintaining elk population numbers. We apologize for the error, and want to emphasize that the regulations in these areas have not changed from previous years.”