East Juan de Fuca Strait - Marine Area 6

Marine Area 6 is located east from Low Point to Partridge Point and Point Wilson primarily within the Strait of Juan de Fuca and to the west side of Whidbey Island. Excellent summer and winter salmon fishing opportunities exist here, as well as superb bottomfishing for species such as halibut and lingcod. During odd years, an additional two pink salmon can be kept which gives anglers another way to take home some extra fish; however during 2017 there will be no bonus limit due to the lower forecast but you can keep pink salmon as part of your daily limit.  Winter resident salmon fishing is a unique opportunity to catch salmon in the 'off-season' and typically runs from March through mid-April. 

Anglers who plan to fish for salmon in Canadian marine waters and return in their boats with their catch to Washington are required to notify WDFW before leaving state waters.

Legal description

Major fishing areas

31 - 36 Bank

Halibut are fished here by using jigs or weighted baits.

Accessible by Boat

Species: Pacific Halibut

Dallas Bank

Halibut are fished on the outer edge by using jigs or weighted baits.

Accessible by Boat

Species: Pacific Halibut

Diamond Point

Trolling using downrigger with flasher with hoochie, spoon, or herring for blackmouth. Fish the sharp drop off and near the bottom 15-20 feet of the water column.

Accessible by Boat

Species: Chinook salmon

Dungeness Bank

Halibut are fished on the outer edge by using jigs or weighted baits.

Accessible by Boat

Species: Pacific Halibut

Dungeness Bay

Most anglers fishing for coho during October troll or cast cut-plug herrings. This bay is ideal for those who want to fish out of a kayak.

Accessible by Boat

Accessible by Shoreline
Most shoreline is private, so be sure you have permission.

Species:Coho salmon

Dungeness Spit

Halibut are fished here by using jigs or weighted baits.

Accessible by Boat

Species: Pacific Halibut

Ediz Hook/The Humps

Trolling using downrigger or diver with flasher with hoochie, spoon, or herring for chinook, coho, pink, and blackmouth. Trolling, mooching, and jigging in this area is best on the outgoing tide one to two hours before sunset. Consider trying to fish for sockeye with similar gear (small pink hoochies) and methods (very slow) as pink salmon; you will need to use your fish finder to get your gear down to the fish.

Accessible by Boat

Species: Chinook salmon, Coho salmon, Pink salmon, Sockeye salmon

Green Point

Halibut are fished here by using jigs or weighted baits.

Accessible by Boat

Species: Pacific Halibut

Hein Bank

Trolling using downrigger with a flasher and hoochie, spoon, or herring is productive during the winter for blackmouth. Also consider mooching or jigging. Don't be surprised if you catch pink salmon here as well during odd years. Consider trying to fish for sockeye with similar gear (small pink hoochies) and methods (very slow) as pink salmon; you will need to use your fish finder to get your gear down to the fish. Halibut are fished on the outer edge by using jigs or weighted baits.

Accessible by Boat

Species: Chinook salmon, Pacific Halibut, Pink salmon, Sockeye salmon

Pink salmon fishing

During odd years, pink salmon returning must first pass through most of Puget Sound, making them accessible to small boat and shore anglers that uses only basic fishing gear and techniques. Pink salmon are not the strongest swimmers, so they often hug the shorelines and stay out of big rip tides. Best catch rates often occur in the mornings and evenings. The color pink is most commonly used for all lures and flies by anglers. Pink salmon are often mistaken for small wild chinook or even wild coho so be sure you know to properly identify it.

Boat Fishing
There are two main methods of fishing for pink salmon from a boat:

  • Trolling uses a downrigger to get your tackle to the depth you want to fish. Most pink salmon are caught in depths of 20-60 feet. The key to trolling is using a small flasher of any color, which attracts the pink salmon to swim along and hopefully strike at your lure. The most common lure is a pink mini squid (hoochie), followed by a pink spoon. Feel free to scent up your lure, however bait is not needed. Tie the lure 16-24 inches behind the flasher (18-25 lb. monofilament) and deploy your gear 10-30 feet behind the boat. The boat speed moving through the water should be 2 to 4 mph.
  • Casting at pink salmon from a boat uses the methods and gear described in shoreline fishing.

Shoreline Fishing
There are two main methods used for shore fishing pink salmon:

  • Casting Lures - The pink buzz bomb and a pink mini squid (hoochie) jig are most commonly used and are fished the same way by casting out away from shore and attempting to jig it as you reel it in. A medium to medium/heavy rod with 20-30 pound line is all you need to land these fish.
  • Flyfishing - The most common fly used is a pink clouser. A seven to eight weight fly rod and with either floating or a slow sink tip line will provide enough backbone to land the salmon and also create the necessary action on your fly to entice a few strikes.

Anglers using both fishing methods target the same type of water and can have similar success. As pink salmon are more prone to swim close to shore, most public parks and public piers throughout Puget Sound offer good fishing opportunities.

Accessible by Boat

Accessible by Shoreline
Public access sites, such as parks and piers

Species: Pink salmon

Tongue Pt. to Freshwater Bay

Trolling using downrigger or diver with flasher with hoochie, spoon, or herring along the shoreline one to two hours before and after the tide change is effective. Also mooching with cut plug or whole herring or jigging will help catch chinook, coho, and blackmouth. Pink salmon can also be caught here. Try fishing for bottomfish (lingcod, flatfish, and cabezon) along the kelp beds in 20-30 foot depths with jigs or herring. Consider trying to fish for sockeye with similar gear (small pink hoochies) and methods (very slow) as pink salmon; you will need to use your fish finder to get your gear down to the fish.

Accessible by Boat

Species: Cabezon, Chinook salmon, Coho salmon, Lingcod, Pacific halibut, Pink salmon, Sockeye salmon