Ashes Lake

Ashes Lake, also known as Big Ash Lake, is a 54 acre lake adjacent to the Columbia River. This Lake Is connected to the Columbia River via a culvert and a Washington freshwater fishing license is required to fish this body of water. The lake is not stocked by WDFW but there are numerous species of fish available to catch. Access is difficult with minimal shore fishing sites and car top boat/raft/float tube opportunities only.

Two-pole fishing is NOT allowed

Shoreline access: Good - Very limited off of highway around culvert to the Columia

Species you might catch

Lake information

County: Skamania
Acreage: 47.60 ac.
Elevation: 92 ft.
Center: 45.673526, -121.914129
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Fishing prospects calendar

Largemouth bass

Fishing improves throughout the spring as waters warm and fish move onshore, peaking during the spawn. Summer is a slight lull though dawn/dusk hours can be very good. Catch improves in Fall as waters cool, vegetation begins to die back, and prey becomes more available. Winter is the hardest time because fish are offshore and slow moving.

Chart of fishing prospects throughout the calendar year

Smallmouth bass

Fishing improves throughout the spring as waters warm and fish move onshore, peaking during the spawn. Summer is a slight lull though dawn/dusk hours can be very good. Catch improves in Fall as waters cool, vegetation begins to die back, and prey becomes more available. Winter is the hardest time because fish are offshore and slow moving.

Chart of fishing prospects throughout the calendar year

Northern pikeminnow

Fishing success for Northern Pikeminnow increases in May and June as water temperatures increase, and generally peaks in late June, although fishing conditions can vary throughout the Columbia River. After a lull during the heat of summer, fishing success peaks again in late September-early October. Northern Pikeminnow congregate in rocky areas with fast currents near dams, islands, stream mouths, points, eddies, rows of pilings, and ledges or bars in the river. Sunrise, sunset, and night are generally the best fishing times. Studies show there are greater concentrations of Northern Pikeminnow in shallow water during low-light conditions.

Chart of fishing prospects throughout the calendar year