Using transplanted mussels (Mytililis trossulus) to monitor and track PAH contaminants in the Puget Sound nearshore

Category: Fish/Shellfish Research

Published: 2019

Pages: 3

Author(s): Jennifer Lanksbury, Mariko Langness, Brandi Lubliner, James West, Andrea Carey, Laurie Niewolny

  • PAH pollutants are entering the nearshore food web of the Puget Sound, especially along shorelines adjacent to highly urbanized areas (e.g. Seattle).
  • Total PAH concentration in mussels increases with the percent of impervious surface (a proxy for urban development) in watersheds adjacent to the shoreline.
  • Transplanted mussels can be a useful tool to help identify different sources of PAHs to Puget Sound shorelines.

Suggested citation

Lanksbury, J.A., Langness, M., West, J.E., Carey, A.J., and Niewolny, L.A. (2019) Using transplanted mussels (Mytililis trossulus) to monitor and track PAH contaminants in the Puget Sound nearshore. pp. 20-21 in 2018 Salish Sea Toxics Monitoring Synthesis: A Selection of Research. Edited by C.A. James, R. Jordan, M. Langness, J. Lanksbury, D. Lester, S. O’Neill, K. Song, and C. Sullivan. Puget Sound Ecosystem Monitoring Program. Tacoma, WA. 88 pp: https://www.eopugetsound.org/articles/2018-salish-seatoxics-monitoring-synthesis