Bead Lake

Eight miles north of Newport, in Kaniksu National Forest and year round open fishing season, Bead Lake is not stocked by the Department of Fish and Wildlife, but contains self-reproducing populations of kokanee, lake trout, burbot, plus numerous northern pikeminnows. Fishing at this lake should provide a unique experience.

A U.S. Forest Service boat launch and parking area at the south end of the lake can accommodate six boats and trailers, but may not be available by April due to snow conditions. Check with the USFS Newport Ranger District office at 509-447-7300 for more information.

Two-pole fishing is allowed

Good for ice fishing

Shoreline access: Good - Shoreline access is limited to area around boat launch. During the winter burbot/lake trout fishery, anglers typically fish through the ice, so walk-in access is better that time of year.

Species you might catch

Lake information

County: Pend Oreille
Acreage: 718.00 ac.
Elevation: 2833 ft.
Center: 48.29829, -117.112826
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Fishing prospects calendar

Kokanee

The Kokanee fishery typically lasts from April-October before the adults leave the lake to spawn in tributaries starting in late-October and early-November. Fishing is best in the spring before they move into deeper water to avoid warming water temperatures, but they can be targeted throughout the summer in deeper offshore areas near the thermocline. There may be a slight uptick in some waters in the fall as adults return to shallower water and move near shore towards spawning tributaries.

Chart of fishing prospects throughout the calendar year

Northern pikeminnow

Fishing success for Northern Pikeminnow increases in May and June as water temperatures increase, and generally peaks in late June, although fishing conditions can vary throughout the Columbia River. After a lull during the heat of summer, fishing success peaks again in late September-early October. Northern Pikeminnow congregate in rocky areas with fast currents near dams, islands, stream mouths, points, eddies, rows of pilings, and ledges or bars in the river. Sunrise, sunset, and night are generally the best fishing times. Studies show there are greater concentrations of Northern Pikeminnow in shallow water during low-light conditions.

Chart of fishing prospects throughout the calendar year