Species status review

The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) periodically reviews the status of protected species in the state to determine whether each species warrants its current listing or deserves to be delisted or reclassified.

State wildlife managers begin the review process by seeking information and data from the public, including non-governmental groups, universities, private researchers and naturalists, on each species. The public input period typically lasts one year.

WDFW uses the public information to update the status of each species and make a recommendation about the species' listing classification. Wildlife managers then solicit public comment on the draft status reviews for at least 90 days. WDFW staff ultimately present their recommendations to the Washington Fish and Wildlife Commission, a citizen panel appointed by the governor, at a public hearing.

Awaiting commission action

The commission will make a determination on the listing classification of the species listed below. Check the commission webpage for public hearing dates and locations.

  • None awaiting commission action

Draft status reviews available for public review

Pinto abalone

Despite a ban on harvest and the establishment of a captive breeding program, information available to WDFW suggests that remnant populations of pinto abalone are not reproducing in the wild and may be in peril of local extinction. WDFW is soliciting any available data on the species, and seeks public comment on a proposal to list the pinto abalone as a State Endangered Species. Learn more about the pinto abalone.

Public Comments

Please review the status report for pinto abalone in Washington, and submit any comments and/or questions regarding pinto abalone in Washington to:

WDFW Fish Program, attention: Henry Carson
P.O. Box 43200
Olympia, WA 98504
360-902-2846
Henry.Carson@dfw.wa.gov

The deadline for submitting comments is May 15, 2019.

Tufted puffin

The tufted puffin, recognizable by its thick red bill and whitish tufts, spends the winter at sea, and nests during spring and summer in coastal colonies from California north to Alaska. Once common along the Washington coast, puffins have suffered a dramatic population decline in recent years. As discussed in the draft status review, possible reasons for this rapid decline include a reduction in available prey, predation at nesting colonies, and factors related to climate change. The Washington Fish and Wildlife Commission, which sets policy for WDFW, listed the tufted puffin as endangered in 2015.

Public Comments

Please review the Draft Washington State Recovery Plan and Periodic Status Review for the Tufted Puffin, and submit any comments and/or questions regarding tufted puffins in Washington to:

WDFW Wildlife Program, attention: Hannah Anderson
P.O. Box 43141
Olympia, WA 98504-3200
360-902-8403
TandEpubliccom@dfw.wa.gov

The deadline for submitting comments is May 17, 2019.

Oregon silverspot butterfly

The Oregon silverspot butterfly was historically found along the coast from Grays Harbor County to northern California, but disappeared from Washington in the 1980s.The species was listed as threatened under the federal Endangered Species Act in 1980, and as endangered under state law in 1993.  WDFW has been working with a variety of partners since 1990 to restore suitable habitat for Oregon silverspot butterflies with the goal of eventually reintroducing them to the state.

Public Comments

Please review the Draft Periodic Status Review for the Oregon silverspot in Washington, and submit any comments and/or questions regarding Oregon silverspots in Washington to:

WDFW Wildlife Program, attention: Hannah Anderson
P.O. Box 43141
Olympia, WA 98504-3200
360-902-8403
TandEpubliccom@dfw.wa.gov

The deadline for submitting comments is May 17, 2019.