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Beach closure listing due to red tide and other marine toxins
WDFW Olympic Region Harmful Algal Bloom (ORHAB) project
 
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Tools and basic techniques for digging razor clams

Map of Razor Clam Beaches

Beaches in Washington with razor clam fisheries include:

Long Beach, which extends from the Columbia River to Leadbetter Point.

Twin Harbors Beach, which extends from the mouth of Willapa Bay north to the south jetty at the mouth of Grays Harbor.

Copalis Beach, which extends from the Grays Harbor north jetty to the Copalis River, and includes the Copalis, Ocean Shores, Oyhut, Ocean City and Copalis areas.

Mocrocks Beach, which extends from the Copalis River to the southern boundary of the Quinault Reservation near the Moclips River, including Iron Springs, Roosevelt Beach, Seabrook, Pacific Beach and Moclips.

Kalaloch Beach, which extends from the South Beach Campground to Brown’s Point (just south of Beach Trail 3) in the Olympic National Park. (This beach is closed to harvest until further notice)

September 21, 2016
Contact: Dan Ayres, (360) 249-4628

Marine toxin levels delay razor clam digs at
Long Beach, cloud openings elsewhere

OLYMPIA – Rising marine toxin levels have prompted the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) to delay upcoming razor clam digs at Long Beach and to review openings at other ocean beaches.

The department continues to monitor toxin levels to determine whether razor clam digging can proceed at Twin Harbors, Copalis and Mocrocks beaches.

WDFW previously announced a tentative schedule of digs for Oct. 14 through Dec. 31 at the four ocean beaches.

However, digs at Long Beach are on hold until tests indicate toxin levels have dropped and the clams are safe to eat, said Dan Ayres, WDFW coastal shellfish manager.

Test results on razor clams dug recently at Long Beach indicate levels of domoic acid exceed the threshold (20 parts per million) set by state public health officials. Domoic acid, a natural toxin produced by certain types of marine algae, can be harmful or even fatal if consumed in sufficient quantities.

Ayres noted that toxin levels also have increased over the past week at Twin Harbors, Copalis and Mocrocks but remain below the threshold set by public health officials.

“These latest toxin test results cast uncertainty on the fall razor clam season,” Ayres said. “We hope this is a short-term spike in toxin levels that won’t lead to closures at other beaches.”

Elevated levels of domoic acid forced state shellfish managers to cut short the razor clam season in the spring of 2015 and delay opening again last fall.

More information about domoic acid, as well as current levels at all ocean beaches, can be found on WDFW's domoic acid webpage.

Current tenative razor clam dig, along with evening low tides and beaches, is listed below:

  • Oct. 14, Friday, 5:55 p.m.;   0.2 feet; Twin Harbors, Copalis, Mocrocks
  • Oct. 15, Saturday, 6:42 p.m.; -0.6 feet; Twin Harbors, Copalis, Mocrocks
  • Oct. 16, Sunday, 7:28 p.m.; -1.1 feet; Twin Harbors, Copalis, Mocrocks
  • Oct. 17, Monday, 8:16 p.m.; -1.4 feet; Twin Harbors
  • Oct. 18, Tuesday, 9:04 p.m.; -1.4 feet; Twin Harbors
  • Oct. 19, Wednesday, 9:55 p.m.; -1.1 feet; Twin Harbors

A list of additional proposed openings through Dec. 31, 2016, is available below.


Under state law, diggers are required to keep the first 15 clams they dig. Each digger's clams must be kept in a separate container.

All diggers age 15 or older must have an applicable 2016-17 fishing license to harvest razor clams on any beach. Licenses, ranging from a three-day razor clam license to an annual combination fishing license, are available from license vendors around the state and WDFW’s licensing customer service number at (360) 902-2464.


2016-17 Washington Tenative Fall Recreatonal Razor Clam Openings

 Date

Day

Time

Low Tide

Beaches Scheduled to be Open

10/28

Fri

6:09 pm

0.5

Long Beach, Twin Harbors

10/29

Sat

6:45 pm

0.2

Long Beach, Twin Harbors

10/30

Sun

7:19 pm

0.0

Long Beach, Twin Harbors

10/31

Mon

7:53 pm

-0.1

Long Beach

11/1

Tue

8:27 pm

-0.1

Long Beach

11/2

Wed

9:02 pm

0.0

Long Beach

11/3

Thu

9:39 pm

0.2

Long Beach

11/4

Fri

10:19 pm

0.4

Long Beach

 

 

 

 

 

11/12

Sat

4:37 pm

-0.3

Long Beach, Twin Harbors

11/13

Sun

5:25 pm

-1.1

Long Beach, Twin Harbors

11/14

Mon

6:13 pm

-1.6

Long Beach, Twin Harbors

11/15

Tue

7:00 pm

- 1.8

Long Beach, Twin Harbors

11/16

Wed

7:48 pm

-1.7

Long Beach, Twin Harbors

11/17

Thu

8:37 pm

-1.3

Long Beach, Twin Harbors, Copalis, Mocrocks

11/18

Fri

9:28 pm

-0.8

Long Beach, Twin Harbors, Copalis, Mocrocks

11/19

Sat

10:22 pm

-0.1

Long Beach, Twin Harbors, Copalis, Mocrocks

 

 

 

 

 

11/26

Sat

4:47 pm

0.5

Long Beach, Twin Harbors

11/27

Sun

5:24 pm 

0.2

Long Beach, Twin Harbors

11/28

Mon

5:59 pm 

-0.1

Long Beach, Twin Harbors

11/29

Tue

6:33 pm 

-0.2

Long Beach

11/30

Wed

7:07 pm 

-0.3

Long Beach

12/1

Thu

7:41 pm

-0.2

Long Beach

12/2

Fri

8:18 pm

-0.1

Long Beach

12/3

Sat

8:56 pm

0.1

Long Beach

12/4

Sun

9:38 pm

0.4

Long Beach

12/5

Mon

10:24 pm

0.7

Long Beach

 

 

 

 

 

12/10

Sat

3:28 pm

0.5

Long Beach, Twin Harbors, Copalis, Mocrocks

12/11

Sun

4:21 pm

-0.5

Long Beach, Twin Harbors, Copalis, Mocrocks

12/12

Mon

5:11 pm

-1.2

Long Beach, Twin Harbors

12/13

Tue

5:59 pm

-1.6

Long Beach, Twin Harbors

12/14

Wed

6:46 pm

-1.8

Long Beach, Twin Harbors

12/15

Thu

7:32 pm 

-1.7

Long Beach, Twin Harbors

12/16

Fri

8:18 pm 

-1.3

Long Beach, Twin Harbors

12/17

Sat

9:04 pm 

-0.7

Long Beach, Twin Harbors

12/18

Sun

9:51 pm

0.0

Long Beach, Twin Harbors

 

 

 

 

 

12/26

Mon

5:00 pm 

0.3

Long Beach

12/27

Tue

5:37 pm 

0.0

Long Beach

12/28

Wed

6:13 pm 

-0.2

Long Beach

12/29

Thu

6:47 pm 

-0.4

Long Beach, Twin Harbors

12/30

Fri

7:22 pm 

-0.4

Long Beach, Twin Harbors, Copalis, Mocrocks

12/31

Sat

7:57 pm 

-0.4

Long Beach, Twin Harbors, Copalis, Mocrocks


The Washington Department of Health (DOH) monitors shellfish for a variety of contaminants, including biotoxins, pollution, and radiation. For more information on shellfish safety, visit DOH's recreational shellfish webpage.