Riffe Lake

Riffe Lake, historically known as Mossyrock Lake then as Davisson Lake, is a reservoir formed by Mossyrock Dam. It is a popular water for smallmouth bass.   The lake stretches more than 13 miles along US-12 east of Mossyrock and has a year-round open fishing season.

Riffe provides good fishing for landlocked coho and Chinook salmon, plus an occasional large brown trout. Rainbow and cutthroat trout are also available. Landlocked salmon rules apply. Other warm water species present include brown bullheads, along with a few bluegill and crappie. There are no Kokanee in Riffe Lake.

Mossyrock Park, near the west end on the south side of the dam, has camping facilities that can be reserved by calling (360) 983-3900. Mossyrock Park boat launch remains useable during most low-water conditions. Boat launches at the east end (Kosmos and Taidnapam Park) are not usable during low-water periods.

Bank access is available on both sides near the dam and at the Taidnapam Park "fishing bridge" near the upper end of the lake. Call the Tacoma Power toll-free fishing hotline at (888) 502-8690 to check reservoir levels.

Two-pole fishing is allowed

Shoreline access: Good - Available by the dam and at theTaidnapam Park fishing bridge.

Species you might catch

Lake information

County: Lewis
Acreage: 11325.90 ac.
Elevation: 774 ft.
Center: 46.477388, -122.295061
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Fishing prospects calendar

Coastal cutthroat trout (resident)

Fishing is best for Coastal Cutthroat in the spring and fall. There is a summer lull as fish move offshore into deeper waters to escape the summer heat in July and August. Catch is lowest in the late-winter while adults are spawning in tributary streams.

Chart of fishing prospects throughout the calendar year

Smallmouth bass

Fishing improves throughout the spring as waters warm and fish move onshore, peaking during the spawn. Summer is a slight lull though dawn/dusk hours can be very good. Catch improves in Fall as waters cool, vegetation begins to die back, and prey becomes more available. Winter is the hardest time because fish are offshore and slow moving.

Chart of fishing prospects throughout the calendar year

Black crappie

Fishing improves throughout the Spring, peaking during the spawn. Summer is a slight lull, while Fall sees an improvement as waters cool, vegetation dies back, and prey becomes more available. During winter, the bite is slower, but anglers can have great success fishing through the ice when conditions are safe.

Chart of fishing prospects throughout the calendar year

Bluegill

Bluegill can be caught year-round, but fishing is best in the warm months of Summer. Fishing improves throughout the spring, peaking during the spawn in early-Summer. Fish move offshore into deeper waters through the fall as water temperatures cool making it more difficult to target them. Winter is the most difficult season in which to catch Bluegill, but persistent anglers can find them in schools of like-sized fish offshore.

Chart of fishing prospects throughout the calendar year

Brown bullhead

Fishing improves throughout the spring, peaking before the spawning period in May and June. Fishing may pick up in early Fall, followed by a decrease in action as waters cool. Winter is a difficult time to target this species.

Chart of fishing prospects throughout the calendar year